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Category Archives for "Network World SDN"

Is your network AI as smart as you think?

Network-operations types tell me that, in the future, AI is going to manage their networks. They also tell me that their vendors told them that very same thing. The good news is that’s sort-of-true. The bad news is the same; with emphasis on the qualifier “sort-of”. To get the most from AI network management, you have to navigate out of that hazy “sort-of” zone, and you do it by thinking about ants and farmers.Ants can build wonderfully complex anthills, with all manner of interconnecting tunnels and levels. Do the worker ants have some mighty engineer-ant directing this process? Nope. Each of them is single-mindedly performing its own simple task, and instincts program them. There is in fact an ant-engineer, but it’s their own DNA that’s organized their work to accomplish the goal. That’s a bit like how most network AI works.To read this article in full, please click here

Cisco preps now for the hybrid workforce

Work-from employees will no longer be treated as a second-class citizen, which means they will get best-in-class technology including SD-WAN appliances, cellular backup alternatives, zero trust security support and maybe even battery backup.That’s at least part of the plan for hybrid workers now and moving forward, said Cisco’s Todd Nightingale, executive vice president and general manager of the company’s Enterprise Networking & Cloud business. “The ‘return-to-office’ concept is a myth--it’s a world we have left behind.”To read this article in full, please click here

Feds’ demand for software standards could boost enterprise security

Enterprises can look for more transparency from software vendors after the Biden Administration’s recent mandate that software bills of materials be provided by companies attempting to do business with the federal government.Software bills of materials, frequently abbreviated to SBOMs, aren’t a new concept. The idea comes from the manufacturing sector, where it’s often crucial for buyers to fully understand the components and materials that were used to make a particular piece of equipment.The 10 most powerful companies in enterprise networking 2021 For example, a train engine might contain parts that aren’t rated for certain levels of vibration stress, making it unsuitable for use on a particular type of track. The goal of an SBOM is similar, listing all the proprietary, open source, and licensed components being used in a particular piece of software, so that a buyer can review it and check whether any of those components are outdated or insecure.To read this article in full, please click here

Comcast Business rolls out wireless service for SMBs

Cable giant Comcast has extended its mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) services for consumers to small and midsize businesses under the brand Comcast Business Mobile.Comcast already provides a consumer mobility service called Xfinity Mobile. Verizon and Comcast launched the Xfinity Mobile service in 2017. Like Xfinity Mobile, Comcast Business Mobile offers 4G and 5G coverage from Verizon’s mobile network as well as Wi-Fi hotspots to fill in coverage.The service offers Comcast Business Internet customers up to 10 lines with no line access fees. Customers are required to get broadband service from Comcast.There's an unlimited plan that supports graduated pricing, starting at $45 per month for one line, $30 per line per month for four lines, and $24 per line per month for 10 lines. Comcast describes the unlimited plan as ideal for on-the-go employees who may not be within Wi-Fi range and need cellular data.To read this article in full, please click here

FAQ: What in the wireless world is CBRS?

First off, CBRS is an acronym for Citizens Broadband Radio Service, and the upshot for IT pros is that it’s enabling enterprises to build their own private 4G/5G networks and result in improved 4G/5G offerings from service providers. Here’s a primer on CBRS—because you are going to want to know about this.CB, as in CB radio? No, good buddy, this has nothing to do with the Citizens’ Band radio service used by truckers for two-way voice communications and that lives in the 27MHz band in the US. CBRS lives in the 3.5GHz band.To read this article in full, please click here

IBM upgrades its Big Iron OS for better cloud, security, and AI support

IBM continues to fine-tune its mainframe to keep it attractive to enterprise users interested in keeping the Big Iron in their cloud and AI-application development plans.The company released a new version of the mainframe operating system—z/OS V2.5—that includes beefed-up support for containers, AI, and security.Chip shortage will hit hardware buyers for months to years According to IBM, applications are at the heart of transactional and batch workloads running on z/OS. Fundamentally, developing new applications while modernizing existing applications is part of the digital transformation occurring in many enterprises.To read this article in full, please click here

