Ann Bednarz

Author Archives: Ann Bednarz

What is a SAN and how does it differ from NAS?

A storage area network (SAN) is a dedicated, high-speed network that provides access to block-level storage. SANs were adopted to improve application availability and performance by segregating storage traffic from the rest of the LAN. SANs enable enterprises to more easily allocate and manage storage resources, achieving better efficiency. “Instead of having isolated storage capacities across different servers, you can share a pool of capacity across a bunch of different workloads and carve it up as you need. It’s easier to protect, it’s easier to manage,” says Scott Sinclair, senior analyst with Enterprise Strategy Group.To read this article in full, please click here

What is a SAN and how does it differ from NAS?

A storage area network (SAN) is a dedicated, high-speed network that provides access to block-level storage. SANs were adopted to improve application availability and performance by segregating storage traffic from the rest of the LAN. SANs enable enterprises to more easily allocate and manage storage resources, achieving better efficiency. “Instead of having isolated storage capacities across different servers, you can share a pool of capacity across a bunch of different workloads and carve it up as you need. It’s easier to protect, it’s easier to manage,” says Scott Sinclair, senior analyst with Enterprise Strategy Group.To read this article in full, please click here

What is a SAN and how does it differ from NAS?

A storage area network (SAN) is a dedicated, high-speed network that provides access to block-level storage. SANs were adopted to improve application availability and performance by segregating storage traffic from the rest of the LAN. SANs enable enterprises to more easily allocate and manage storage resources, achieving better efficiency. “Instead of having isolated storage capacities across different servers, you can share a pool of capacity across a bunch of different workloads and carve it up as you need. It’s easier to protect, it’s easier to manage,” says Scott Sinclair, senior analyst with Enterprise Strategy Group.To read this article in full, please click here

JPMorgan Chase spent $2 billion on brand new data centers last year

JPMorgan Chase & Co. spent $2 billion on new data centers last year, even as the multinational investment banking and financial services company continued to move data and applications to cloud platforms run by AWS, Google, and Microsoft.The $2 billion is part of the firm’s total annual spending on technology, which amounted to more than $12 billion last year, according to details shared in JPMorgan Chase’s fourth-quarter and full-year 2021 earnings presentation. Looking at the current year, the firm expects to increase its tech spending to roughly $15 billion. IT priorities in 2022 will be consistent with prior years and will include increases in cloud capabilities, data centers, digital consumer experience, and data and analytics.To read this article in full, please click here

JPMorgan Chase spent $2 billion on brand new data centers last year

JPMorgan Chase & Co. spent $2 billion on new data centers last year, even as the multinational investment banking and financial services company continued to move data and applications to cloud platforms run by AWS, Google, and Microsoft.The $2 billion is part of the firm’s total annual spending on technology, which amounted to more than $12 billion last year, according to details shared in JPMorgan Chase’s fourth-quarter and full-year 2021 earnings presentation. Looking at the current year, the firm expects to increase its tech spending to roughly $15 billion. IT priorities in 2022 will be consistent with prior years and will include increases in cloud capabilities, data centers, digital consumer experience, and data and analytics.To read this article in full, please click here

Hybrid cloud demands new tools for performance monitoring

Network performance monitoring has become more complex now that companies have more workloads in the cloud, and network teams are finding visibility into the cloud isn’t on par with what they have into their on-prem resources. Tech Spotlight: Hybrid Cloud Hybrid cloud hurdles — and how to address them (CIO) 5 top hybrid cloud security challenges (CSO) 16 irresistible cloud innovations (InfoWorld) How to choose a SaaS management platform (Computerworld) Migration to the cloud introduced infrastructure that isn’t owned by the organization, and a pandemic-driven surge in remote work is accelerating the shift to the cloud and an associated increase in off-premises environments. Container-based applications deployed on cloud-native architectures further complicate network visibility. For these reasons and more, enterprises need tools that can monitor not only the data center and WAN but also the internet, SaaS applications and multiple providers’ public cloud operations.To read this article in full, please click here

