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Category Archives for "Network World Wireless"

Single-core vs. multi-core CPUs

In reviewing CPU and server benchmarks, you’ve undoubtedly noticed that testing covers both single-core and multi-core performance. Here's the difference.In terms of raw performance, both are equally important, but single- and multi-core have areas of use where they shine. So when picking a CPU, it’s important to consider your particular workloads and evaluate whether single-core or multi-core best meets your needs.Single-core CPUs There are still a lot of applications out there that are single-core limited, such as many databases (although some, like MySQL, are multicore).Performance is measured in a couple of ways. Clock frequency is the big one; the higher the frequency the faster apps will run. Also important is the width of execution pipelines, and the wider the pipeline, the more work can get done per clock cycle. So even if an app is single threaded, a wider pipeline can improve its performance.To read this article in full, please click here

Digital-twin tech at crux of Schneider Electric’s $10.7B deal for Aveva

Digital-twin technology is playing an important role in the plan by French industrial automation company Schneider Electric to fully take over UK industrial and engineering software vendor Aveva, in a $10.7 billion deal announced Wednesday.Schneider has been a majority shareholder of Aveva since 2018, when it bought roughly 60% of the company’s shares through a reverse merger that made Schneider’s industrial software business a part of the UK firm. The new acquisition deal, when it closes, would see all shares of the British company transferred to Schneider.To read this article in full, please click here

Linux Foundation to blaze a path forward for mainframes

Open-source software development will be a key component to keeping the mainframe a vibrant part of current and future enterprise architectures.With that in mind the Open Mainframe Project, part of the Linux Foundation, this week said at its Open Mainframe Summit that it was forming a working group to promote mainframe-modernization efforts and that it had acqured its own Big Iron to spur future development. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The working group will create a common definition and framework defining what mainframe modernization should look like and promote open-source development on the Big Iron.To read this article in full, please click here

Former Broadcom engineer gets eight months in prison for trade secrets theft

A former employee of chip designer Broadcom was sentenced to eight months in prison this week by a federal district court judge after pleading guilty to charges for theft of trade secrets in May, according to an announcement from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California.Peter Kisang Kim, who worked for Broadcom as a principal design engineer for more than 20 years, quit his job in July 2020 and, after less than two weeks, took a job at a startup based in the People’s Republic of China. In pleading guilty, Kim admitted to accessing trade secret information from Broadcom related to the testing and design of the company’s Trident family of chipsets, which are designed for use in network switches and cloud-based networking equipment.To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: HPE (Aruba) Named an SD-WAN Magic Quadrant Leader 5 Years in a Row

By Jeff Olson, Director of SD-WAN Product and Technical Marketing, at Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company.We are honored to share that Gartner® has recognized HPE (Aruba) as a Leader in the 2022 Gartner Magic Quadrant for SD-WAN for the fifth year in a row. HPE (Aruba) is one of only two companies to be named a Leader in the Gartner SD-WAN Magic Quadrant all five years.In the Magic Quadrant for SD-WAN report, formerly named Magic Quadrant for WAN Edge, Gartner evaluated vendors based on two primary criteria: Completeness of Vision and Ability to Execute. The report includes a summary of each vendor, as well as an assessment of each vendor’s strengths and cautions.To read this article in full, please click here

Survey: Outages, staffing challenge data centers

Data-centers are working to improve the resiliency of their physical infrastructure, avoid increasingly expensive outages, and recruit skilled staff in a competitive labor market. Meanwhile, many aren’t tracking critical environmental metrics, even as they face looming sustainability requirements.These are some of the highlights of Uptime’s Institute's 12th annual Global Data Center Survey, which tracks trends in capacity, tech adoption, and staffing.To read this article in full, please click here

