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Category Archives for "Network World Security"

IBM brings hybrid-cloud app services to z/OS mainframes

IBM has introduced a service for its mainframe customers to create a cloud environment for developing and testing applications.Wazi as a Service can be used to create z/OS infrastructure instances for development and testing z/OS application components in a virtualized, containerized sandbox. The instances would run on Red Hat OpenShift on x86 hardware. The service also includes access to z/OS systems and integrates with modern source-code management platforms such as GitHub and GitLab. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Cisco puts app-performance tools in the cloud

Cisco is taking aim at better controlling the performance and development of core applications with a new AppDynamics cloud service and open-source development tools.AppDynamics Cloud is a cloud-native service designed to let enterprises observe applications and take action to remediate performance problems.   [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Available by the end of June, the service is built to observe distributed and dynamic cloud-native applications at scale, wrote chief marketing officer of Cisco AppDynamics, Eric Schou in a blog about the new offering.To read this article in full, please click here

Cisco moves Catalyst, Nexus management to the cloud

Cisco is taking a big step toward cloud-management of both its Catalyst campus and Nexus data-center equipment.At the Cisco Live customer event this week, the company rolled out two cloud-based management services that provide more options for enterprises to support hybrid workforces. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Catalyst management in the cloud The first service, Cloud Management for Cisco Catalyst, lets customers manage and troubleshoot Catalyst 9000 switching and wireless campus and branch devices from the company’s cloud-based Meraki dashboard, which can manage and troubleshoot a wide variety of devices and networks from a single screen. According to Cisco, Catalyst customers can run a CLI command with information about their organization, and it will move management of that device over to the Meraki cloud.To read this article in full, please click here

RSA: Intel reference design to accelerate SASE, other security tasks

Intel has introduced a reference design it says can enable accelerator cards for security workloads including secure access service edge (SASE), IPsec, and SSL/TLS.The upside of the server cards would be offloading some application processing from CPUs, effectively increasing server performance without requiring additional server rack space, according to Intel. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The announcement was made at RSA Conference 2022, and details were published in a blog post by Bob Ghaffardi, Intel vice president and general manager of the Enterprise and Cloud Division.To read this article in full, please click here

RSA: Cisco launches SASE, offers roadmap for other cloud-based services

Cisco made a variety of security upgrades at the RSA Conference designed to move security operation to the cloud, improve its Secure Access Service Edge offering and offer new simplified security end point control.The biggest piece of the Cisco roll out was a new overarching security platform called the Cisco Security Cloud will include unified management and policies, and offer open APIs to help grow a multivendor security ecosystem. Cisco defines the  Security Cloud as a “multi-year strategic vision for the future of security.” It is an ongoing journey that began several years ago and Cisco will continue delivering upon the key tenets of this vision with a consistent roadmap. The cloud will be made up of existing products like Umbrella and offerings from Duo, other features will be developed in the future.To read this article in full, please click here

Who is selling Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA) and what do you get?

Enterprise interest in Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA) has soared over the past two years among organizations trying to enable secure anywhere, anytime, any device access to IT resources for employees, contractors and third parties.Much of this interest has stemmed from organizations looking to replace VPNs as the primary remote access mechanism to their networks and data. But it is also being driven by organizations seeking to bolster security in an environment where enterprise data is scattered across on-premises and multi-cloud environments, and being accessed in more ways than ever before.To read this article in full, please click here

6G cellular doesn’t exist, but it can be hacked

Arriving at a consensus on when 6G wireless will be widely available commercially is all but impossible, as this small sample size shows: Northeastern University researchers: More than five years, but probably not long after Nokia CEO Pekka Lundmark: Definitely by 2030 ABI Research: Sometime in the 2030s A magic 8-ball I found in my basement: Reply hazy, try again [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Then there is this intriguing quatrain by 16th century French physician, astrologer and renowned seer Nostradamus:To read this article in full, please click here