Gartner: Diversity, equity and inclusion is key to better I&O teams

“Why should an I&O leader care about diversity and inclusion? Why do you need to be involved in this at all? What good will it do you?"The answer to her questions, Debra Logan, a vice president and Gartner fellow told a virtual conference this week, is about building better infrastructure and operations (I&O) teams.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] "I’m not asking you to have faith," she said. "I’m not asking you to do it for non-business reasons. I’m not asking you to do it because someone else told you, or because you feel it’s the right thing to do. I want you to do it because it will solve the problems that keep you up at night.”To read this article in full, please click here

6 data center trends to watch

Data-center owners and operators face increasing complexity and operational challenges as they look to improve IT resiliency, build out capacity at the edge, and retain skilled staff in a tight labor market.Meanwhile, use of the public cloud for mission-critical workloads is up, according to Uptime Institute, even as many enterprises seek greater transparency into cloud providers’ operations. Read more: Data-center recruitment needs to change to avoid staff shortagesTo read this article in full, please click here

6 data center trends to watch

Data-center owners and operators face increasing complexity and operational challenges as they look to improve IT resiliency, build out capacity at the edge, and retain skilled staff in a tight labor market.Meanwhile, use of the public cloud for mission-critical workloads is up, according to Uptime Institute, even as many enterprises seek greater transparency into cloud providers’ operations. Read more: Data-center recruitment needs to change to avoid staff shortagesTo read this article in full, please click here

5 things to know about pay-per-use hardware

Pay-per-use hardware models such as HPE GreenLake and Dell Apex are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to on-premises data centers. And interest is growing as enterprises look for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren’t a fit for public-cloud environments.The concept of pay-per-use hardware has been around for more than a decade, but the buzz around it is growing, said Daniel Bowers, a former senior research director at Gartner. “There’s been a resurgence of interest in this for about four years, driven a lot by HPE and its GreenLake program.”To read this article in full, please click here

5 things to know about pay-per-use hardware

Pay-per-use hardware models such as HPE GreenLake and Dell Apex are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to on-premises data centers. And interest is growing as enterprises look for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren’t a fit for public-cloud environments.The concept of pay-per-use hardware has been around for more than a decade, but the buzz around it is growing, said Daniel Bowers, a former senior research director at Gartner. “There’s been a resurgence of interest in this for about four years, driven a lot by HPE and its GreenLake program.”To read this article in full, please click here

5 things you nee to know about pay-per-use hardware

Pay-per-use hardware models such as HPE GreenLake and Dell Apex are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to on-premises data centers. And interest is growing as enterprises look for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren’t a fit for public-cloud environments.The concept of pay-per-use hardware has been around for more than a decade, but the buzz around it is growing, said Daniel Bowers, a former senior research director at Gartner. “There’s been a resurgence of interest in this for about four years, driven a lot by HPE and its GreenLake program.”To read this article in full, please click here

5 things you nee to know about pay-per-use hardware

Pay-per-use hardware models such as HPE GreenLake and Dell Apex are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to on-premises data centers. And interest is growing as enterprises look for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren’t a fit for public-cloud environments.The concept of pay-per-use hardware has been around for more than a decade, but the buzz around it is growing, said Daniel Bowers, a former senior research director at Gartner. “There’s been a resurgence of interest in this for about four years, driven a lot by HPE and its GreenLake program.”To read this article in full, please click here

5 things you need to know about pay-per-use hardware

Pay-per-use hardware models such as HPE GreenLake and Dell Apex are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to on-premises data centers. And interest is growing as enterprises look for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren’t a fit for public-cloud environments.The concept of pay-per-use hardware has been around for more than a decade, but the buzz around it is growing, said Daniel Bowers, a former senior research director at Gartner. “There’s been a resurgence of interest in this for about four years, driven a lot by HPE and its GreenLake program.”To read this article in full, please click here

5 things you need to know about pay-per-use hardware

Pay-per-use hardware models such as HPE GreenLake and Dell Apex are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to on-premises data centers. And interest is growing as enterprises look for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren’t a fit for public-cloud environments.The concept of pay-per-use hardware has been around for more than a decade, but the buzz around it is growing, said Daniel Bowers, a former senior research director at Gartner. “There’s been a resurgence of interest in this for about four years, driven a lot by HPE and its GreenLake program.”To read this article in full, please click here

