Andy Patrizio

Author Archives: Andy Patrizio

The TPM chip controversy for Windows 11 is a non-issue for Windows Server

By now you’ve heard about the kerfuffle surrounding Windows 11 and its requirement for a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip, which is not standard on the majority of PCs and threatens to leave many newer Windows 10 PCs blocked from being upgraded.Normally the issues around a new version of Windows are system requirements, but here, the issue is the TPM chip. TPM is a specially designed chip that assists with security surrounding credentials. It ensures that boot code that’s loaded, such as firmware and OS components, haven’t been tampered with. It can also encrypt the drive contents to protect against theft. Microsoft is mandating that systems have TPM based on 2.0 specifications but few PCs do. Those that do ship with it have it turned off by default but it is easily activated.To read this article in full, please click here

The TPM chip controversy for Windows 11 is a non-issue for Windows Server

By now you’ve heard about the kerfuffle surrounding Windows 11 and its requirement for a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip, which is not standard on the majority of PCs and threatens to leave many newer Windows 10 PCs blocked from being upgraded.Normally the issues around a new version of Windows are system requirements, but here, the issue is the TPM chip. TPM is a specially designed chip that assists with security surrounding credentials. It ensures that boot code that’s loaded, such as firmware and OS components, haven’t been tampered with. It can also encrypt the drive contents to protect against theft. Microsoft is mandating that systems have TPM based on 2.0 specifications but few PCs do. Those that do ship with it have it turned off by default but it is easily activated.To read this article in full, please click here

The chip shortage is real, but driven by more than COVID

By now you’ve undoubtedly heard the complaining about computing parts shortages, particularly from gamers who can’t get modern GPU cards and from car makers, since new cars these days are a rolling data center.The problem is also affecting business IT but in a different way, and there are steps you can take to address the problem. The first step, though, is patience. This shortage isn’t due to staffing or fabs being out of commission, it’s that demand is so high that it’s leading to very long lead times.Chip shortage will hit hardware buyers for months to years That delay can mean 36 weeks, according to Mario Morales, program vice president for the semiconductor and enabling technologies team at IDC, with the demand for components “seeing untempered demand.”To read this article in full, please click here

The chip shortage is real, but driven by more than COVID

By now you’ve undoubtedly heard the complaining about computing parts shortages, particularly from gamers who can’t get modern GPU cards and from car makers, since new cars these days are a rolling data center.The problem is also affecting business IT but in a different way, and there are steps you can take to address the problem. The first step, though, is patience. This shortage isn’t due to staffing or fabs being out of commission, it’s that demand is so high that it’s leading to very long lead times.Chip shortage will hit hardware buyers for months to years That delay can mean 36 weeks, according to Mario Morales, program vice president for the semiconductor and enabling technologies team at IDC, with the demand for components “seeing untempered demand.”To read this article in full, please click here

Intel stumbles in supercomputer rankings, delays next-gen CPU

This week the TOP500 list of the world’s fastest supercomuters found that, once again, Fugaku is number one, benchmarking at 442 Pflop/sec, making it three times faster than the second place machine. Impressive, but also indicative that it might also be the first to break the exaflop barrier if it’s working on the right kind of problem.TOP500 pointed out that Fugaku’s score (and everyone else’s) is based on double-precision benchmarks, the most accurate floating point math calculation you can do. But much of AI and machine learning is single-precision, which can be less than half the compute power of double precision.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel stumbles in supercomputer rankings, delays next-gen CPU

This week the TOP500 list of the world’s fastest supercomuters found that, once again, Fugaku is number one, benchmarking at 442 Pflop/sec, making it three times faster than the second place machine. Impressive, but also indicative that it might also be the first to break the exaflop barrier if it’s working on the right kind of problem.TOP500 pointed out that Fugaku’s score (and everyone else’s) is based on double-precision benchmarks, the most accurate floating point math calculation you can do. But much of AI and machine learning is single-precision, which can be less than half the compute power of double precision.To read this article in full, please click here

CEO Gelsinger shakes up Intel

A new CEO invariably means a reorganization around his/her vision of things and an attempt to address perceived problems in the company’s organizational structure. In hindsight, that’s another clue that Bob Swan wasn’t long for the CEO’s job at Intel, since he never did a reorg.

