Andy Patrizio

Author Archives: Andy Patrizio

Government cybersecurity agency warns of Windows Server exploit

The federal government's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued a rare emergency directive to federal government agencies to roll out a Windows Server patch within days, an indication of the severity of the exploit.The directive was issued on September 18, and agencies were given four days to apply the security update. It demands that executive agencies take "immediate and emergency action" to patch CVE-2020-1472, issued August 11.The vulnerability is in Microsoft Windows Netlogon Remote Protocol (MS-NRPC), a core authentication component of Active Directory from Windows Server 2008 to Server 2019. It has been named "Zerologon" because of how it works.To read this article in full, please click here

MemVerge ships software-defined persistent memory software

Big Memory software startup MemVerge launched its Memory Machine software designed to turn DRAM and Intel Optane persistent memory into a software-defined memory pool, bringing DRAM performance to persistent memory (PMEM).For some use cases, SSDs just aren’t fast enough. “Despite all the great advances in storage, the latency difference between memory and storage remains at more than three orders of magnitude, making this data movement inefficient,” said Alper Ilkbahar, vice president and general manager of the memory and storage product group at Intel in a conference call with MemVerge.To read this article in full, please click here

MemVerge ships software-defined persistent memory software

Big Memory software startup MemVerge launched its Memory Machine software designed to turn DRAM and Intel Optane persistent memory into a software-defined memory pool, bringing DRAM performance to persistent memory (PMEM).For some use cases, SSDs just aren’t fast enough. “Despite all the great advances in storage, the latency difference between memory and storage remains at more than three orders of magnitude, making this data movement inefficient,” said Alper Ilkbahar, vice president and general manager of the memory and storage product group at Intel in a conference call with MemVerge.To read this article in full, please click here

Arm updates Neoverse server processors with considerable performance claims

Acquisitions and defections be damned, Arm Holdings is pushing forward with its Neoverse line of server processor designs with the launch of the Neoverse V1 and N2 processor architectures.The new chips are the successors to the Neoverse N1 and E1 designs, which are used in server processors like Ampere’s Altra, Amazon’s Graviton2, and Marvel’s ThunderX2. Arm claims these chips will deliver 40% to 50% better performance than the previous generation while consuming the same amount of power.To read this article in full, please click here

Arm updates Neoverse server processors with considerable performance claims

Acquisitions and defections be damned, Arm Holdings is pushing forward with its Neoverse line of server processor designs with the launch of the Neoverse V1 and N2 processor architectures.The new chips are the successors to the Neoverse N1 and E1 designs, which are used in server processors like Ampere’s Altra, Amazon’s Graviton2, and Marvel’s ThunderX2. Arm claims these chips will deliver 40% to 50% better performance than the previous generation while consuming the same amount of power.To read this article in full, please click here

IDC reports jump in server sales, decline in storage revenue

IDC released two surveys last week with seemingly contradictory results, but there is an underlying pattern: For now, on-premises hardware sales are dipping, while cloud sales are booming.In its Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker, vendor revenue in the global server market grew 19.8% year over year in the second calendar quarter of 2020 to $24.0 billion, while worldwide server shipments grew 18.4% to nearly 3.2 million units in the same time period. READ MORE: IT employment takes a hit but overall remains healthyTo read this article in full, please click here

IDC reports jump in server sales, decline in storage revenue

IDC released two surveys last week with seemingly contradictory results, but there is an underlying pattern: For now, on-premises hardware sales are dipping, while cloud sales are booming.In its Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker, vendor revenue in the global server market grew 19.8% year over year in the second calendar quarter of 2020 to $24.0 billion, while worldwide server shipments grew 18.4% to nearly 3.2 million units in the same time period. READ MORE: IT employment takes a hit but overall remains healthyTo read this article in full, please click here

Nvidia-Arm merger faces regulatory, political, legal hurdles

Nvidia’s planned $40 billion takeover of chip-architecture firm Arm Holdings is not your typical merger. Oftentimes in a merger it’s one company taking over a weaker competitor that it has vanquished, something Nvidia knows all too well. Over its history, Nvidia has purchased several competitor GPU makers, most notably 3DFX in 2000.But here, the situation is different. First, the two companies don’t compete. Nvidia was a licensee of Arm chip design with its Tegra processor aimed at smartphones and tablets—and a rare failure for Nvidia as it never really caught on.To read this article in full, please click here