IT vendors push on-prem, pay-per-use hardware

A flurry of announcements from hardware vendors points to a change in how enterprises are purchasing servers, storage and networking resources for their data centers and edge deployments.To entice companies to keep workloads on premises, hardware vendors including Cisco, Dell, HPE, IBM, Lenovo and others are offering consumption-based pricing for data-center infrastructure. These pay-per-use products are designed to shorten procurement cycles, allow customers to scale up or down with demand, and more economically link hardware spending with usage.HPE, for example, pledged to transform its entire portfolio to pay-per-use and as-a-service offerings by 2022, and last week, the company added to its GreenLake lineup with new data services and infrastructure. Dell, for its part, unveiled the first products in its Apex portfolio of managed storage, servers, and hyperconverged infrastructure.To read this article in full, please click here

IT vendors push on-prem, pay-per-use hardware

A flurry of announcements from hardware vendors points to a change in how enterprises are purchasing servers, storage and networking resources for their data centers and edge deployments.To entice companies to keep workloads on premises, hardware vendors including Cisco, Dell, HPE, IBM, Lenovo and others are offering consumption-based pricing for data-center infrastructure. These pay-per-use products are designed to shorten procurement cycles, allow customers to scale up or down with demand, and more economically link hardware spending with usage.HPE, for example, pledged to transform its entire portfolio to pay-per-use and as-a-service offerings by 2022, and last week, the company added to its GreenLake lineup with new data services and infrastructure. Dell, for its part, unveiled the first products in its Apex portfolio of managed storage, servers, and hyperconverged infrastructure.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell delivers lineup of on-prem, pay-per-use hardware

Dell is launching a new offering of managed storage, server, and hyperconverged infrastructure that can be deployed in a company's own data center, at edge locations or in colocation facilities, and enterprises pay for capacity as needed.Dubbed Dell Apex, it includes storage, cloud services, and a console for streamlined management. The launch coincides with the kickoff of Dell Technologies World 2021, which is being held virtually this year.Now see "How to manage your power bill while adopting AI" Pay-per-use hardware models such as Dell Apex and HPE GreenLake are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to private data centers. The concept of pay-per-use hardware isn't new, but the buzz around it is growing. Enterprises are looking for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren't a fit for public cloud environments.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell delivers lineup of on-prem, pay-per-use hardware

Dell is launching a new offering of managed storage, server, and hyperconverged infrastructure that can be deployed in a company's own data center, at edge locations or in colocation facilities, and enterprises pay for capacity as needed.Dubbed Dell Apex, it includes storage, cloud services, and a console for streamlined management. The launch coincides with the kickoff of Dell Technologies World 2021, which is being held virtually this year.Now see "How to manage your power bill while adopting AI" Pay-per-use hardware models such as Dell Apex and HPE GreenLake are designed to deliver cloud-like pricing structures and flexible capacity to private data centers. The concept of pay-per-use hardware isn't new, but the buzz around it is growing. Enterprises are looking for alternatives to buying equipment outright for workloads that aren't a fit for public cloud environments.To read this article in full, please click here

Major League Baseball makes a run at network visibility

Major League Baseball is taking network visibility to the next level.“There were no modern network-management systems in place before I came in. It was all artisanally handcrafted configurations,” says Jeremy Schulman, who joined MLB two years ago as principal network-automation software engineer. Tech Spotlight: Analytics Analytics in the cloud: Key challenges and how to overcome them (CIO) Collaboration analytics: Yes, you can track employees. Should you? (Computerworld) How data poisoning attacks corrupt machine learning models (CSO) How to excel with data analytics (InfoWorld) Major League Baseball makes a run at network visibility (Network World) Legacy systems, including PRTG for SNMP-based monitoring and discrete management tools from network vendors, allowed MLB to collect data from switches and routers, for example, and track metrics such as bandwidth usage. But the patchworked tools were siloed and didn’t provide comprehensive visibility.To read this article in full, please click here

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