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Category Archives for "Network World Tech Primers"

How to fix Wi-Fi interference

Since Wi-Fi transmits over the airwaves, it’s of course much more susceptible to interference than the wired network. There can be interference from your own network or neighbor's, non-Wi-Fi wireless devices, microwaves, and even radar systems. Because there are so many possibilities, tracking down or fixing the interference can be quite a task, but knowing where to start can help.

The symptoms of interference issues can easily be mistaken for symptoms of other, more apparent problems such as poor Wi-Fi coverage. If so, maybe you blindly add more access points (AP) and, not knowing that you already had interference, that can actually cause more interference. So, try to find the root causes of any symptoms and be very intentional about the changes you make.

To read this article in full, please click here

How to fix Wi-Fi interference

Since Wi-Fi transmits over the airwaves, it’s of course much more susceptible to interference than the wired network. There can be interference from your own network or neighbor's, non-Wi-Fi wireless devices, microwaves, and even radar systems. Because there are so many possibilities, tracking down or fixing the interference can be quite a task, but knowing where to start can help.

The symptoms of interference issues can easily be mistaken for symptoms of other, more apparent problems such as poor Wi-Fi coverage. If so, maybe you blindly add more access points (AP) and, not knowing that you already had interference, that can actually cause more interference. So, try to find the root causes of any symptoms and be very intentional about the changes you make.

To read this article in full, please click here

Why dynamic mapping is changing network troubleshooting for the better

Effective network troubleshooting requires experience and a detailed understanding of a network’s design. And while many great network engineers possess both qualities, they still face the daunting challenge of manual data collection and analysis.

The storage and backup industries have long been automated, yet, for the most part, automation has alluded the network, forcing engineering teams to troubleshoot and map networks manually. Estimates from a NetBrain poll indicate that network engineers spend 80% of their troubleshooting time collecting data and only 20% analyzing it. With the cost of downtime only getting more expensive, an opportunity to significantly reduce the time spent collecting data is critical.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Why dynamic mapping is changing network troubleshooting for the better

Effective network troubleshooting requires experience and a detailed understanding of a network’s design. And while many great network engineers possess both qualities, they still face the daunting challenge of manual data collection and analysis.

The storage and backup industries have long been automated, yet, for the most part, automation has alluded the network, forcing engineering teams to troubleshoot and map networks manually. Estimates from a NetBrain poll indicate that network engineers spend 80% of their troubleshooting time collecting data and only 20% analyzing it. With the cost of downtime only getting more expensive, an opportunity to significantly reduce the time spent collecting data is critical.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Why dynamic mapping is changing network troubleshooting for the better

Effective network troubleshooting requires experience and a detailed understanding of a network’s design. And while many great network engineers possess both qualities, they still face the daunting challenge of manual data collection and analysis.

The storage and backup industries have long been automated, yet, for the most part, automation has alluded the network, forcing engineering teams to troubleshoot and map networks manually. Estimates from a NetBrain poll indicate that network engineers spend 80% of their troubleshooting time collecting data and only 20% analyzing it. With the cost of downtime only getting more expensive, an opportunity to significantly reduce the time spent collecting data is critical.

To read this article in full, please click here

How to use blockchain: Following an asset through its lifecycle to learn more

This contributed piece has been edited and approved by Network World editors

Possession is nine-tenths of the law, right?  But thanks to blockchain, this old adage may no longer be a viable way to settle property disputes.

Artists and enterprises alike have long struggled to prove ownership of their work after it has been disseminated, especially when it is uploaded online. What if there was a way to use technology to reliably track asset provenance with absolute certainty, from creation to marketplace and beyond?  The reality is that this is already possible with the help of blockchain, and the benefits to the enterprise are many.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How to use blockchain: Following an asset through its lifecycle to learn more

This contributed piece has been edited and approved by Network World editors

Possession is nine-tenths of the law, right?  But thanks to blockchain, this old adage may no longer be a viable way to settle property disputes.

