Timothy Prickett Morgan

Author Archives: Timothy Prickett Morgan

Spectrum-4 Ethernet Leaps To 800G With Nvidia Circuits

When Nvidia announced a deal to buy Mellanox Technologies for $6.9 billion in March 2019, everyone spent a lot of time thinking about the synergies between the two companies and how networking was going to become an increasingly important part of the distributed systems that run HPC and AI workloads.

Spectrum-4 Ethernet Leaps To 800G With Nvidia Circuits was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

Nvidia Will Be A Prime Contractor For Big AI Supercomputers

Normally, when we look at a system, we think from the compute engines at a very fine detail and then work our way out across the intricacies of the nodes and then the interconnect and software stack that scales it across the nodes into a distributed computing platform.

Nvidia Will Be A Prime Contractor For Big AI Supercomputers was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

AMD Rounds Out “Aldebaran” GPU Lineup With Instinct MI210

When the “Aldebaran” datacenter GPUs were launched by AMD last November for the HPC and AI crowd pushing up into the exascale stratosphere, only the two top-end models of the Instinct GPU accelerators –ones that use the Open Accelerator Module (OAM) form factor put forth by Facebook and Microsoft under the Open Compute Project – were actually available.

AMD Rounds Out “Aldebaran” GPU Lineup With Instinct MI210 was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

“Milan-X” 3D Vertical Cache Yields Epyc HPC Bang For The Buck Boost

Last fall ahead of the SC21 supercomputing conference, AMD said it was going to be the first of the major compute engine makers to add 3D vertical L3 cache to its chips, in this case to variants of  the “Milan” Epyc 7003 series of processors that debuted in March 2021 called the “Milan-X” chips.

“Milan-X” 3D Vertical Cache Yields Epyc HPC Bang For The Buck Boost was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

Burning Cash Like Rocket Fuel To Get Hashi Stack To The Next Stage

Creating a platform is a massive technical challenge. We have seen many technically elegant ones in recent years – Cloud Foundry, Engine Yard, the original OpenShift, Photon Platform, Mesos, OpenStack come immediately to mind – that didn’t quite make it, and importantly did not rise to the economic challenge of making enough money to sustain the continued development and support of that platform to have to reach tens of thousands, to hundreds of thousands, to millions of customers.

Burning Cash Like Rocket Fuel To Get Hashi Stack To The Next Stage was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

Teaching Kubernetes To Do Fractions And Multiplication On GPUs

When any new abstraction layer comes to compute, it can only think in integers at first, and then it learns to do fractions and finally, if we are lucky – and we are not always lucky – that abstraction layer learns to do multiplication and scale out across multiple nodes as well as scaling in – slicing itself into pieces – within a single node.

Teaching Kubernetes To Do Fractions And Multiplication On GPUs was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

How China Made An Exascale Supercomputer Out Of Old 14 Nanometer Tech

If you need any proof that it doesn’t take the most advanced chip manufacturing processes to create an exascale-class supercomputer, you need look no further than the Sunway “OceanLight” system housed at the National Supercomputing Center in Wuxi, China.

How China Made An Exascale Supercomputer Out Of Old 14 Nanometer Tech was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

A Cornucopia Of Memory And Bandwidth In The Agilex-M FPGA

When it comes to memory for compute engines, FPGAs – or rather what we have started calling hybrid FPGAs because they have all kinds of hard coded logic as well as the FPGA programmable logic on a single package – have the broadest selection of memory types of any kind of device out there.

A Cornucopia Of Memory And Bandwidth In The Agilex-M FPGA was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.