What is platform engineering and when should you invest in it?

As application platforms grow larger, the idea of DevOps teams where developers support the software development lifecycle, but also manage infrastructure and the platform, is beginning to reach the limits of what these teams can support. Rather than taking their best application developers and making them work on infrastructure problems, more organizations are coming to the conclusion that a centralized platform team specialized in that area is a better use of their developers’ skill sets. But what exactly is the platform engineering team and how is it different from the DevOps team? Should your organization invest in platform engineering? Let’s take a closer look.

Platform engineering: What is it and how did it come about?

Platform engineering is essentially building (selecting/standardizing on), operating, and managing the infrastructure that supports 1st- and 3rd-party applications. In the days before cloud-native application development, what we saw was that there was a central team that provided compute infrastructure for enterprise developers to build and host their applications. At a certain point in time, those developers moved to a microservices-based architecture. They didn’t just need virtual machines or servers where they could run their applications; they were building those applications in a containerized form factor, Continue reading

Cross compiling Rust — Fixed

Set up build environment

rustup toolchain install nightly
rustup component add rust-src --toolchain nightly
apt install {binutils,gcc}-mips-linux-gnu

Create test project

cargo new foo
cd foo

Configure linker

mkdir .cargo
cat > .cargo/config.toml
[target.mips-unknown-linux-gnu]
linker = "mips-linux-gnu-gcc"
^D

Build

cargo +nightly build --release -Zbuild-std --target mips-unknown-linux-gnu

Change the “interpreter” to what the Ubiquiti system expects

cd target/mips-unknown-linux-gnu/release
patchelf --remove-needed ld.so.1 foo
patchelf --set-interpreter /lib/ld-musl-mips-sf.so.1 foo

Does it work?

$ ./foo
Hello, world!

Yay!

  • https://doc.rust-lang.org/rustc/targets/custom.html
  • https://doc.rust-lang.org/cargo/reference/config.html

Meta Llama 3 available on Cloudflare Workers AI

We are thrilled to give developers around the world the ability to build AI applications with Meta Llama 3 using Workers AI. We are proud to be a launch partner with Meta for their newest 8B Llama 3 model, and excited to continue our partnership to bring the best of open-source models to our inference platform.

Workers AI

Workers AI’s initial launch in beta included support for Llama 2, as it was one of the most requested open source models from the developer community. Since that initial launch, we’ve seen developers build all kinds of innovative applications including knowledge sharing chatbots, creative content generation, and automation for various workflows.  

At Cloudflare, we know developers want simplicity and flexibility, with the ability to build with multiple AI models while optimizing for accuracy, performance, and cost, among other factors. Our goal is to make it as easy as possible for developers to use their models of choice without having to worry about the complexities of hosting or deploying models.

As soon as we learned about the development of Llama 3 from our partners at Meta, we knew developers would want to start building with it as quickly as possible. Continue reading

Cloudflare named in 2024 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for Security Service Edge

Gartner has once again named Cloudflare to the Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for Security Service Edge (SSE) report1. We are excited to share that Cloudflare is one of only ten vendors recognized in this report. For the second year in a row, we are recognized for our ability to execute and the completeness of our vision. You can read more about our position in the report here.

Last year, we became the only new vendor named in the 2023 Gartner® Magic Quadrant™ for SSE. We did so in the shortest amount of time as measured by the date since our first product launched. We also made a commitment to our customers at that time that we would only build faster. We are happy to report back on the impact that has had on customers and the Gartner recognition of their feedback.

Cloudflare can bring capabilities to market quicker, and with greater cost efficiency, than competitors thanks to the investments we have made in our global network over the last 14 years. We believe we were able to become the only new vendor in 2023 by combining existing advantages like our robust, multi-use global proxy, our lightning-fast DNS resolver, our Continue reading

Cross compiling Rust to Ubiquiti access point

This is not the right way to do it, as will become abundantly clear. But it works.

Set up build environment

rustup toolchain install nightly
rustup component add rust-src --toolchain nightly
apt install {binutils,gcc}-mips-linux-gnu

Create test project

cargo new foo
cd foo

Build most of it

This will build for a while, then fail.

cargo +nightly build --release -Zbuild-std --target mips-unknown-linux-gnu

For some reason it’s trying to use cc to link. I tried putting this in Cargo.toml, but it does nothing:

[target.mips-unknown-linux-gnu]
linker = "mips-linux-gnu-gcc"

But I found a workaround.

Temporarily change /usr/bin/cc to point to the mips gcc

It does not work if you do this before the previous step.

PREV="$(readlink -v /usr/bin/cc)"
sudo rm /usr/bin/cc
sudo ln -s /usr/bin/mips-linux-gnu-gcc /usr/bin/cc

Same command again

cargo +nightly build --release -Zbuild-std --target mips-unknown-linux-gnu

It should succeed. Yay.

Restore /usr/bin/cc

sudo rm /usr/bin/cc
sudo ln -s "${PREV?}" /usr/bin/cc

Change the “interpreter” to what the Ubiquiti system expects

cd target/mips-unknown-linux-gnu/release
patchelf --remove-needed ld.so.1 foo
patchelf --set-interpreter /lib/ld-musl-mips-sf.so.1 foo

Building it again

Probably easiest to rm -fr target, and go back to the step “Build most of it”.

Does it work?

$ ./foo
Hello, world!

Yay!

  • https://doc.rust-lang.org/rustc/targets/custom.html

What Happens When Hyperscalers And Clouds Buy Most Servers And Storage?

We have a long-standing joke that dates from the early 2000s, when the hyperscalers – there were not yet cloud builders as we now know them – started having hundreds of millions of users and millions of servers and storage arrays to run applications for them at the same time there was the beginnings of consolidation among the OEMs who created the servers and storage used by nearly all enterprises, including dot-com startups.

What Happens When Hyperscalers And Clouds Buy Most Servers And Storage? was written by Timothy Prickett Morgan at The Next Platform.

Tracking EC2 Instances used by EKS with AWS CLI

As a sort of follow-up to my previous post on using the AWS CLI to track the specific Elastic Network Interfaces (ENIs) used by Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) cluster nodes, this post focuses on the EC2 instances themselves. I feel this is less of a “problem” than tracking ENIs, but I wanted to share this information nevertheless. In this post, I’ll show you which AWS CLI command to use to list all the EC2 instances associated with a particular EKS cluster.

If you read the previous post on tracking ENIs used by EKS, you might think that you could use a very similar AWS CLI command (aws ec2 describe-instances instead of aws ec2 describe-network-interfaces) to track the EC2 instances in a cluster—and you’d be mostly correct. Like the ENIs, EKS does add a cluster-specific tag to all EC2 instances in the cluster. However, just to make life interesting, the tag used for EC2 instances is not the same as the tag used for ENIs. (If someone at AWS knows of a technical reason why these tags are different, I’d love to hear it.)

Instead of using the cluster.k8s.amazonaws.com/name tag that is used Continue reading

Power Efficiency, Customization Will Drive Arm’s Role In AI

More than a decade ago, executives at Arm Ltd saw the energy costs in datacenters soaring and sensed an opportunity to extend the low-power architecture of its eponymous systems-on-a-chip that has dominated the mobile phone markets from the get-go and took over the embedded device market from PowerPC into enterprise servers.

Power Efficiency, Customization Will Drive Arm’s Role In AI was written by Jeffrey Burt at The Next Platform.

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