Artists and enterprises alike have long struggled to prove ownership of their work after it has been disseminated, especially when it is uploaded online. What if there was a way to use technology to reliably track asset provenance with absolute certainty, from creation to marketplace and beyond?  The reality is that this is already possible with the help of blockchain, and the benefits to the enterprise are many.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How to use blockchain: Following an asset through its lifecycle to learn more

This contributed piece has been edited and approved by Network World editors

Possession is nine-tenths of the law, right?  But thanks to blockchain, this old adage may no longer be a viable way to settle property disputes.

Artists and enterprises alike have long struggled to prove ownership of their work after it has been disseminated, especially when it is uploaded online. What if there was a way to use technology to reliably track asset provenance with absolute certainty, from creation to marketplace and beyond?  The reality is that this is already possible with the help of blockchain, and the benefits to the enterprise are many.

To read this article in full, please click here

What has OpenStack done for me lately? The next 5 issues to address

This contributed piece has been edited and approved by Network World editors

OpenStack has been on a roll, seeing increased adoption across the business world, highlighted by major deployments from leading organizations like Verizon, BBVA, and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, as well as continued growth in the contributing community. But what’s next?

While it’s nice to see the success of OpenStack in the enterprise, the community cannot rest on its proverbial laurels. Here’s what the OpenStack community and ecosystem need to accomplish next:

* Containers, containers and ... containers.  OpenStack isn’t the hottest open source technology on the block anymore, that title is now owned by Linux containers. An application packaging technology that allows for greater workload flexibility and portability, support for containerized applications will be key to OpenStack moving forward, especially as enterprise interest intersects both Linux containers and OpenStack.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

What has OpenStack done for me lately? The next 5 issues to address

This contributed piece has been edited and approved by Network World editors

OpenStack has been on a roll, seeing increased adoption across the business world, highlighted by major deployments from leading organizations like Verizon, BBVA, and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, as well as continued growth in the contributing community. But what’s next?

While it’s nice to see the success of OpenStack in the enterprise, the community cannot rest on its proverbial laurels. Here’s what the OpenStack community and ecosystem need to accomplish next:

* Containers, containers and ... containers.  OpenStack isn’t the hottest open source technology on the block anymore, that title is now owned by Linux containers. An application packaging technology that allows for greater workload flexibility and portability, support for containerized applications will be key to OpenStack moving forward, especially as enterprise interest intersects both Linux containers and OpenStack.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

What has OpenStack done for me lately? The next 5 issues to address

This contributed piece has been edited and approved by Network World editors

OpenStack has been on a roll, seeing increased adoption across the business world, highlighted by major deployments from leading organizations like Verizon, BBVA, and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, as well as continued growth in the contributing community. But what’s next?

While it’s nice to see the success of OpenStack in the enterprise, the community cannot rest on its proverbial laurels. Here’s what the OpenStack community and ecosystem need to accomplish next:

* Containers, containers and ... containers.  OpenStack isn’t the hottest open source technology on the block anymore, that title is now owned by Linux containers. An application packaging technology that allows for greater workload flexibility and portability, support for containerized applications will be key to OpenStack moving forward, especially as enterprise interest intersects both Linux containers and OpenStack.

To read this article in full, please click here

WiFi’s evolving role in IoT

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

Internet of Things applications have diverse connectivity requirements in terms of range, data throughput, energy efficiency and device cost. WiFi is often an obvious choice because in-building WiFi coverage is almost ubiquitous, but it is not always the appropriate choice.  This article examines the role WiFi can play and two emerging IEEE standards, 802.11ah and 802.11ax.

Data transfer requirements for IoT vary from small, intermittent payloads like utility meters to large amounts of continuous data such as real-time video surveillance. Range requirements can span from very short distances for wearables to several kilometers for weather and agriculture applications.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

WiFi’s evolving role in IoT

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

Internet of Things applications have diverse connectivity requirements in terms of range, data throughput, energy efficiency and device cost. WiFi is often an obvious choice because in-building WiFi coverage is almost ubiquitous, but it is not always the appropriate choice.  This article examines the role WiFi can play and two emerging IEEE standards, 802.11ah and 802.11ax.

Data transfer requirements for IoT vary from small, intermittent payloads like utility meters to large amounts of continuous data such as real-time video surveillance. Range requirements can span from very short distances for wearables to several kilometers for weather and agriculture applications.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

WiFi’s evolving role in IoT

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

Internet of Things applications have diverse connectivity requirements in terms of range, data throughput, energy efficiency and device cost. WiFi is often an obvious choice because in-building WiFi coverage is almost ubiquitous, but it is not always the appropriate choice.  This article examines the role WiFi can play and two emerging IEEE standards, 802.11ah and 802.11ax.

