Andy Patrizio

Author Archives: Andy Patrizio

IDC: Chinese server sales will take a hit due to coronavirus

With virtually all of China shutdown and under quarantine due to the coronavirus, the Chinese IT hardware market will suffer a temporary but significant impact in the first quarter due to demand not being met. While foreign impact is not certain, it does have the potential to spill over into other markets.IDC now predicts the total 2020 server growth rate will be reduced from original growth projections of 12.4% to 7.4%, and Q1 sales will drop 15% from the same time period last year instead of the original projection of 16.5% growth.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Storage 2020 growth rate will be reduced from 12.5% to 7.3% and Q1 will be down 20% instead of the original projection of 16.6% growth over Q1 2019. The 2020 networking growth rate has been reduced from the original 6.2% to 3.0%.To read this article in full, please click here

Japanese firm announces potential 80TB hard drives

Hard drive makers are staving off obsolescence to solid-state drives (SSDs) by offering capacities that are simply not feasible in an SSD. Seagate and Western Digital are both pushing to release 20TB hard disks in the next few years. A 20TB SSD might be doable but also cost more than a new car.But Showa Denko K.K. of Japan has gone one further with the announcement of its next-generation of heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) media for hard drives. The platters use all-new magnetic thin films to maximize their data density, with the goal of eventually enabling 70TB to 80TB hard drives in a 3.5-inch form factor.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Showa Denko is the world’s largest independent maker of platters for hard drives, selling them to basically anyone left making hard drives not named Seagate and Western Digital. Those two make their own platters and are working on their own next-generation drives for release in the coming years.While similar in concept, Seagate and Western Digital have chosen different solutions to the same problem. HAMR, championed by Seagate and Showa, works by temporarily heating the disk material during the write Continue reading

Japanese firm announces potential 80TB hard drives

Hard drive makers are staving off obsolescence to solid-state drives (SSDs) by offering capacities that are simply not feasible in an SSD. Seagate and Western Digital are both pushing to release 20TB hard disks in the next few years. A 20TB SSD might be doable but also cost more than a new car.But Showa Denko K.K. of Japan has gone one further with the announcement of its next-generation of heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) media for hard drives. The platters use all-new magnetic thin films to maximize their data density, with the goal of eventually enabling 70TB to 80TB hard drives in a 3.5-inch form factor.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Showa Denko is the world’s largest independent maker of platters for hard drives, selling them to basically anyone left making hard drives not named Seagate and Western Digital. Those two make their own platters and are working on their own next-generation drives for release in the coming years.While similar in concept, Seagate and Western Digital have chosen different solutions to the same problem. HAMR, championed by Seagate and Showa, works by temporarily heating the disk material during the write Continue reading

IBM consolidates storage products under a single brand

IBM says it is consolidating its Storwize and the Flash Systems lines of storage products under a single family, the FlashSystem, that will span from entry level to advanced. It also announced a trio of all-flash storage products, spanning a range of use cases.Eric Herzog, chief marketing officer and vice president of worldwide storage channels for IBM storage, made the announcing in a pair of blog posts here and here. He noted that different organizations have different requirements for storage, and that storage vendors have traditionally responded with unique storage platforms to meet themTo read this article in full, please click here

IBM consolidates storage products under a single brand

IBM says it is consolidating its Storwize and the Flash Systems lines of storage products under a single family, the FlashSystem, that will span from entry level to advanced. It also announced a trio of all-flash storage products, spanning a range of use cases.Eric Herzog, chief marketing officer and vice president of worldwide storage channels for IBM storage, made the announcing in a pair of blog posts here and here. He noted that different organizations have different requirements for storage, and that storage vendors have traditionally responded with unique storage platforms to meet themTo read this article in full, please click here

Server sales projected to decline 10% due to coronavirus

Global server sales had been projected to grow by 1.2% compared to the most recent quarter, but the chaos wrought by the coronavirus in China will cause sales to decline 9.8% sequentially, according to DigiTimes Research.DigiTimes is an IT publication based in Taiwan. Its proximity to Taiwanese and Chinese vendors gives it some good sources, but it can also be way off target. However, the signs are piling up that coronavirus is causing some real mayhem.For example, DigiTimes also reported that less than 20% of Chinese factory employees would return to work after an extended Lunar New Year break due to the coronavirus outbreak, and that many components plants in China have decided not to restart production until February 25.To read this article in full, please click here

Server sales projected to decline 10% due to coronavirus

Global server sales had been projected to grow by 1.2% compared to the most recent quarter, but the chaos wrought by the coronavirus in China will cause sales to decline 9.8% sequentially, according to DigiTimes Research.DigiTimes is an IT publication based in Taiwan. Its proximity to Taiwanese and Chinese vendors gives it some good sources, but it can also be way off target. However, the signs are piling up that coronavirus is causing some real mayhem.For example, DigiTimes also reported that less than 20% of Chinese factory employees would return to work after an extended Lunar New Year break due to the coronavirus outbreak, and that many components plants in China have decided not to restart production until February 25.To read this article in full, please click here

