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Category Archives for "Network World Data Center"

AMD plots its move against Intel in the data center

Smelling blood in the water, a revitalized AMD is preparing for a big push against Intel in the data center, hoping to win back the market share it gained and lost a decade ago.AMD is promoting its Epyc processors, with 16 or 32 cores, as a lower TCO, higher performance option than Intel’s Xeon. It argues a single-socket 32-core server is cheaper up front and in the long run than a dual socket setup, which is Intel’s bread and butter.“We’re not saying single socket is for everyone, but at the heart of the market is where 50 percent to 80 percent are 32 cores per server and down, and our top single socket can do it more efficiently with lower costs and licensing. But in some cases some people will want to stay at two-socket,” said Glen Keels, director of product and segment marketing for data center products at AMD.To read this article in full, please click here

Scale Computing, APC partner to offer micro data center in a box

Hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) vendor Scale Computing and power management specialist APC (formerly American Power Conversion, now owned by Schneider Electric) have partnered to offer a range of turnkey micro data centers for the North American market.The platform combines Scale’s hyperconverged software, HC3 HyperCore, running on top of its own hardware and built on APC’s ready-to-deploy racks for a micro data center. Micro will sell the platform as a single SKU.The pre-packaged platform is entirely turnkey, with automated virtualization, power management resources, and built-in redundancy. This makes it well-suited for remote edge locations, such as cell phone towers, where staff is not immediately available to maintain the equipment.To read this article in full, please click here

Lenovo, NetApp team up vs. Dell EMC, HPE on storage

Lenovo and NetApp's storage alliance, joint venture in China, and new series of all-flash and hybrid flash products announced at Lenovo's Transform event, put them both in a much stronger position in the data center against rivals Dell EMC and HPE.The storage offerings include two familes, each subdivided into all-fash and hybrid -flash products, jointly developed by Lenovo and NetApp and available now worldwide. Several of the products support NVMe (non-volatile memory express), the extremely fast communications protocol and controller able to move data to and from SSDs via the PCIe-bus standard. NVMe SSDs are designed to provide two orders of magnitude speed improvement over prior SSDs.To read this article in full, please click here

Why banks didn’t ‘rip and replace’ their mainframes

Consumer demand for instant 24-hour access to personal bank data has taken the financial world in a new direction in less than one generation. Not only do bank IT departments now rival those of software development companies, but banking networks and infrastructure are at least as complex as a tech firm’s. Personal financial information has become one of the most protected and heavily regulated types of data in the world, and security measures and compliance programs consume the largest percentage of a financial institution’s IT budget.Knowing all this, it’s no wonder the “rip and replace” fad of the early 2000’s never materialized in the banking world. With everyone assuming the turn of the millennium meant “out with the old and in with the new,” companies were ready to rip the mainframes out of their infrastructure to prepare for whatever was next. But what came next never really materialized — or continued to prove inferior to the sheer processing power of the mainframe, which remains the only real choice for high-demand business computing.To read this article in full, please click here

Nvidia revs up AI with GPU-powered data-center platform

Nvidia is raising its game in data centers, extending its reach across different types of AI workloads with the Tesla T4 GPU, based on its new Turing architecture and, along with related software, designed for blazing acceleration of applications for images, speech, translation and recommendation systems.The T4 is the essential component in Nvidia's new TensorRT Hyperscale Inference Platform, a small-form accelerator card, expected to ship in data-center systems from major server makers in the fourth quarter.The T4 features Turing Tensor Cores, which support different levels of compute precision for different AI applications, as well as the major software frameworks – including TensorFlow, PyTorch, MXNet, Chainer, and Caffe2 – for so-called deep learning, machine learning involving multi-layered neural networks.To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Data-driven resource management and the future of cloud

Cloud adoption is undoubtedly the cornerstone of digital transformation, and for many, it is the foundation for rapid, scalable application development and delivery. Companies of all sizes and from across all industries are racing to achieve the many benefits afforded by public, private or hybrid cloud infrastructure. According to a recent study, 20 percent of enterprises plan to more than double public cloud spending in 2018, and 71 percent will grow public cloud spending more than 20 percent.Enterprises moving to the cloud are often seeking to improve employee collaboration, ensure redundancy, boost security and increase agility in application development. One of the top advantages afforded by the cloud is the ability to auto-scale in response to demand — a feature that has transformed what was once capacity planning into a more continuous cycle of capacity and resource management.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell EMC puts big data as a service on premises