Data transfer requirements for IoT vary from small, intermittent payloads like utility meters to large amounts of continuous data such as real-time video surveillance. Range requirements can span from very short distances for wearables to several kilometers for weather and agriculture applications.

To read this article in full, please click here

Comparing the performance of popular public DNS providers

ThousandEyes, a network intelligence company with the ability to monitor performance from hundreds of vantage points across the Internet, has insight into a variety of services across the globe, including public DNS service providers.  In this article we’ll dive into our results from testing 10 of the most popular public DNS resolvers, with the goal of helping you make informed conclusions about your choice of provider. We observed a wide range of performance across different services, both globally and from region to region.

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the internet’s system for converting alphabetic web addresses into numeric IP addresses. If a given service’s DNS records are unavailable, the service is effectively down and inaccessible to everyone.  DNS can also have a substantial impact on page load time and web page performance. While it’s just the first step of many in the page load process (see the below image), any increase in DNS lookup time will directly increase load times. DNS lookup time, in turn, is directly affected by latency to the DNS server.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Comparing the performance of popular public DNS providers

ThousandEyes, a network intelligence company with the ability to monitor performance from hundreds of vantage points across the Internet, has insight into a variety of services across the globe, including public DNS service providers.  In this article we’ll dive into our results from testing 10 of the most popular public DNS resolvers, with the goal of helping you make informed conclusions about your choice of provider. We observed a wide range of performance across different services, both globally and from region to region.

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the internet’s system for converting alphabetic web addresses into numeric IP addresses. If a given service’s DNS records are unavailable, the service is effectively down and inaccessible to everyone.  DNS can also have a substantial impact on page load time and web page performance. While it’s just the first step of many in the page load process (see the below image), any increase in DNS lookup time will directly increase load times. DNS lookup time, in turn, is directly affected by latency to the DNS server.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Comparing the performance of popular public DNS providers

ThousandEyes, a network intelligence company with the ability to monitor performance from hundreds of vantage points across the Internet, has insight into a variety of services across the globe, including public DNS service providers.  In this article we’ll dive into our results from testing 10 of the most popular public DNS resolvers, with the goal of helping you make informed conclusions about your choice of provider. We observed a wide range of performance across different services, both globally and from region to region.

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the internet’s system for converting alphabetic web addresses into numeric IP addresses. If a given service’s DNS records are unavailable, the service is effectively down and inaccessible to everyone.  DNS can also have a substantial impact on page load time and web page performance. While it’s just the first step of many in the page load process (see the below image), any increase in DNS lookup time will directly increase load times. DNS lookup time, in turn, is directly affected by latency to the DNS server.

To read this article in full, please click here

Threat detection automation won’t solve all your problems

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

A recent Network World article argued that automated threat detection (TD) is more important than automated incident response (IR). But the piece was predicated on flawed and misguided information.

The article shared an example of a financial institution in which analysts investigated 750 alerts per month only to find two verified threats. The piece claimed that, in this scenario, automated IR could only be applied to the two verified threat instances, therefore making automated threat detection upstream a more important capability by “orders of magnitude.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Threat detection automation won’t solve all your problems

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

A recent Network World article argued that automated threat detection (TD) is more important than automated incident response (IR). But the piece was predicated on flawed and misguided information.

The article shared an example of a financial institution in which analysts investigated 750 alerts per month only to find two verified threats. The piece claimed that, in this scenario, automated IR could only be applied to the two verified threat instances, therefore making automated threat detection upstream a more important capability by “orders of magnitude.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Threat detection automation won’t solve all your problems

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

A recent Network World article argued that automated threat detection (TD) is more important than automated incident response (IR). But the piece was predicated on flawed and misguided information.

The article shared an example of a financial institution in which analysts investigated 750 alerts per month only to find two verified threats. The piece claimed that, in this scenario, automated IR could only be applied to the two verified threat instances, therefore making automated threat detection upstream a more important capability by “orders of magnitude.”

To read this article in full, please click here

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