Pat Gelsinger, who has been Intel’s CEO for just over four months, on the other hand, completely flipped the table with a major reorganization that creates two new business units, promoted several senior technologists to leadership roles, and saw the departure of a major Intel veteran.

The two new units: one for software and the other on high performance computing and graphics. Greg Lavender will serve as Intel’s chief technology officer and lead the new Software and Advanced Technology Group. As CTO, he will head up research programs, including Intel Labs. Lavender comes to Intel from VMware, where he was also CTO, and has held positions Citigroup, Cisco, and Sun Microsystems.

To read this article in full, please click here

CEO Gelsinger shakes up Intel

A new CEO invariably means a reorganization around his/her vision of things and an attempt to address perceived problems in the company’s organizational structure. In hindsight, that’s another clue that Bob Swan wasn’t long for the CEO’s job at Intel, since he never did a reorg.Pat Gelsinger, who has been Intel’s CEO for just over four months, on the other hand, completely flipped the table with a major reorganization that creates two new business units, promoted several senior technologists to leadership roles, and saw the departure of a major Intel veteran.Now see "How to manage your power bill while adopting AI" The two new units: one for software and the other on high performance computing and graphics. Greg Lavender will serve as Intel’s chief technology officer and lead the new Software and Advanced Technology Group. As CTO, he will head up research programs, including Intel Labs. Lavender comes to Intel from VMware, where he was also CTO, and has held positions Citigroup, Cisco, and Sun Microsystems.To read this article in full, please click here

HPE expands GreenLake services

Hewlett Packard Enterprise announced several expansions of its managed GreenLake services during its HPE Discover conference this week.GreenLake is HPE’s consumption model for hardware and services. Rather than make an outright purchase, customers determine the configuration they will need and HPE installs it, with a slight overprovisioning just in case. If the customer ends up needing more hardware capacity, it’s just turned on. Until then, it just sits there, unused, and at no charge.To read this article in full, please click here

HPE expands GreenLake services

Hewlett Packard Enterprise announced several expansions of its managed GreenLake services during its HPE Discover conference this week.GreenLake is HPE’s consumption model for hardware and services. Rather than make an outright purchase, customers determine the configuration they will need and HPE installs it, with a slight overprovisioning just in case. If the customer ends up needing more hardware capacity, it’s just turned on. Until then, it just sits there, unused, and at no charge.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel unveils new type of network accelerator chip

Intel on Monday expanded its network processor roadmap with the announcement of the Infrastructure Processing Unit (IPU). Think of it as the next step in the SmartNIC market, because Intel does.The announcement was made at the Six Five Summit 2021, where Navin Shenoy, the head of Intel's Data Center Group, announced its intention to create the new processor family specifically for cloud workloads.There has been a move toward dedicated networking chips, called SmartNICs, that offload the work of network traffic processing from the CPU, thus freeing up the CPU to do its primary task. Mellanox released one in 2019 and was soon bought by Nvidia. Xilinx released one a year later and will soon be under the ownership of AMD.To read this article in full, please click here

NetApp makes big hybrid-cloud push

NetApp is making a major effort to support hybrid cloud with a batch of software announcements around storage products, converged infrastructure, and cloud-management services.The main news was the release of the latest version of its flagship ONTAP software, as well as updates to other products designed to help organizations build a better hybrid-cloud strategies.ONTAP is the operating system for NetApp’s FAS (hybrid flash-disk) and AFF (all-flash) storage arrays. The latest version, 9.9, adds automatic backup and tiering of on-premises data to NetApp’s StorageGRID object storage as well as to public clouds. It enhances multilevel file security and remote access management, supports continuous data availability for two-times larger MetroCluster configurations, and  more replication options for backup and disaster recovery for large data containers for NAS workloads. It can attain up to four times the performance for single LUN applications such as VMware datastores.To read this article in full, please click here

