Jennifer Nelson

Author Archives: Jennifer Nelson

How mainframes put muscle behind autonomous data maintenance software

Before autonomous data correction software met the mainframe, a day in my life as a DBA looked like this:2 a.m. – Diagnose a critical maintenance utility failure for a panicked night operator, re-submit the REORG job, and head back to bed.8 a.m. – Leverage a database tool to pull pertinent data for an emergency report on an internal customer’s sales region.9 a.m. – Use various database tools and review performance-related data to improve data access for developers alarmed their application performance is slowly degrading.12 p.m. – As lunch approaches, identify where I can save data for a scheduled backup, having noticed unforeseen space problems, and successfully capture my backup.To read this article in full, please click here

How mainframes put muscle behind autonomous data maintenance software

Before autonomous data correction software met the mainframe, a day in my life as a DBA looked like this:2 a.m. – Diagnose a critical maintenance utility failure for a panicked night operator, re-submit the REORG job, and head back to bed.8 a.m. – Leverage a database tool to pull pertinent data for an emergency report on an internal customer’s sales region.9 a.m. – Use various database tools and review performance-related data to improve data access for developers alarmed their application performance is slowly degrading.12 p.m. – As lunch approaches, identify where I can save data for a scheduled backup, having noticed unforeseen space problems, and successfully capture my backup.To read this article in full, please click here

Leverage the power of the mainframe to make sense of your IoT data

Companies today face incredible challenges around compliance, security and analytics, as their data lakes fill with invaluable information from ever more sensors. And tomorrow’s challenges will be no easier. As the digital age expands to cover all facets of our lives, more and more computing power will be necessary to process all of the data created.Take the explosion of Internet of Things (IoT) as an example. We have only sampled the benefits that the IoT can provide. In the words of Dan Mitchell, a retail analytics industry expert with SAS, IoT can be fundamentally described as “a network of connected physical objects embedded with sensors. IoT allows these devices to communicate, analyze, and share data about the physical world around us via networks and cloud-based software platforms.”To read this article in full, please click here

Leverage the power of the mainframe to make sense of your IoT data

Companies today face incredible challenges around compliance, security and analytics, as their data lakes fill with invaluable information from ever more sensors. And tomorrow’s challenges will be no easier. As the digital age expands to cover all facets of our lives, more and more computing power will be necessary to process all of the data created.Take the explosion of Internet of Things (IoT) as an example. We have only sampled the benefits that the IoT can provide. In the words of Dan Mitchell, a retail analytics industry expert with SAS, IoT can be fundamentally described as “a network of connected physical objects embedded with sensors. IoT allows these devices to communicate, analyze, and share data about the physical world around us via networks and cloud-based software platforms.”To read this article in full, please click here

To back up or not to back up — your data has the answer

As IBM’s general manager of analytics, Rob Thomas’s job is to understand how big data can benefit industries all around the world. In his book The End of Tech Companies, Thomas reported findings from Siemens AG that hold that by 2020, over 50 billion connected devices worldwide will produce 43 zettabytes of digital data. He also discusses how non-IT companies are becoming as well-versed at analytics as their IT peers.With so many connected devices “phoning home” and so much of what we do in our daily lives being tracked by someone somewhere in the ether, it’s no wonder our data centers are bursting at the seams. But do companies need to back up all of that data? Does every last byte of chatter need to become part of our disaster recovery (DR) strategy?To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here