VPNs can complement SASE

The pandemic has accelerated the development of better ways to serve and secure remote workers, which make it a good time to rexamine VPNS.Recently VPNs have received technical boosts with the addition of protocol options that improve functionality far ahead of where they were when first invented. At the same time, new security architectures zero trust network access (ZTNA), secure access service edge (SASE), and security service edge (SSE) are making inroads into what had been the domain of remote-access VPNs.To read this article in full, please click here

SASE or SSE? Don’t let hype distract from enterprise needs

Secure access service edge (SASE) has generated a buzz over the last couple of years, particularly in light of the pandemic and its associated surge in remote employees. But SASE hasn’t quite materialized in the way Gartner – which first coined the term in a 2019 white paper – initially expected. In particular, there’s been pushback around the idea that SASE should be delivered by a single vendor, as a single integrated cloud service at the network edge.The SASE model combines network security functions with WAN capabilities, delivering the security elements in the cloud and using SD-WAN at the edge or in the cloud. Key security functions include secure web gateway (SWG), zero trust network access (ZTNA), firewall as a service (FWaaS), and cloud access security broker (CASB).To read this article in full, please click here

What is Nmap and why do you need it on your network?

Nmap, short for Network Mapper, is a free and open source tool used for vulnerability checking, port scanning and, of course, network mapping. Despite being created back in 1997, Nmap remains the gold standard against which all other similar tools, either commercial or open source, are judged.Nmap has maintained its preeminence because of the large community of developers and coders who help to maintain and update it. The Nmap community reports that the tool, which anyone can get for free, is downloaded several thousand times every week.To read this article in full, please click here

8 questions to ask vendors about Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA)

The increased deployment of core business applications in the cloud and the shift to remote work brought on by the pandemic have obliterated any notion of the traditional “corporate moat” style of security.Today’s hybrid workplace, where employees are on the road, working from home and maybe visiting the office once or twice a week, has forced network and security teams to adopt a more flexible approach to managing the network, identities, and authentication.Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA) has emerged as the preferred approach to address today’s security challenges. The concept is relatively simple: Instead of building a layered perimeter defense of firewalls, IDS/IPSes and anti-virus software, Zero Trust assumes that every user or device is untrusted until it becomes sufficiently verified.To read this article in full, please click here

Google Cloud launches services to bolster open-source security, simplify zero-trust rollouts

Google Cloud is rolling out new security services designed to address enterprise challenges including securing open-source software and accelerating the adoption of zero-trust architectures.At its annual Google Cloud Security Summit, the company said it's building on its Invisible Security effort, which promises to bake security into tools and services that enterprises and other customers use most.One example is a new service called Assured Open Source Software (Assured OSS), which is aimed at making it easier for organizations to securely manage their open-source dependencies."Today patching security vulnerabilities in open source software often feels like a high-stakes game of whack-a-mole: fix one, and two more pop up," wrote Sunil Potti, vice president and general manager of Google Cloud Security, in a blog about the new services. "This helps explain research done by Sonatype software that shows that there’s a 650% year-over-year increase in cyberattacks aimed at open source software (OSS) suppliers."To read this article in full, please click here

Google Cloud boosts open-source security, simplifies zero-trust rollouts

Google Cloud is rolling out new security services designed to address enterprise challenges including securing open-source software and accelerating the adoption of zero-trust architectures.At its annual Google Cloud Security Summit, the company said it's building on its Invisible Security effort, which promises to bake security into tools and services that enterprises and other customers use most.One example is a new service called Assured Open Source Software (Assured OSS), which is aimed at making it easier for organizations to securely manage their open-source dependencies."Today patching security vulnerabilities in open source software often feels like a high-stakes game of whack-a-mole: fix one, and two more pop up," wrote Sunil Potti, vice president and general manager of Google Cloud Security, in a blog about the new services. "This helps explain research done by Sonatype software that shows that there’s a 650% year-over-year increase in cyberattacks aimed at open source software (OSS) suppliers."To read this article in full, please click here

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