The Ansible Community Team

Author Archives: The Ansible Community Team

Ansible Community Steering Committee

As we all know, Ansible is a well-adapted tool for the end-to-end automation of IT infrastructures. At the same time, due to the addition of new features and developments within the project, the Ansible community is growing at an accelerated rate. To help structure the project and also to facilitate the change in direction, we are launching a Steering Committee for the Ansible Community Project.

The Steering Committee’s role is to provide guidance, suggestions, and ensure delivery of the Ansible Community package. The committee shall be broadly representative of the planning and approval areas.

The initial Steering Committee members, selected based on their wide knowledge of and active contributions to the Ansible project, are:

  • Toshio Kuratomi (abadger1999)
  • Felix Fontein (felixfontein)
  • Tadej Borovšak (tadeboro)
  • James Cassell (cyberpear)
  • John Barker (gundalow)
  • Andrew Klychkov (andersson007_)
  • Alicia Cozine (acozine)
  • Sorin Sbarnea (zbr)
  • Jill Rouleau (jillr)
  • Brad Thornton (cidrblock)
  • Dylan Silva (thaumos)

Members of the committee will work with community users plus Ansible teams within Red Hat to assist in the composition of idea proposals/new collection inclusion requests. Rather than advocating on behalf of particular interests or perspectives, the job of the Steering Committee members is to listen carefully to their fellow community members, discuss, Continue reading

Ansible 3.0.0 Q&A

The Ansible community team has announced the release of Ansible 3.0.0 and here are the questions about the release that we’ve heard from community members so far. If you have a question that is not answered below, let us know on the mailing lists or IRC.

  • How can I stay up to date with changes in the Ansible community?

About the Ansible community package and ansible-base/ansible-core

  • Are there any changes to the Ansible language in 3.0.0?
  • There are no significant changes since the Ansible 3.0.0 package depends on the same version of ansible-base as Ansible 2.10.x.
  • Why are the versions of ansible-base/ansible-core packages diverging from the Ansible package?
    • When the Ansible Community Team set out to restructure the Ansible project, Ansible was split into the following components: 
      • The core engine, modules and plugins
      • Community and partner supported Ansible Collections of modules and plugins

The former became known as Continue reading

Announcing the Community Ansible 3.0.0 Package

Version 3.0.0 of the Ansible community package marks the end of the restructuring of the Ansible ecosystem. This work culminates what began in 2019 to restructure the Ansible project and shape how Ansible content was delivered. Starting with Ansible 3.0.0, the versioning and naming reflects the new structure of the project in the following ways: 

  1. The versioning methodology for the Ansible community package now adopts semantic versioning, and begins to diverge from the versions of the Ansible Core package (which contains the Ansible language and runtime)
  2. The forthcoming Ansible Core package will be renamed from ansible-base in version 2.10 to ansible-core in version 2.11 for consistency

First, a little history. In Ansible 2.9 and prior, every plugin and module was in the Ansible project (https://github.com/ansible/ansible) itself. When you installed the "ansible" package, you got the language, runtime, and all content (modules and other plugins). Over time, the overwhelming popularity of Ansible created scalability concerns. Users had to wait many months for updated content. Developers had to rely on Ansible maintainers to review and merge their content. These obvious bottlenecks needed to be addressed. 

During the Ansible 2.10 development Continue reading

Ansible 3.0.0 Q&A

The Ansible community team has announced the release of Ansible 3.0.0 and here are the questions about the release that we’ve heard from community members so far. If you have a question that is not answered below, let us know on the mailing lists or IRC.

  • How can I stay up to date with changes in the Ansible community?

