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Category Archives for "Network World Data Center"

Using strace and ltrace to help with troubleshooting on Linux

Both strace and ltrace are powerful command-line tools for debugging and troubleshooting programs on Linux: Strace captures and records all system calls made by a process as well as the signals received, while ltrace does the same for library calls.If a program acts differently than you expect, you can use these tools to see “behind the curtain” and maybe get some clues as to what is going on. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Be forewarned, though. When you use either of these commands, you will end up with a lot of output to look through. Still, that can tell you quite a bit about how a process is working and sometimes give you important insights.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell bolsters storage lineup with 500 software upgrades

Dell will implement an array of new features for its storage platforms aimed at “cloud-ifying” its systems and improving support for hybrid environments, the company announced this week at its annual Dell Technologies World event in Las Vegas.Dell touted more than 500 software advancements in three key platforms: PowerStore storage appliances, PowerMax mission-critical storage and PowerFlex software-defined storage framework. The main updates for PowerStore are improved support for native file replication and third-party file monitoring and ransomware protection, along with improved networking speeds, NVMe support, and deeper integration for VMware vSphere Virtual Volumes (vVols) virtualized SAN/NAS arrays and disaster recovery.To read this article in full, please click here

5 reasons restores can take longer than backups

It comes as a big surprise to many people when their restores are slower than their backups, but it should be no surprise at all. In fact, everyone should plan for this disparity and build into their backup design.There are a number of reasons why restore speeds are typically slower than backup, and here is an explanation of five of them. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The RAID write penalty Most modern disk arrays are built using parity-based redundant array of independent disks (RAID)—RAID levels 3 to 6. Others are built using erasure coding, which has a similar challenge as parity-based RAID.To read this article in full, please click here

How to cheat on Wordle using Linux

Wordle—the online game that gives you six tries to guess a five-letter word—has gone viral recently, and while it’s fun, it can also be pretty hard. So, as a bash-scripting enthusiast, I figured I'd see if I could come up with a script that would help me cheat.The game itself is fairly simple. After you enter a five-letter guess, the game indicates which of its letters are not in the mystery word by setting them off on a gray background, which ones are in the word but in the wrong location (orange background), and which ones are in the word and located in the right place (green background). Each guess must be a known English word, no capitals, no punctuation.To read this article in full, please click here

What is a SAN and how does it differ from NAS?

A storage area network (SAN) is a dedicated, high-speed network that provides access to block-level storage. SANs were adopted to improve application availability and performance by segregating storage traffic from the rest of the LAN. SANs enable enterprises to more easily allocate and manage storage resources, achieving better efficiency. “Instead of having isolated storage capacities across different servers, you can share a pool of capacity across a bunch of different workloads and carve it up as you need. It’s easier to protect, it’s easier to manage,” says Scott Sinclair, senior analyst with Enterprise Strategy Group.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell releases reference designs for retail, manufacturing edge solutions

Dell will offer new "validated" designs — a term used for edge devices that have been tested for compatibility in a range of important capabilities in a particular field — for retail edge computing deployments and the manufacturing sector later this year, according to an announcement issued today.The idea behind both the retail and manufacturing validated designs is to provide a central infrastructure stack for the numerous individual applications that might be in use in any given location. For retail, that can range from inventory tracking systems and smart labels on shelves, to connected point-of-sale terminals, all the way up through numerous smart vision capabilities.To read this article in full, please click here

Alibaba, Microsoft launch Arm-based cloud instances

While the on-premises server business remains firmly in the grip of the x86 world, cloud service providers are giving Arm-based servers a much more welcoming embrace. Both Chinese cloud giant Alibaba and Microsoft Azure have recently launched new instances with Arm processors.Alibaba Cloud unveiled its Yitian 710 processor design for use in its data centers back in October 2021. The company also announced the development of its proprietary servers, called Panjiu, promising optimized computing performance and energy efficiency.Yitian 710 is built on a 5nm manufacturing process and has 128 Arm cores, each with a top clock speed of 3.2GHz. It’s built on the Armv9 architecture and includes eight DDR5 memory channels per CPU and 96-lane PCIe 5.0. Alibaba claims the Yitian 710 achieved a SPECint2017 that beat the current state-of-the-art Arm server processor by 20% in performance and 50% in energy efficiency.To read this article in full, please click here

Using whereis, whatis, and which to find out about commands on Linux

When you're trying to find your way around the Linux file system and want some information on specific commands, the whereis, whatis, and which commands can help. Each provides a different view of the command you're asking about. In this post, I'll compare these commands and explain what they tell us and what they don't tell us.which The which command is the simplest of the three. When you use it to ask about a Linux command, it will run down your search path looking for executable files by the name you specify. These can be commands that are available on your system as well as scripts. As long as the files provide you with execute privilege, they fit the bill. Here are some examples:To read this article in full, please click here

Creating a quick calculation function on Linux

Anytime you're planning to do a lot of calculations on a Linux system, you can use the power of bash to create a quick function and then use it repeatedly to do the calculations for you. In this post, we'll look at how this trick works and what you need to be aware of to ensure that your calculations are correct.Let's start with this mathematical function as an example:$ ? () { echo "$*" | bc ; } Troubleshooting your bash scripts in Linux   This command sets up a function that will pass the values and mathematical operators that you provide as arguments to the bc calculator command. Note that to call the function, you simply type a "?" followed by the arguments. In the first example below, the arguments are 1, followed by the multiplication character "*", followed by a 2, a "+" sign and a 3. The result is 5.To read this article in full, please click here