Nvidia-Arm merger faces regulatory, political, legal hurdles

Nvidia’s planned $40 billion takeover of chip-architecture firm Arm Holdings is not your typical merger. Oftentimes in a merger it’s one company taking over a weaker competitor that it has vanquished, something Nvidia knows all too well. Over its history, Nvidia has purchased several competitor GPU makers, most notably 3DFX in 2000.But here, the situation is different. First, the two companies don’t compete. Nvidia was a licensee of Arm chip design with its Tegra processor aimed at smartphones and tablets—and a rare failure for Nvidia as it never really caught on.To read this article in full, please click here

Chip maker Nvidia takes a $40B chance on Arm Holdings

After months of teasing and rumor, GPU and AI vendor Nvidia announced it would purchase Arm Holdings from its parent company SoftBank for $40 billion. The purchase includes $21.5 billion in Nvidia stock and $12 billion in cash, including $2 billion payable at signing. That will break the piggy bank because Nvidia had $10.9 billion in cash on hand as of the most recent quarter.Softbank acquired Arm in 2016 for $31.4 billion in 2016. At the time, SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son said it was an investment in the Internet of Things. But SoftBank, known for its profligate spending on acquisitions and investments, made some bad investments in WeWork and Uber, among others, and was saddled with $25 billion in debt.To read this article in full, please click here

Chip maker Nvidia takes a $40B chance on Arm Holdings

After months of teasing and rumor, GPU and AI vendor Nvidia announced it would purchase Arm Holdings from its parent company SoftBank for $40 billion. The purchase includes $21.5 billion in Nvidia stock and $12 billion in cash, including $2 billion payable at signing. That will break the piggy bank because Nvidia had $10.9 billion in cash on hand as of the most recent quarter.Softbank acquired Arm in 2016 for $31.4 billion in 2016. At the time, SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son said it was an investment in the Internet of Things. But SoftBank, known for its profligate spending on acquisitions and investments, made some bad investments in WeWork and Uber, among others, and was saddled with $25 billion in debt.To read this article in full, please click here

Lenovo introduces four new HCI solutions

Lenovo Data Center Group on Thursday introduced four new hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) products aimed at a variety of workloads, including virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), SAP HANA, Microsoft Azure, and Kubernetes.HCI products have grown in popularity because they are easily deployed and can get a variety of workloads up and running quickly. HCI is available either in hardware/appliance form or as software. HCI hardware vendors are the usual suspects – HP Enterprise, Dell, Lenovo – while the software vendors include Nutanix and VMware.Lenovo is focused on ready-to-deploy HCI solutions from both software firms. It boasts that its hardware is easy to deploy and manage with simple updates, automatic scalability and a consumption-based use model.To read this article in full, please click here

Lenovo introduces four new HCI solutions

Lenovo Data Center Group on Thursday introduced four new hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) products aimed at a variety of workloads, including virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), SAP HANA, Microsoft Azure, and Kubernetes.HCI products have grown in popularity because they are easily deployed and can get a variety of workloads up and running quickly. HCI is available either in hardware/appliance form or as software. HCI hardware vendors are the usual suspects – HP Enterprise, Dell, Lenovo – while the software vendors include Nutanix and VMware.Lenovo is focused on ready-to-deploy HCI solutions from both software firms. It boasts that its hardware is easy to deploy and manage with simple updates, automatic scalability and a consumption-based use model.To read this article in full, please click here

New Arm processor promises smart storage

Arm Ltd. last week announced the Cortex-R82, a chip that is both storage and data processing-capable, which could enable a whole new generation of storage devices that help process the data they store.Storage processor chips, such as those made by Marvell but also storage device makers like EMC, handle the I/O and disk management, but if you want to process the data, that job falls to the CPU. This means data has to be moved in and out of the drive to be processed, a job that falls to two separate devices.But there is an emerging hardware category known as computational storage where the processing is done where the data resides, rather than moving it into memory. Data is processed through various methods, like indexing and schema, eliminating the latency of data movement and freeing up the CPU. Obviously this can only be done on SSDs.To read this article in full, please click here

