Samuel Kommu

Author Archives: Samuel Kommu

Migrate from Cross-VC to Federation using NSX-T Migration Coordinator

NSX-T 3.2.1

With the VMware NSX-T 3.2.1 release, Migration Coordinator adds one more game changing feature: migrating from multisite NSX for vSphere deployments directly to NSX Federation. This feature builds on top of the User Defined Topology mode of migration. Folks familiar with the User Defined Topology will find the workflow similar and following the same simple model.

In this blog post, we will look at this new feature and how to leverage it. Please check out the resource links for more information on Migration Coordinator. Here, we will start with a high-level overview before digging into the details.

Migration Coordinator

Migration Coordinator is a tool that was introduced around 3 years ago, with NSX-T 2.4, to enable customers to migrate from NSX for vSphere to NSX-T. It is a free fully supported tool that is built into NSX-T. Migration Coordinator is flexible with multiple options enabling multiple ways to migrate based on customer requirements.

With the NSX-T 3.2 release, Migration Coordinator offered three primary modes for migration:

  1. Migrate Everything: From edges, to compute, to workloads — in an automated fashion and with a workflow that is like an in-place upgrade on existing hardware. This mode only needs enough resources to host NSX-T manager appliances and edges along Continue reading

NSX-T 3.2 Introduces Migration Coordinator’s User Defined Topology Mode

VMware NSX-T 3.2 is one of our largest releases — and it’s packed full of innovative features that address multi-cloud security, scale-out networking, and simplified operations. Check out the release blog for an overview of the new features introduced with this release.

Among those new features, let’s look at one of the highlights. With this release, Migration Coordinator now supports a groundbreaking feature addressing user-defined topology and enabling flexibility around supported topologies. In this blog post, we’ll look at the workflow for this new feature — starting with a high-level overview and then digging into the details of User Defined Topology. For more information on Migration Coordinator, check out the resource links at the end of this blog.

Migration Coordinator

Migration Coordinator is a tool that was introduced about 3 years ago with NSX-T 2.4. It enabled customers to migrate from NSX for vSphere to NSX-T Data Center. It’s a free and fully supported tool built into NSX-T Data Center. Migration Coordinator is flexible, with multiple options enabling multiple ways to migrate based on customer requirements.

Prior to NSX-T 3.2, Migration Coordinator offered two primary options:

  1. Migrate Everything: Migrate from edges to compute, to workloads in an automated fashion and with a workflow that resembles an in-place upgrade on existing Continue reading

NSX-T Data Center Migration Coordinator – Modular Migration

NSX-T 3.1

For a point release, VMware NSX-T 3.1 is packed with a bunch of major features. One of these is modular migration, which is making its debut with this release. Customers had asked for an automated way to migrate just firewall rules and groups; modular migration, a new feature of Migration Coordinator, addresses exactly that request. 

What’s Migration Coordinator?  

Taking a step back, Migration Coordinator is a tool that was introduced almost 18 months ago, with NSX-T 2.4, to enable customers to migrate from NSX for vSphere to NSX-T Data Center. It’s a free tool built into NSX-T Data Center that enables customers to migrate everything — from edges, to compute, to workloads — in an automated fashion and with a workflow that is similar to an in-place upgrade on existing hardware. This model of migration is called “in-place. 

From a resource perspective, in-place migration only needs enough resources to host NSX-T manager appliances and edges along with enough capacity per cluster to be Continue reading

Spotlight on NSX Performance at VMworld 2020

As we ramp up towards one of the premiere online tech events — in one of the most extraordinary years of a lifetime — I would like to shine a spotlight on what is being planned around NSX performance during this year’s virtual conference to help you get the most out of the event. VMWorld 2020 is right around the corner — and for the first time in two decades, it’s free! So, Register Now if you haven’t done so already!

NSX Performance Thus Far

Over the years, we’ve looked at the NSX performance numbers with and without hardware-level features, such as Geneve Offload and Geneve Rx Filters, that are key to optimal performance. If these topics are new to you, I would encourage reading up on the performance section of the NSX-T Reference Design Guide for a working knowledge of NSX-T performance before attending this year’s NSX-T Performance Session at VMworld.

NSX-T Performance Session at VMworld 2020

Given the virtual format of this year’s NSX-T Performance Session, I’ve decided to take a slightly different approach. Not only will I share performance numbers, but I’ll also demonstrate how different hardware-level features influence performance, and I’ll discuss feature and tuning Continue reading

NSX for vSphere to NSX-T Migration Resources at VMworld 2020

VMworld, the industry’s largest virtualization-specific event, is right around the corner! As you get ready for VMworld, this blog is your resource for key sessions around migrating from NSX for vSphere to NSX-T. And, via the comments below, this blog is also your channel to connect back with us if you have any questions, need further clarifications, or would like a follow up call on migration strategies.