Kyndryl service integrates, automates infrastructure resources

Kyndryl has launched an infrastructure-management service that promises to help connect and integrate enterprise resources.Kyndryl Bridge integrates existing tools, partnerships, intellectual property, and processes the company has amassed through years of delivering infrastructure services and uses it to provide as-a-service capabilities and applications that help control and manage enterprise infrastructure.Enterprises have invested in heterogeneous tools and management platforms that don’t integrate the data they gather, and Kyndryl Bridge connects, aggregates, and centralizes that siloed performance data, said Antoine Shagoury, Kyndryl’s chief technology officer. "Then, we use our engineering expertise and AI to analyze the results in real time to provide operations personnel the intelligence they need to keep systems running at peak performance," he said.To read this article in full, please click here

Using the apropos command – even if you have to fix it first

On Linux, the apropos command helps identify commands related to some particular term. It can be helpful in finding commands you might want to use—especially when you can’t remember their names.For example, if you couldn’t remember the command to display a calendar or put your shell to sleep for a short period of time, you could try these commands:$ apropos calendar cal (1) - display a calendar $ apropos sleep sleep (1) - delay for a specified amount of time usleep (1) - sleep some number of microseconds [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Seagate launches self-healing storage technology

Seagate has upgraded its Exos Application Platform storage arrays with a new ASIC RAID controller that doubles performance and adds what Seagate calls self-healing to preserve data on defective hard disks.The Exos X models are a rebranding of the old Exos AP line. The chassis can hold a mix of traditional hard disks as well as SSDs. It comes with software that automatically moves “hot” data, which is being frequently accessed, to SSDs, while less used, “cold” data is moved to the hard drives.There are three Exos X products, defined by their size and drive-bay count. The 2U12 is a 2U chassis with 12 3.5-inch hard-drive bays; the 2U24 with is a 2U chassis has 24 drive slots; and the 5U84 with 84 slots in a 5U chassis. It has all of the standard connections: SAS, network attached SAS, Fibre Channel up to 32G, iSCSI up to 25G and a 10GBASE-T option as well.To read this article in full, please click here

IBM launches fourth-gen LinuxONE servers

IBM has unveiled the next generation of its LinuxONE server, which uses the Telum processor found in the System Z mainframe, promising both scale-out and scale-up performance and much lower power use.Officially dubbed IBM LinuxONE Emperor 4, even though it uses the System Z processor, it only runs Linux-based workloads. The system is tailored to meet the needs of Linux workloads in the data center, according to Marcel Mitran, IBM Fellow, CTO of Cloud Platform, IBM LinuxONE.He says that if a customer has Linux-based workloads running on a Z series, they will be portable to the Emperor server. The server can run Red Hat, SuSe, and Canonical Linux distros.To read this article in full, please click here

Arista extends security of EOS, doubles R3 router portfolio

Arista Networks has added security, cloud and mobile connectivity to its flagship operating system and doubled its portfolio of routing products giving enterprises new network configuration options.Arista’s Extensible Operating system (EOS) now includes encryption options called TunnelSec, a new ethernet VPN (EVPN) MPLS gateway for data center-connectivity, and improved timing-protocol support aimed at improving the handlng of mobile communications.To read this article in full, please click here

IBM, Bharti Airtel partner on edge cloud offerings in India

IBM will work with telecom provider Bharti Airtel to offer edge cloud services to organizations in India, providing a new option for companies looking to leverage edge services and keep their data in-country.The partnership, announced Wednesday, will extend across 20 of India’s largest cities, with a grand total of 120 network data centers included in the system. The idea is to offer business customers the ability to use cutting-edge new capabilities—for example, automated inspection for manufacturing, or high-level analytics for healthcare providers—without using global cloud services that might take data out of the country or having to implement that type of system completely in-house.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined perimeter: What it is and how it works

A growing number of organizations are drawing an invisible line around their internet-connected resources in an effort to keep attackers at bay. Called software-defined perimeter (SDP), it is based on the relatively simple idea of throwing a virtual barrier around servers, routers, printers, and other enterprise network components.The goal of SDP is to protect networks behind a flexible, software-based perimeter. "Advantages include stronger security and greater flexibility and consistency," says Ron Howell, principal SD-WAN and SASE architect at IT and business consulting firm Capgemini Americas.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware to pay $8M fine, settling charges it fudged the timing of backlogged orders