Rising sales tide lifts Intel and AMD

The fourth quarter of the calendar year tends to be great for component makers like Intel and AMD because of holiday consumer sales, but this most recent Q4 period saw them both enjoy bang-up server sales, too.Q4 was “kind of a quirky quarter,” said Dean McCarron of Mercury Research. Intel gained share overall, while AMD gained share in server, desktop and notebook markets. How? Increased demand across the board, for starters, at a time when customers aren’t typically buying servers.“The only surprise was how strong the quarter was,” McCarron said. “It was a very strong fourth quarter, multiple records were set. The main ones that count were: server revenues were records for Intel and AMD, and total CPU record.”To read this article in full, please click here

VMware licensing increase draws ire but is a logical move

VMware is increasing its CPU licensing prices for customers running CPUs with more than 32 physical cores. Effective April 2, if CPUs with more than 32 cores are deployed, then customers need to purchase additional CPU licenses.Such a change doesn't seem surprising. For the longest time, 32-core processors seemed like a pipe dream. Intel was hovering in the range of 20-odd cores, and AMD was a non-player. Then came the AMD Epyc with 32 cores in 2017, followed by Epyc 2 with 64 cores in 2019 . READ MORE: VMware’s ongoing reinventionTo read this article in full, please click here

Intel drops work on one of its AI-chip lines in favor of an other

Well, that was short.Intel is ending work on its Nervana neural network processors (NNP) in favor of an artificial intelligence line it gained in the recent $2 billion acquisition of Habana Labs.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Intel acquired Nervana in 2016 and issued its first NNP chip one year later. After the $408 million acquisition by Intel, Nervana co-founder Naveen Rao was placed in charge of the AI platforms group, which is part of Intel's data platforms group. The Nervana chips were meant to compete with Nvidia GPUs in the AI inference training space, and Facebook worked with Intel “in close collaboration, sharing its technical insights,” according to former Intel CEO Brian Krzanich.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware sees executive churn amid small layoffs

VMware is going through an annual ritual it calls “workforce rebalancing,” which has resulted in a few hundred employees being let go including with four senior executives, which might be concerning as executive churn is often a sign of trouble.On Jan. 25, the California Employment Development Department disclosed that VMware had cut 159 people in the Palo Alto office earlier in January. For a company of more than 22,000, that’s nothing, although there were likely cuts in other offices around the world as well.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “We can confirm that there have been a limited number of changes to our workforce this month,” a VMware spokesperson said via email. “This is a part of regular workforce rebalancing that ensures resources across VMware’s global businesses and geographies are aligned with strategic objectives and customer needs. We have an active employee support program to ensure, where possible, impacted employees will be redeployed to open roles within VMware. We continue to recruit in areas of strategic importance for the company.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware sees executive churn amid small layoffs

VMware is going through an annual ritual it calls “workforce rebalancing,” which has resulted in a few hundred employees being let go including with four senior executives, which might be concerning as executive churn is often a sign of trouble.On Jan. 25, the California Employment Development Department disclosed that VMware had cut 159 people in the Palo Alto office earlier in January. For a company of more than 22,000, that’s nothing, although there were likely cuts in other offices around the world as well.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “We can confirm that there have been a limited number of changes to our workforce this month,” a VMware spokesperson said via email. “This is a part of regular workforce rebalancing that ensures resources across VMware’s global businesses and geographies are aligned with strategic objectives and customer needs. We have an active employee support program to ensure, where possible, impacted employees will be redeployed to open roles within VMware. We continue to recruit in areas of strategic importance for the company.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware: sees executive churn, some layoffs

VMware is going through an annual ritual it calls “workforce rebalancing,” which has resulted in a few hundred employees being let go including with four senior executives, which might be concerning as executive churn is often a sign of trouble.On Jan. 25, the California Employment Development Department disclosed that VMware had cut 159 people in the Palo Alto office earlier in January. For a company of more than 22,000, that’s nothing, although there were likely cuts in other offices around the world as well.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “We can confirm that there have been a limited number of changes to our workforce this month,” a VMware spokesperson said via email. “This is a part of regular workforce rebalancing that ensures resources across VMware’s global businesses and geographies are aligned with strategic objectives and customer needs. We have an active employee support program to ensure, where possible, impacted employees will be redeployed to open roles within VMware. We continue to recruit in areas of strategic importance for the company.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware: sees executive churn, some layoffs