NSX for vSphere to NSX-T Migration Resources at VMworld 2020

Learn from the Experts at VMworld

So, you’re on NSX for vSphere and you’ve been coming across all the use cases addressed by NSX-T. To take advantage of those use cases, you decide you want to move to NSX-T. And you’re wondering:

  1. Are there any VMware-supported built-in tools?
  2. Can I do this by myself?
  3. Is there a migration process that resembles upgrading?
  4. Can this be done without adding net-new hardware?

We Answer Those Questions At VMworld Breakout Sessions

Join us at the VMworld breakout session VCNC1150: Migrating from NSX for vSphere to NSX-T Data Center Using Migration Coordinator as we explore various migration approaches and dive into a detailed demo of Migration Coordinator. Designed to provide the simple experience of an upgrade, Migration Coordinator is a built-in tool that allows our customers Continue reading

How to Use Migration Coordinator’s Automated Maintenance Mode

Migrate from VMware NSX for vSphere to NSX-T with Minimal Downtime

In order to help easily migrate from NSX for vSphere to NSX-T, with minimal downtime, the latest release of VMware NSX-T 3.0 introduces Maintenance Mode to NSX-T Migration Coordinator (a tool that has been built into NSX-T since the 2.4 release).  The Migration Coordinator tool is designed to run in-place on the same hardware that is running NSX for vSphere, and swap out NSX for vSphere bits with NSX-T.

This blog post is a follow up to the previous blog, Migration from VMware NSX for vSphere to NSX-T,  which covers Migration Coordinator. For more details on the Migration Process, please check out the previous blog.  This blog focuses on the Maintenance Mode feature which is part of the NSX-T 3.0 release.

What is Migration Coordinator?

Migration Coordinator is a tool that runs on NSX-T Manager. Its disabled by default since migrating from NSX for vSphere to NSX should only be a one-time task.

How to Enable Migration Coordinator

To enable Migration Coordinator, simply log in to NSX Manager via SSH and run the command “start service migration-coordinator”.

Enabling Migration Coordinator via SSH

 

Note: This command is also Continue reading

Migration from VMware NSX for vSphere to NSX-T

Migration to VMware NSX-T Data Center (NSX-T) is top of mind for customers who are on NSX for vSphere (NSX-V). Broadly speaking, there are two main methods to migrate from NSX for vSphere to NSX-T Data Center: In Parallel Migration and In Place Migration. This blog post is a high-level overview of the above two approaches to migration.

2 Methods for VMware NSX Migration

Customers could take one of two approaches for migration.

In Parallel Migration:

In this method, NSX-T infrastructure is deployed in parallel along with the existing NSX-V based infrastructure.  While some components of NSX-V and NSX-T, such as management, could coexist, compute clusters running the workloads would be running on its own hardware.  This could be net new hardware or reclaimed unused hardware from NSX-V.

Migration of the workload in this approach could take couple of different approaches.

  • Cattle:  New workloads are deployed on NSX-T and the older workloads are allowed to die over time.
  • Pets:  Lift and shift workloads over to the new NSX-T infrastructure.

In Place Migration

There is simpler method though!  A method that doesn’t require dedicated hardware.  It’s an in place migration approach.  Curious?   This method uses Continue reading

Myth Busted: Who Says Software Based Networking Performance Does Not Match Physical Networking?

100 Gbps Performance with NSX Data Center

NSX Data Center has shown for some time now (see VMworld 2016 NSX Performane Session (NET 8030) that it can drive upwards of 100G of throughput per node for typical data center workloads. In that VMworld session, we ran a live demo showing the throughput being limited by the actual physical ports on the host, which were 2 x 40 Gbps, and not by NSX Data Center.

Typically, in physical networking, performance is measured in raw packets per seconds to assure variety of traffic at variable packet sizes be forwarded between multiple physical ports. While in virtualized data center this is not a case, as hypervisor hosts only have to satisfy few uplinks, typically no more than four physical links. In addition, most of the virtualized workload use TCP protocol. In that case. ESXi hypervisor fowards the TCP data segments in highly optimized way, thus not always based on number of packets transferred but the amount of data segment forwarded in software. In typical data center workloads, TCP optimizations such as TSO, LRO and RSS or Rx/Tx Filters help drive sufficient throughput at hardly any CPU cost. TSO/LRO help move large amounts of Continue reading