Greg Brimble

Author Archives: Greg Brimble

Supporting Remix with full stack Cloudflare Pages

Supporting Remix with full stack Cloudflare Pages
Supporting Remix with full stack Cloudflare Pages

We announced the open beta of full stack Cloudflare Pages in November and have since seen widespread uptake from developers looking to add dynamic functionality to their applications. Today, we're excited to announce Pages' support for Remix applications, powered by our full stack platform.

The new kid on the block: Remix

Remix is a new framework that is focused on fully utilizing the power of the web. Like Cloudflare Workers, it uses modern JavaScript APIs, and it places emphasis on web fundamentals such as meaningful HTTP status codes, caching and optimizing for both usability and performance. One of the biggest features of Remix is its transportability: Remix provides a platform-agnostic interface and adapters allowing it to be deployed to a growing number of providers. Cloudflare Workers was available at Remix's launch, but what makes Workers different in this case, is the native compatibility that Workers can offer.

One of the main inspirations for Remix was the way Cloudflare Workers uses native web APIs for handling HTTP requests and responses. It's a brilliant decision because developers are able to reuse knowledge on the server that they gained building apps in the browser! Remix runs natively on Cloudflare Workers, and the results Continue reading

Building a full stack application with Cloudflare Pages

Building a full stack application with Cloudflare Pages
Building a full stack application with Cloudflare Pages

We were so excited to announce support for full stack applications in Cloudflare Pages that we knew we had to show it off in a big way. We've built a sample image-sharing platform to demonstrate how you can add serverless functions right from within Pages with help from Cloudflare Workers. With just one new file to your project, you can add dynamic rendering, interact with other APIs, and persist data with KV and Durable Objects. The possibilities for full-stack applications, in combination with Pages' quick development cycles and unlimited preview environments, gives you the power to create almost any application.

Today, we're walking through our example image-sharing platform. We want to be able to share pictures with friends while still also keeping some images private. We'll build a JSON API with Functions (storing data on KV and Durable Objects), integrate with Cloudflare Images and Cloudflare Access, and use React for our front end.

If you're wanting to dive right into the good stuff, our demo instance is published here, and the code is on GitHub, but stick around for a more gentle approach.

Building a full stack application with Cloudflare Pages

Building serverless functions with Cloudflare Pages

File-based routing

If you're not already familiar, Cloudflare Pages Continue reading

Optimizing images on the web

Optimizing images on the web
Optimizing images on the web

Images are a massive part of the Internet. On the median web page, images account for 51% of the bytes loaded, so any improvement made to their speed or their size has a significant impact on performance.

Today, we are excited to announce Cloudflare’s Image Optimization Testing Tool. Simply enter your website’s URL, and we’ll run a series of automated tests to determine if there are any possible improvements you could make in delivering optimal images to visitors.

Optimizing images on the web

How users experience speed

Everyone who has ever browsed the web has experienced a website that was slow to load. Often, this is a result of poorly optimized images on that webpage that are either too large for purpose or that were embedded on the page with insufficient information.

Images on a page might take painfully long to load as pixels agonizingly fill in from top-to-bottom; or worse still, they might cause massive shifts of the page layout as the browser learns about their dimensions. These problems are a serious annoyance to users and as of August 2021, search engines punish pages accordingly.

Understandably, slow page loads have an adverse effect on a page's “bounce rate” which is the percentage of Continue reading