VMware is going through an annual ritual it calls “workforce rebalancing,” which has resulted in a few hundred employees being let go including with four senior executives, which might be concerning as executive churn is often a sign of trouble.On Jan. 25, the California Employment Development Department disclosed that VMware had cut 159 people in the Palo Alto office earlier in January. For a company of more than 22,000, that’s nothing, although there were likely cuts in other offices around the world as well.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “We can confirm that there have been a limited number of changes to our workforce this month,” a VMware spokesperson said via email. “This is a part of regular workforce rebalancing that ensures resources across VMware’s global businesses and geographies are aligned with strategic objectives and customer needs. We have an active employee support program to ensure, where possible, impacted employees will be redeployed to open roles within VMware. We continue to recruit in areas of strategic importance for the company.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware: Executive churn, some layoffs

VMware is going through an annual ritual it calls “workforce rebalancing,” which has resulted in a few hundred employees being let go including with four senior executives, which might be concerning as executive churn is often a sign of trouble.On Jan. 25, the California Employment Development Department disclosed that VMware had cut 159 people in the Palo Alto office earlier in January. For a company of more than 22,000, that’s nothing, although there were likely cuts in other offices around the world as well.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “We can confirm that there have been a limited number of changes to our workforce this month,” a VMware spokesperson said via email. “This is a part of regular workforce rebalancing that ensures resources across VMware’s global businesses and geographies are aligned with strategic objectives and customer needs. We have an active employee support program to ensure, where possible, impacted employees will be redeployed to open roles within VMware. We continue to recruit in areas of strategic importance for the company.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware: Executive churn, some layoffs

VMware is going through an annual ritual it calls “workforce rebalancing,” which has resulted in a few hundred employees being let go including with four senior executives, which might be concerning as executive churn is often a sign of trouble.On Jan. 25, the California Employment Development Department disclosed that VMware had cut 159 people in the Palo Alto office earlier in January. For a company of more than 22,000, that’s nothing, although there were likely cuts in other offices around the world as well.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “We can confirm that there have been a limited number of changes to our workforce this month,” a VMware spokesperson said via email. “This is a part of regular workforce rebalancing that ensures resources across VMware’s global businesses and geographies are aligned with strategic objectives and customer needs. We have an active employee support program to ensure, where possible, impacted employees will be redeployed to open roles within VMware. We continue to recruit in areas of strategic importance for the company.To read this article in full, please click here

Private equity firms are gobbling up data centers

Merger and acquisition activity surrounding data-center facilities is starting to resemble the Oklahoma Land Rush, and private-equity firms are taking most of the action.New research from Synergy Research Group saw more than 100 deals in 2019, a 50% growth over 2018, and private-equity companies accounted for 80% of them.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] M&A activity broke the 100 transaction mark for the first time in 2019, and that comes despite a 45% decline in public company activity, such as the massive Digital Reality Trust purchase of Interxion. At the same time, the size of the deals dropped in 2019, with fewer worth $1 billion or more vs. 2018, and the average deal value fell 24% vs. 2018.To read this article in full, please click here

Private equity firms are gobbling up data centers

Merger and acquisition activity surrounding data-center facilities is starting to resemble the Oklahoma Land Rush, and private-equity firms are taking most of the action.New research from Synergy Research Group saw more than 100 deals in 2019, a 50% growth over 2018, and private-equity companies accounted for 80% of them.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] M&A activity broke the 100 transaction mark for the first time in 2019, and that comes despite a 45% decline in public company activity, such as the massive Digital Reality Trust purchase of Interxion. At the same time, the size of the deals dropped in 2019, with fewer worth $1 billion or more vs. 2018, and the average deal value fell 24% vs. 2018.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel denies reports of Xeon shortage

Intel has denied reports that its Xeon supply chain is suffering the same constraints as its PC desktop/laptop business. CEO Bob Swan said during the company's recent earnings call that its inventory was depleted but customers are getting orders.The issue blew up last week when HPE – one of Intel's largest server OEM partners – reportedly told UK-based publication The Register that there were supply constraints with Cascade Lake processors, the most recent generation of Xeon Scalable processors, and urged HPE customers "to consider alternative processors." HPE did not clarify if it meant Xeon processors other than Cascade Lake or AMD Epyc processors.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel denies reports of Xeon shortage

Intel has denied reports that its Xeon supply chain is suffering the same constraints as its PC desktop/laptop business. CEO Bob Swan said during the company's recent earnings call that its inventory was depleted but customers are getting orders.The issue blew up last week when HPE – one of Intel's largest server OEM partners – reportedly told UK-based publication The Register that there were supply constraints with Cascade Lake processors, the most recent generation of Xeon Scalable processors, and urged HPE customers "to consider alternative processors." HPE did not clarify if it meant Xeon processors other than Cascade Lake or AMD Epyc processors.To read this article in full, please click here

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