At a time when vendor order backlogs are at an all-time high and scrutiny of them is as well, VMware has agreed to pay an $8 million fine for disingenuous backlog reporting practices in 2019 and 2020.The Securities and Exchange Commission had charged VMware for misleading investors about its order backlog management practices, specifically stating that VMware had  moved revenue into future quarters by delaying product deliveries to customers, concealing the company’s slowing performance relative to its projections, the SEC stated. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

AWS, Harvard collaborate to advance quantum networking

Amazon Web Services is teaming with Harvard University to further quantum-networking research and development.Specifically the AWS Center for Quantum Networking (CQN) and Harvard Quantum Initiative (HQI) will team to cultivate projects to develop quantum memory, integrated photonics, and quantum applications that could help underpin future quantum networks and a quantum internet. The collaboration includes funding from AWS to upgrade the quantum-fabrication capabilities of Harvard's Center for Nanoscale Systems, which works on nanofabrication, materials characterization, soft lithography, and imaging, and that also receives funding from the National Science Foundation.To read this article in full, please click here

Arm lawsuit threatens Qualcomm chips developed by its Nuvia subsidiary.

Arm Holdings has filed suit against tech giant Qualcomm and its Nuvia subsidiary breach of license agreements and trademark infringement.The move comes just days after word broke that Qualcomm was looking to re-enter the server market, and take a swing at the client/desktop market as well. Qualcomm bought Nuvia, founded by ex-Apple SoC designers, for $1.4 billion last year. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Arm lawsuit threatens Qualcomm chips developed by its Nuvia subsidiary.

Arm Holdings has filed suit against tech giant Qualcomm and its Nuvia subsidiary breach of license agreements and trademark infringement.The move comes just days after word broke that Qualcomm was looking to re-enter the server market, and take a swing at the client/desktop market as well. Qualcomm bought Nuvia, founded by ex-Apple SoC designers, for $1.4 billion last year. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

IBM is leasing on-prem System i servers

IBM has jumped on the consumption/leasing bandwagon by offering a low-cost subscription for its Power 10-based System i.For $50 per user per month, IBM will place a quad-core POWER S1014-based System i server on-premises. Extra licenses can be acquired in lots of five. Leases are for three to five years, and IBM service the machne either remotely or on-site. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The specs are fairly modest but aimed at SMBs. The machine will come 64GB of memory, up to 6.4TB of NVMe storage, and both Ethernet and fiber channel connectivity. However, it may come with a quad-core processor, but just one core will be active.To read this article in full, please click here

IBM is leasing on-prem System i servers

IBM has jumped on the consumption/leasing bandwagon by offering a low-cost subscription for its Power 10-based System i.For $50 per user per month, IBM will place a quad-core POWER S1014-based System i server on-premises. Extra licenses can be acquired in lots of five. Leases are for three to five years, and IBM service the machne either remotely or on-site. [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The specs are fairly modest but aimed at SMBs. The machine will come 64GB of memory, up to 6.4TB of NVMe storage, and both Ethernet and fiber channel connectivity. However, it may come with a quad-core processor, but just one core will be active.To read this article in full, please click here

Checking exit codes in bash

There are quite a few exit codes used on Linux systems, though no listing you can display when you’re feeling curious. In fact, you won’t see the numeric codes unless you specifically ask for them.Instead, you will see a textual description of the problem you encountered—such as “No such file or directory”—in a context like this:$ bin/runme bash: bin/runme: No such file or directory [ Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] If you want to see the numeric exit code, you can use the echo $? command. The error message will tell you that there is no “runme” script in your bin directory. The echo $? command will respond with only a number.To read this article in full, please click here

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