About the Ansible community package and ansible-base/ansible-core

  • Are there any changes to the Ansible language in 3.0.0?
  • There are no significant changes since the Ansible 3.0.0 package depends on the same version of ansible-base as Ansible 2.10.x.
  • Why are the versions of ansible-base/ansible-core packages diverging from the Ansible package?
    • When the Ansible Community Team set out to restructure the Ansible project, Ansible was split into the following components: 
      • The core engine, modules and plugins
      • Community and partner supported Ansible Collections of modules and plugins

The former became known as Continue reading

Announcing the Community Ansible 3.0.0 Package

Version 3.0.0 of the Ansible community package marks the end of the restructuring of the Ansible ecosystem. This work culminates what began in 2019 to restructure the Ansible project and shape how Ansible content was delivered. Starting with Ansible 3.0.0, the versioning and naming reflects the new structure of the project in the following ways: 

  1. The versioning methodology for the Ansible community package now adopts semantic versioning, and begins to diverge from the versions of the Ansible Core package (which contains the Ansible language and runtime)
  2. The forthcoming Ansible Core package will be renamed from ansible-base in version 2.10 to ansible-core in version 2.11 for consistency

First, a little history. In Ansible 2.9 and prior, every plugin and module was in the Ansible project (https://github.com/ansible/ansible) itself. When you installed the "ansible" package, you got the language, runtime, and all content (modules and other plugins). Over time, the overwhelming popularity of Ansible created scalability concerns. Users had to wait many months for updated content. Developers had to rely on Ansible maintainers to review and merge their content. These obvious bottlenecks needed to be addressed. 

During the Ansible 2.10 development Continue reading

Announcement: Ansible Contributor Summit Europe

Blog_restructuring-the-Ansible-Project

For the past few years we’ve held a conference specifically for contributors at the same time as AnsibleFest. The additional days brought together existing contributors to the open source Ansible code base and those wanting to get involved.

It is with great pleasure that we announce a European Contributor Summit will be held in Gothenburg, Sweden, ahead of the usual summit at AnsibleFest! On March 29 we’ll be welcoming new and old contributors alike. So if you already contribute to Ansible, or would like to, but don’t know how or where to start, this event is for you.

Contributor Summit US will again be held the day before this year’s AnsibleFest event in San Diego. You can sign up for AnsibleFest updates here.

Ansible Contributor Summit is a day-long working session with the core developer team and key contributors. We’ll discuss important issues affecting the Ansible community, and you can take part in person or online. Information for remote participation will be announced about a week beforehand. There is an additional hackathon the following day, on March 30, where you can sit down with fellow contributors to work through anything specific.

The event is free to attend, although registration is Continue reading

Thoughts on Restructuring the Ansible Project

Blog_restructuring-the-Ansible-Project

Ansible became popular largely because we adopted some key principles early, and stuck to them.

The first key principle was simplicity: simple to install, simple to use, simple to find documentation and examples, simple to write playbooks, and simple to make contributions.

The second key principle was modularity: Ansible functionality could be easily extended by writing modules, and anyone could write a module and contribute it back to Ansible.

The third key principle was “batteries included”: all of the modules for Ansible would be built-in, so you wouldn’t have to figure out where to get them. They’d just be there.

We’ve come a long way by following these principles, and we intend to stick to them.

Recently though, we’ve been reevaluating how we might better structure Ansible to support these principles. We now find ourselves dealing with problems of scale that are becoming more challenging to solve. Jan-Piet Mens, who has continued to be a close friend to Ansible since our very earliest days, recently described those problems quite succinctly from his perspective as a long-time contributor -- and I think his analysis of the problems we face is quite accurate. Simply, we’ve become victims of our own success.

Success Continue reading

The Song Remains The Same

RedHat-IBM-Announcement

Now that Red Hat is a part of IBM, some people may wonder about the future of the Ansible project. Here is the good news: the Ansible community strategy has not changed.

As always, we want to make it as easy as possible to work with any projects and communities who want to work with Ansible. With the resources of IBM behind us, we plan to accelerate these efforts. We want to do more integrations with more open source communities and more technologies.

One of the reasons we are excited for the merger is that IBM understands the importance of a broad and diverse community. Search for “Ansible plus <open source project>” and you can find Ansible information, such as playbooks and modules and blog posts and videos and slide decks, intended to make working with that project easier. We have thousands of people attending Ansible meetups and events all over the world. We have millions of downloads. We have had this momentum because we provide users flexibility and freedom. IBM is committed to our independence as a community so that we can continue this work.

We’ve worked hard to be good open source citizens. We value the trust Continue reading