To get up and running on a self-service, big-data analytics platform efficiently, many data-center and network managers these days would likely think about using a cloud service. But not so fast – there is some debate about whether the public cloud is the way to go for certain big-data analytics.For some big-data applications, the public cloud may be more expensive in the long run, and because of latency issues, slower than on-site private cloud solutions. In addition, having data storage reside on premises often makes sense due to regulatory and security considerations. [ Also see How to plan a software-defined data-center network and Efficient container use requires data-center software networking.] With all this in mind, Dell EMC has teamed up with BlueData, the provider of a container-based software platform for AI and big-data workloads, to offer Ready Solutions for Big Data, a big data as a service (BDaaS) package for on-premises data centers. The offering brings together Dell EMC servers, storage, networking and services along with BlueData software, all optimized for big-data analytics. To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined data centers need MANO

Software-defined data-center (SDDC) networks hold the promise of quickly and automatically reallocating resources to best support applications without changing the underlying physical infrastructure, but they require the proper integration of management, automation and network orchestration (MANO).To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

Newest OpenStack release comes with bare-metal installs in mind

The OpenStack Foundation has announced the general availability of the 18th iteration of its cloud platform, called OpenStack Rocky. The major new functionalities to the platform are faster upgrades and enhanced support for bare metal infrastructure.Bare-metal cloud is a term for cloud services that come with zero software. When you rent an instance on Amazon S3 or Microsoft Azure, you get a virtualized environment that is run on a hypervisor and shared with another, unknown user. This often causes performance issues, since you never know what kind of neighbor you will get each time.To read this article in full, please click here

Hardware life cycle approaches to save money, ensure network reliability

High-quality, reliable network hardware and data center cabling are requirements for a high-performing technology infrastructure and for a successful IT team that helps drive more business. It’s the life cycle for your network.However, in these days of shrinking budgets and rising demands, CIOs, IT professionals, and buyers are being pressured to do more while reducing costs. How can this be done?Having the right approach when it comes to network hardware and data center cabling is a powerful way to enable your IT organization to do a lot more while optimizing your budget. [ Read also: How to plan a software-defined data-center network ] The IT value within the life cycle There are many nuances to a hardware investment that some organizations don’t take into account. The opportunity to reduce capital expenditure (CAPEX) spends exists, but it requires incorporating pre-owned hardware into the equation.To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: The rise of EVPN in the modern data center

Over the last few years, I have been sprawled in so many technologies that I have forgotten where my roots began in the world of data center. Therefore, I decided to delve deeper into what’s prevalent and headed straight to Ivan Pepelnjak EVPN webinar hosted by Dinesh Dutt.I knew of the distinguished Dinesh since he was the chief scientist at Cumulus Networks and for me; he is a leader in this field. Before reading his book on EVPN, I decided to give Dinesh a call to exchange our views about the beginning of EVPN. We talked about the practicalities and limitations of the data center. Here is an excerpt from our discussion.To read this article in full, please click here

What to expect when the internet gets a big security upgrade

Ready or not, the upgrade to an important internet security operation may soon be launched. Then again, it might not.The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) will meet the week of Sept. 17 and will likely decide whether or not to give the go ahead on its multi-year project to upgrade the top pair of cryptographic keys used in the Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) protocol — commonly known as the root zone key signing key (KSK) — which secures the Internet's foundational servers.[ RELATED: Firewall face-off for the enterprise ] Changing these keys and making them stronger is an essential security step, in much the same way that regularly changing passwords is considered a practical habit by any Internet user, ICANN says. The update will help prevent certain nefarious activities such as attackers taking control of a session and directing users to a site that for example might steal their personal information.To read this article in full, please click here

Low-heat radios could replace cable links in data centers

Future 5G-based wireless networking equipment and data center equipment will combine antennas and the corresponding radio guts into one microprocessor unit, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology say.Integrating all of the wireless elements that one needs in a radio will reduce waste heat and allow better modulation, according to the group, which has been working on a one-chip, multiple transmitter and receiver package design. Longer transmission times and better data rates will result, they say.“Within the same channel bandwidth, the proposed transmitter can transmit six- to ten-times higher data rate,” says Hua Wang, an assistant professor in Georgia Tech's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in a news article on the university’s website about the idea.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware has edge, AI, blockchain ambitions