New Arm processor promises smart storage

Arm Ltd. last week announced the Cortex-R82, a chip that is both storage and data processing-capable, which could enable a whole new generation of storage devices that help process the data they store.Storage processor chips, such as those made by Marvell but also storage device makers like EMC, handle the I/O and disk management, but if you want to process the data, that job falls to the CPU. This means data has to be moved in and out of the drive to be processed, a job that falls to two separate devices.But there is an emerging hardware category known as computational storage where the processing is done where the data resides, rather than moving it into memory. Data is processed through various methods, like indexing and schema, eliminating the latency of data movement and freeing up the CPU. Obviously this can only be done on SSDs.To read this article in full, please click here

Marvell exits the general purpose Arm server business

Marvell Technology Group announced last week that it has decided to cancel its ThunderX3 Arm-based server processor for general-purpose server use in favor of vertical markets and the hyperscaler server market.Marvell was best known for making controllers for storage and networking devices before it bought Cavium, an Arm server developer, in 2018. The company announced the ThunderX3 in March and on paper it looked like a real monster, with 96 cores and four threads per core.To read this article in full, please click here

Marvell exits the general purpose Arm server business

Marvell Technology Group announced last week that it has decided to cancel its ThunderX3 Arm-based server processor for general-purpose server use in favor of vertical markets and the hyperscaler server market.Marvell was best known for making controllers for storage and networking devices before it bought Cavium, an Arm server developer, in 2018. The company announced the ThunderX3 in March and on paper it looked like a real monster, with 96 cores and four threads per core.To read this article in full, please click here

Alleged leaks from AMD indicate big performance gains in upcoming Epyc refresh

A German tech site claims to have internal AMD documents that show the next generation of AMD Epyc server processors will boast a significant performance gain. AMD declined to comment on the veracity of the article.Hardwareluxx posted what it said were details from internal AMD slides revealing the performance potential of AMD's next-gen server processors, codenamed “Milan,” otherwise known as Zen 3, due to ship later this year.According to the slides, Zen 3 is in many ways similar to the Zen 2 generation (aka “Rome”) currently on the market. It will be socket-compatible with the first and second generation of Epycs, so current owners can swap out the older chips for newer. It will have a maximum of 64 cores, which is the same as Rome. It will support DDR4 memory and PCI Express 4.0 interconnects, like Rome. One difference is that instead of two 16MB L3 caches, Milan will have one 32MB L3 cache.To read this article in full, please click here

Alleged leaks from AMD indicate big performance gains in upcoming Epyc refresh

A German tech site claims to have internal AMD documents that show the next generation of AMD Epyc server processors will boast a significant performance gain. AMD declined to comment on the veracity of the article.Hardwareluxx posted what it said were details from internal AMD slides revealing the performance potential of AMD's next-gen server processors, codenamed “Milan,” otherwise known as Zen 3, due to ship later this year.According to the slides, Zen 3 is in many ways similar to the Zen 2 generation (aka “Rome”) currently on the market. It will be socket-compatible with the first and second generation of Epycs, so current owners can swap out the older chips for newer. It will have a maximum of 64 cores, which is the same as Rome. It will support DDR4 memory and PCI Express 4.0 interconnects, like Rome. One difference is that instead of two 16MB L3 caches, Milan will have one 32MB L3 cache.To read this article in full, please click here

Pure Storage unveils an all-flash hybrid-storage killer

All-flash storage arrays are fairly common in the most mission-critical of environments, where response time is of the essence. But if you move a step down to where archival activity takes place, there are still plenty of hard-disk/flash hybrid storage arrays.That’s because hard-disk drives have retained one advantage over flash: capacity. HDDs from Seagate and Western Digital are pushing into the 20TB range for a whole lot less than a comparable flash drive.But Pure Storage thinks the second generation of its FlashArray//C storage platform will be a hybrid flash/disk storage killer because it has the capacity to match a hybrid array with an all-flash storage setup. The pitch is that with FlashArray//C’s capacity, enterprises can do away with hard-drive-based storage, which draws much more power than an SSD and generate far more heat.To read this article in full, please click here

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