NetApp makes big hybrid-cloud push

NetApp is making a major effort to support hybrid cloud with a batch of software announcements around storage products, converged infrastructure, and cloud-management services.The main news was the release of the latest version of its flagship ONTAP software, as well as updates to other products designed to help organizations build a better hybrid-cloud strategies.ONTAP is the operating system for NetApp’s FAS (hybrid flash-disk) and AFF (all-flash) storage arrays. The latest version, 9.9, adds automatic backup and tiering of on-premises data to NetApp’s StorageGRID object storage as well as to public clouds. It enhances multilevel file security and remote access management, supports continuous data availability for two-times larger MetroCluster configurations, and  more replication options for backup and disaster recovery for large data containers for NAS workloads. It can attain up to four times the performance for single LUN applications such as VMware datastores.To read this article in full, please click here

Sunlight aims at more efficient virtualization

Virtualization software is dated and does not take full advantage of modern hardware, making it extremely power-inefficient and forcing data centers to overprovision hardware to avoid poor performance.That’s the pitch of Sunlight, a virtualization-software vendor whose products take advantage of technologies that didn’t exist when Xen, KVM, VMware and Hyper-V were first developed.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “The cloud infrastructure or virtualization stacks have been designed and built 15 to 20 years ago,” said Kosten Metreweli, chief strategy officer of Sunlight. “So the big problem here is that back then, I/O, and particularly storage, was really slow. So fast forward, and we now have NVMe storage, which pushes millions of IOPS from a single device, which is orders of magnitude better than was possible just a few years ago.”To read this article in full, please click here

Sunlight aims at more efficient virtualization

Virtualization software is dated and does not take full advantage of modern hardware, making it extremely power-inefficient and forcing data centers to overprovision hardware to avoid poor performance.That’s the pitch of Sunlight, a virtualization-software vendor whose products take advantage of technologies that didn’t exist when Xen, KVM, VMware and Hyper-V were first developed.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] “The cloud infrastructure or virtualization stacks have been designed and built 15 to 20 years ago,” said Kosten Metreweli, chief strategy officer of Sunlight. “So the big problem here is that back then, I/O, and particularly storage, was really slow. So fast forward, and we now have NVMe storage, which pushes millions of IOPS from a single device, which is orders of magnitude better than was possible just a few years ago.”To read this article in full, please click here

New NVMe spec brings new support for hard drives

The new NVM Express 2.0 has been released and with it a surprise: The non-volatile memory express protocol—best known for handling SSD speeds—is now offering full-blown support for traditional hard-disk drives.This is quite unexpected because SSDs are orders of magnitude faster than traditional HDDs. [ Read also: How to plan a software-defined data-center network ] The first flash-based SSDs used SATA/SAS physical interfaces borrowed from existing hard drive-based enterprise server/ storage systems. However, none of these interfaces and protocols were designed for high-speed storage media and the SATA/SAS bus became a bottleneck for the much faster SSD.To read this article in full, please click here

New NVMe spec brings new support for hard drives

The new NVM Express 2.0 has been released and with it a surprise: The non-volatile memory express protocol—best known for handling SSD speeds—is now offering full-blown support for traditional hard-disk drives.This is quite unexpected because SSDs are orders of magnitude faster than traditional HDDs. [ Read also: How to plan a software-defined data-center network ] The first flash-based SSDs used SATA/SAS physical interfaces borrowed from existing hard drive-based enterprise server/ storage systems. However, none of these interfaces and protocols were designed for high-speed storage media and the SATA/SAS bus became a bottleneck for the much faster SSD.To read this article in full, please click here

New Cisco servers embrace hybrid cloud

Cisco has added a new class of servers to its Unified Computing System that are more flexible and outfitted with management software geared to hybrid cloud.The UCS X-Series is the first major redisign since UCS hit the market in 2009. The company says the modular hardware architecture is future-proofed because it can accomodate new generations of processors, storage, nonvolatile memory, accelerators, and interconnects as they come along. Prior UCS chassis were either blade systems for power efficiency or rack systems for expandability, but the UCS X-Series combines both in the same chassis.This means the single server type is able to support a broader range of tasks, from virtualized workloads, traditional enterprise applications, and databases to private cloud and cloud-native applications. The individual modules are interconnected into a fabric that can support IP networking, Fibre Channel SAN, and management connectivity.To read this article in full, please click here

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