Fully baked products weren’t the only technologies on display at the VMworld conference in Las Vegas this week; VMware previewed three in-the-works projects related to edge computing, artificial intelligence and enterprise blockchain.The first is Project Dimension, which aims to deliver the functionality of VMware’s cloud offerings to the edge as a managed service. Project Dimension will combine the elements of VMware Cloud Foundation – including software-defined services for compute, storage, network and security, along with cloud management capabilities – in a hyperconverged form factor that’s operated by VMware. [ Read also: How to plan a software-defined data-center network ] Just as VMware Cloud on AWS manages a customer’s infrastructure in the Amazon cloud, Project Dimension will manage a customer’s on-premises data-center and edge locations, such as branch offices and warehouse sites.To read this article in full, please click here

Chip shrinking hits a wall — what it means for you

The semiconductor world is buzzing over the news that custom semiconductor manufacturer GlobalFoundries, the foundry born when AMD divested itself of its fabrication facilities, announced the sudden decision to drop its 7nm FinFET development program and restructure its R&D teams around “enhanced portfolio initiatives.”For now, GlobalFoundries will stick to 12nm and 14nm manufacturing. All told, approximately 5 percent (of roughly 18,000 employees) will lose their jobs. But it also sets back AMD, a GlobalFoundries customer, in its bid to get ahead of Intel, which has struggled for two years to get to 10nm and won’t get there until 2020.[ Learn who's developing quantum computers. ] “The vast majority of today’s fabless customers are looking to get more value out of each technology generation to leverage the substantial investments required to design into each technology node. Essentially, these nodes are transitioning to design platforms serving multiple waves of applications, giving each node greater longevity. This industry dynamic has resulted in fewer fabless clients designing into the outer limits of Moore’s Law,” said Thomas Caulfield, who was named CEO of GlobalFoundries last March, in a statement.To read this article in full, please click here

Chip shrinking hits a wall: what it means for you

The semiconductor world is buzzing over the news that custom semiconductor manufacturer GlobalFoundries, the foundry born when AMD divested itself of its fabrication facilities, announced the sudden decision to drop its 7nm FinFET development program and restructure its R&D teams around “enhanced portfolio initiatives.”For now, GlobalFoundries will stick to 12nm and 14nm manufacturing. All told, approximately 5 percent (of roughly 18,000 employees) will lose their jobs. But it also sets back AMD, a GlobalFoundries customer, in its bid to get ahead of Intel, which has struggled for two years to get to 10nm and won’t get there until 2020.[ Learn who's developing quantum computers. ] “The vast majority of today’s fabless customers are looking to get more value out of each technology generation to leverage the substantial investments required to design into each technology node. Essentially, these nodes are transitioning to design platforms serving multiple waves of applications, giving each node greater longevity. This industry dynamic has resulted in fewer fabless clients designing into the outer limits of Moore’s Law,” said Thomas Caulfield, who was named CEO of GlobalFoundries last March, in a statement.To read this article in full, please click here

Data center staff are aging faster than the equipment

What is rapidly aging and largely male? If you said the heavy metal music scene, you wouldn’t be wrong (c’est moi), but that’s not the answer in this instance. It’s data center staffing.In its recent report on data center efficiency, Uptime Institute focused primarily on outages and the improvement in power efficiency, but there were other interesting findings, such as this:Data center staff are getting older on average, and women show no interest in the job.[ Now read: 20 hot jobs ambitious IT pros should shoot for ] New skills needed for hybrid IT environments According to the report, there is a growing need for new skills in an increasingly hybrid IT environment. New skills, such as overseeing and managing SLAs for off-premises workloads, are needed, but people don’t have them. Just 35 percent of survey respondents reported that they did not have any of the hiring or staffing issues identified by Uptime.To read this article in full, please click here

Hot products at VMworld 2018

VMworld 2018Image by Getty ImagesVMworld 2018 kicked off this week in Las Vegas, where VMware and its partners are digging into virtualization, SDN, hyperconvergence, AI, containers and more. Here are some of the new products being announced and displayed at the show.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware sharpens security focus with vSphere Platinum, ‘adaptive micro-segmentation’

VMware is expanding its security range with a new version of its virtualization software that has security integrated into the hypervisor.“Our flagship VMware vSphere product now has AppDefense built right in,” VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger told the audience at VMworld 2018, which kicked off this week in Las Vegas. “Platinum will enable virtualization teams – you – to give an enormous contribution to the security profile of your enterprise.”[See our review of VMware’s vSAN 6.6 and check out IDC’s top 10 data center predictions. Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters] Announced one year ago, AppDefense is VMware’s data-center endpoint-security product, designed to protect applications running in virtualized environments. AppDefense uses machine learning and behavioral analytics to understand how an application is supposed to behave, and it detects threats by monitoring for changes to the application’s intended state.To read this article in full, please click here

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