Xilinx launches Versal HBM processors for the data center

Xilinx continues to be arguably the most productive chip maker in the Valley with the introduction of the Versal HBM adaptive compute acceleration platform (ACAP), the latest in its Versal processor portfolio.Xilinx is known as a FPGA company, but the Versal line is so much more than that. Versal is the mashup of many different processor technologies into one die. Of course it has the FPGA programmable logic gates, but it also has Arm cores for applications and real-time processing, intelligent engines (AI blocks, DSPs), and I/O (PCIe Gen 5, CXL). The family ranges from the high-end Premium edition to the Versal AI Edge processors.To read this article in full, please click here

Is SD-WAN out to kill MPLS?

There is arguably no networking technology surrounded by more hype than software defined WANs (SD-WAN), and much of it is well deserved. SD-WAN resources What is SD-WAN and what does it mean for networking, security, cloud? 10 SD-WAN features you’re probably not using but should be SD-WAN may be the key to smart network services SD-WAN and analytics: A marriage made for the new normal Native SD-WAN monitoring tools are not enough, survey says A significant number of network professionals either have an SD-WAN deployment underway or on their near-term roadmap. The reason is that SD-WAN architecture is optimized for cloud computing while legacy WANs were designed when client-server computing was the norm.To read this article in full, please click here

HPE servers will ship in liquid-cooled chassis

Iceotope Technologies will offer HPE ProLiant servers in Iceotope’s self-contained liquid cooled chassis, which can run in enterprise data centers and is ruggedized to operate in extreme edge scenarios as well.The Ku:l chassis combines Iceotope's immersion liquid-cooling technology in Avnet racks and EcoStruxure management technology from Schneider Electric. It supports standard server boards in a 1U immersion cooling tray from Iceotope.Chip shortage will hit hardware buyers for months to years In an enterprise data center, the Ku:l chassis can add function without without adding load to the existing cooling systems since it is entirely self-contained. At the same time it is rugged enough for extreme edge environments that might damage standard IT equipment. The chassis provides zero-touch operation with advanced out-of-band management for complete remote control of the entire system.To read this article in full, please click here

What is edge computing and why does it matter?

Edge computing is transforming the way data is being handled, processed, and delivered from millions of devices around the world. The explosive growth of internet-connected devices—the IoT—along with new applications that require real-time computing power, continues to drive edge-computing systems.Faster networking technologies, such as 5G wireless, are allowing for edge computing systems to accelerate the creation or support of real-time applications, such as video processing and analytics, self-driving cars, artificial intelligence and robotics, to name a few.To read this article in full, please click here

How to dig up configuration details on your Linux system with getconf

Linux systems can report on a lot more configuration details than you likely ever knew were available. The trick is using the getconf command and having an idea what you are looking for. Watch out though. You might find yourself a bit overwhelmed with how many settings are available.To start, let's look at a few settings that you might have expected to see to answer  some important questions.Summarizing your command-line usage on Linux For starters, how long can a filename be?You can check this setting by looking at the NAME_MAX setting.To read this article in full, please click here

The 10 most powerful companies in enterprise networking 2021

When the pandemic hit last spring, employees suddenly began working from home, enterprises quickly shifted applications to the cloud, and secure remote access became critical. As we move (hopefully) beyond the pandemic, it’s clear that enterprise networking has been changed forever.Companies are looking at new technologies like SASE to combine networking and edge security into one manageable platform. Zero-trust network access has moved from the back burner to the hotseat as companies seek a more effective way to fight cyberattacks in a world where the traditional perimeter no longer exists. The lines between security and networking are blurring, with traditional security companies moving into the networking realm, and networking companies upping their security game.To read this article in full, please click here