New Fujitsu cloud service is based Arm chips used in the world’s fastest supercomputer

Fujitsu announced it will launch a cloud service based on the same hardware used in the world's fastest supercomputer, Fugaku.The first step in what it calls Fujitsu Computing-as-a-Service (CaaS) will be Fujitsu Cloud Service HPC, which offers the high-performance computing power of the Fujitsu Supercomputer PRIMEHPC FX1000, which is based on the A64FX 64-bit Arm processor Fujitsu developed specifically for Fugaku. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Fujitsu cloud service is based on Arm chips used in the world’s fastest supercomputer

Fujitsu announced it will launch a cloud service based on the same hardware used in the world's fastest supercomputer, Fugaku.The first step in what it calls Fujitsu Computing-as-a-Service (CaaS) will be Fujitsu Cloud Service HPC, which offers the high-performance computing power of the Fujitsu Supercomputer PRIMEHPC FX1000, which is based on the A64FX 64-bit Arm processor Fujitsu developed specifically for Fugaku. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Fujitsu cloud service is based on Arm chips used in the world’s fastest supercomputer

Fujitsu announced it will launch a cloud service based on the same hardware used in the world's fastest supercomputer, Fugaku.The first step in what it calls Fujitsu Computing-as-a-Service (CaaS) will be Fujitsu Cloud Service HPC, which offers the high-performance computing power of the Fujitsu Supercomputer PRIMEHPC FX1000, which is based on the A64FX 64-bit Arm processor Fujitsu developed specifically for Fugaku. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Edge computing moves toward full autonomy

Edge computing is rapidly shedding its reputation as a fringe concept, and both adopters and vendors are focusing their sights on the technology's next goal: fully autonomous deployment and operation.The edge deployment experience is drawing closer to the simplicity of unboxing a new mobile phone, says Teresa Tung, cloud first chief technologist at IT advisory and consulting firm Accenture. "We're seeing automated technology that simplifies handling the edge’s unique complexity for application, network, and security deployments."The ability to create and manage containerized applications enables seamless development and deployment in the cloud, with the edge simply becoming a specialized location with more stringent resource constraints, Tung says. "Self-organizing and self-healing wireless mesh communications protocols, such as Zigbee, Z-Wave, ISA100.11a, or WirelessHART can create networks where devices can be deployed ad hoc and self-configure."To read this article in full, please click here

Hot chip startup Ampere files for IPO

California-based chipmaker Ampere confidentially filed for an initial public offering on April 11, when it submitted a draft registration statement with the US Securities and Exchange Commission.Founded by the former Intel president Renée James in 2017, Ampere designs fabless server processors based on Arm architectures. It is riding a strong wave of recent demand thanks to its latest Altra and Altra Max CPUs, which are designed for the data center based on the Arm Neoverse N1 architecture. It counts the likes of ByteDance, Cloudflare, Equinix, Oracle, and Tencent as customers of its processors.To read this article in full, please click here

Demystifying &&, ||, and ! on Linux

The &&, ||, and ! operators allow you to run a lot of useful commands on Linux, but you first need to get used to syntax that is a little trickier than the if-then-else command you might normally use.To get started, I should explain that one thing the command examples in this post have in common is the use of something that I might call a shorthand “if” test. Here’s an example:$ [ -f donuts ] $ echo %?1 The -f donuts command asks if there is a file (-f) named “donuts”. Unless we display the return code afterwards with "echo $?", the result of the test is not displayed. In this case, it’s false (i.e., not zero), so we know the file doesn’t exist. No donuts for us!To read this article in full, please click here

HP finishes the ultimate edge computing test: In space

You want edge computing? How about 250 miles straight up? HP Enterprise has announced that the Spaceborne Computer-2 (SBC-2) on the International Space Station (ISS) has successfully completed 24 research experiments in less than a year.The SBC-2 is the first in-space commercial edge computing and AI-enabled system to run on the ISS, according to HPE, and was installed in May 2021. The experiments involved real-time data processing and testing of new applications to prove reliability in space to increase autonomy for astronauts. HPE said the experiments reduced the time-to-insight from days and months to minutes.How to choose an edge gateway SBC-2 consists of HPE’s Edgeline Converged EL4000 Edge system, which is designed to perform in harsher edge environments, including space. SBC-2 is also made up of the HPE ProLiant DL360 high-performance server designed for workloads like HPC, and AI.To read this article in full, please click here

HPE finishes the ultimate edge computing test: In space

You want edge computing? How about 250 miles straight up? HP Enterprise has announced that the Spaceborne Computer-2 (SBC-2) on the International Space Station (ISS) has successfully completed 24 research experiments in less than a year.The SBC-2 is the first in-space commercial edge computing and AI-enabled system to run on the ISS, according to HPE, and was installed in May 2021. The experiments involved real-time data processing and testing of new applications to prove reliability in space to increase autonomy for astronauts. HPE said the experiments reduced the time-to-insight from days and months to minutes.How to choose an edge gateway SBC-2 consists of HPE’s Edgeline Converged EL4000 Edge system, which is designed to perform in harsher edge environments, including space. SBC-2 is also made up of the HPE ProLiant DL360 high-performance server designed for workloads like HPC, and AI.To read this article in full, please click here