Peering into binary files on Linux

Any file on a Linux system that isn't a text file is considered a binary file--from system commands and libraries to image files and compiled programs. But these files being binary doesn't mean that you can't look into them. In fact, there are quite a few commands that you can use to extract data from binary files or display their content. In this post, we'll explore quite a few of them.file One of the easiest commands to pull information from a binary file is the file command that identifies files by type. It does this in several ways--by evaluating the content, looking for a "magic number" (file type identifier), and checking the language. While we humans generally judge a file by its file extension, the file command largely ignores that. Notice how it responds to the command shown below.To read this article in full, please click here

Fugaku still reigns as the world’s fastest supercomputer

Fugaku, the supercomputer built by Fujitsu, remains at number one in the TOP500 list of the fastest supercomputers in the world, where it is still three times faster than the nearest competition.The contest for the fastest remains tight, with only one new entry into the top 10 on the latest list—Perlmutter, at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which is part of the US Department of Energy. It joins the list at number five and bumps down numbers six through 10 from the previous list published in November 2020.(A system called Dammam-7 dropped off the top 10.)To read this article in full, please click here

Department of Defense works to integrate battlefield intel networks

If yours is like most enterprises, it is under intense competitive pressure to understand faster, decide faster, and act faster in an increasingly dynamic environment.For businesses, that environment is the economy. But for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), the environment in which they must leverage technology and tactics against deadly adversaries is more like a battlefield. And all but the most self-aggrandizing sales directors would agree that the stakes on the battlefield are considerably higher than growing revenue and capturing market share. (Not that they are trivial!) Read more: Cisco tool taps telemetry for network, security analyticsTo read this article in full, please click here

The Department of Defense, networking, and the speed of relevance

If yours is like most enterprises, it is under intense competitive pressure to understand faster, decide faster, and act faster in an increasingly dynamic environment.For businesses, that environment is the economy. But for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), the environment in which they must leverage technology and tactics against deadly adversaries is more like a battlefield. And all but the most self-aggrandizing sales directors would agree that the stakes on the battlefield are considerably higher than growing revenue and capturing market share. (Not that they are trivial!) Read more: Cisco tool taps telemetry for network, security analyticsTo read this article in full, please click here

A startup makes IoT sensors, no batteries necessary

A startup founded by two MIT grads says that it can deploy self-powering sensors to handle low-intensity IoT tasks, eliminating the need for batteries or wired electrical supplies, adding a new level of flexibility to IoT deployments.Ben Calhoun and Dave Wentzloff are the founders of Everactive, an IoT-device manufacturing startup whose sensor modules can create their own power from a variety of sources, including indoor solar, thermal gradient differential, and vibrations. The sensors can monitor for temperature, humidity, light levels, vibration, movement, sound, pressure and gas, among other things.To read this article in full, please click here

NetApp makes big hybrid-cloud push

NetApp is making a major effort to support hybrid cloud with a batch of software announcements around storage products, converged infrastructure, and cloud-management services.The main news was the release of the latest version of its flagship ONTAP software, as well as updates to other products designed to help organizations build a better hybrid-cloud strategies.ONTAP is the operating system for NetApp’s FAS (hybrid flash-disk) and AFF (all-flash) storage arrays. The latest version, 9.9, adds automatic backup and tiering of on-premises data to NetApp’s StorageGRID object storage as well as to public clouds. It enhances multilevel file security and remote access management, supports continuous data availability for two-times larger MetroCluster configurations, and  more replication options for backup and disaster recovery for large data containers for NAS workloads. It can attain up to four times the performance for single LUN applications such as VMware datastores.To read this article in full, please click here

Rescuing a Linux system from near disaster

The more you know about how Linux works, the better you'll be able do some good troubleshooting when you run into a problem. In this post, we're going to dive into a problem that a contact of mine, Chris Husted, recently ran into and what he did to determine what was happening on his system, stop the problem in its tracks, and make sure that it was never going to happen again.Disaster strikes It all started when Chris' laptop reported that it was running out of disk space--specifically that only 1GB of available disk space remained on his 1TB drive. He hadn't seen this coming. He also found himself unable to save files and in a very challenging situation since it is the only system he has at his disposal and he needs the system to get his work done.To read this article in full, please click here