Patrick Nelson

Author Archives: Patrick Nelson

Could human organs join networks?

The idea of integrating computer networks and the human body is driving research in a number of areas. Recently, two teams of researchers shared their respective projects, which explore how biological cells might become networked and how electronics could become directly integrated with human tissue.Both presentations were part of the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo.The first presentation, conducted by a team at the University of Maryland, is focused on communications networks that mimic electronic networks but are derived from biological cells. The second study, led out of University of Delaware, discusses the idea of interfacing hardware and human tissue.To read this article in full, please click here

Vendors lengthen the range of 5G millimeter-wave transmissions

Two wireless vendors say they have collaborated to significantly extend the useful range of millimeter-wave 5G transmissions beyond what had been widely considered its limits. 5G resources What is 5G? Fast wireless technology for enterprises and phones How 5G frequency affects range and speed Private 5G can solve some problems that Wi-Fi can’t Private 5G keeps Whirlpool driverless vehicles rolling 5G can make for cost-effective private backhaul CBRS can bring private 5G to enterprises Qualcomm and Ericsson have worked together in separate trials with two other companies to boost that distance from less than a mile (1.6km) to 3.8km in one case and to 5km-plus in the other, the companies claim.To read this article in full, please click here

Vendors extend the range of 5G millimeter-wave transmissions

Two wireless vendors say they have collaborated to significantly extend the useful range of millimeter-wave 5G transmissions beyond what had been widely considered its limits. 5G resources What is 5G? Fast wireless technology for enterprises and phones How 5G frequency affects range and speed Private 5G can solve some problems that Wi-Fi can’t Private 5G keeps Whirlpool driverless vehicles rolling 5G can make for cost-effective private backhaul CBRS can bring private 5G to enterprises Qualcomm and Ericsson have worked together in separate trials with two other companies to boost that distance from less than a mile (1.6km) to 3.8km in one case and to 5km-plus in the other, the companies claim.To read this article in full, please click here

Telehealth usage soars during COVID-19

Internet-based virtual healthcare, sometimes called telehealth or telemedicine, has seen a massive increase in usage during the pandemic, according to new research.A study by University of Michigan's National Poll on Healthy Aging (NPHA) found that a quarter of older adults aged between 50 and 80 had a virtual medical visit over a network in the first three months of the coronavirus pandemic. By comparison, in a similar poll from 2019, just 4% of people over 50 said they had ever had a virtual visit with a doctor. READ MORE: Pandemic reveals the need for better telemedicineTo read this article in full, please click here

Researchers set a new world-record Internet speed

Researchers at University College London claim they’ve obtained a new top internet speed of 178Tbps – a fifth quicker than the prior record and fast enough to download the entire Netflix catalog in under a second, they say.To achieve that, the researchers used different bandwidth ranges than are typically used in commercial optical systems. Traditional fiber infrastructure uses bandwidth of 4.5THz with 9THz becoming more available commercially. In UCL experiments, the scientists used 16.8THz.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] To do this the researchers used a variety of amplifier technologies, customizing which ones they used for each wavelength to optimize its performance as measured by phase, brightness and polarization, according to a press statement put out by UCL. These customization packages are known as geometric signal constellations.To read this article in full, please click here

Researchers set a new world-record Internet speed

Researchers at University College London claim they’ve obtained a new top internet speed of 178Tbps – a fifth quicker than the prior record and fast enough to download the entire Netflix catalog in under a second, they say.To achieve that, the researchers used different bandwidth ranges than are typically used in commercial optical systems. Traditional fiber infrastructure uses bandwidth of 4.5THz with 9THz becoming more available commercially. In UCL experiments, the scientists used 16.8THz.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] To do this the researchers used a variety of amplifier technologies, customizing which ones they used for each wavelength to optimize its performance as measured by phase, brightness and polarization, according to a press statement put out by UCL. These customization packages are known as geometric signal constellations.To read this article in full, please click here

Military looks to ultraviolet networks for secure battlefield communication

U.S. Army researchers are exploring the use of ultraviolet optical communications in battlefield situations because, under the right circumstances, the technology might support links that are undetectable to the enemy.One thing the researchers looked at was the effects of attenuation, the natural phenomenon of the signals getting weaker over distance. They wanted to know whether there was a distance range in which the signals were weak enough that adversaries likely couldn’t detect them, but still be strong enough that friendly receivers could. They say they observed that to be the case, but the research paper about their work doesn’t say what those distances are.To read this article in full, please click here

Information could be half the world’s mass by 2245, says researcher

Digital content should be considered a fifth state of matter, along with gas, liquid, plasma and solid, suggests one university scholar.Because of the energy and resources used to create, store and distribute data physically and digitally, data has evolved and should now be considered as mass, according to Melvin Vopson, a senior lecturer at the U.K.'s University of Portsmouth and author of an article, "The information catastrophe," published in the journal AIP Advances.Vopson also claims digital bits are on a course to overwhelm the planet and will eventually outnumber atoms.To read this article in full, please click here

Information could be half the world’s mass by 2245, says researcher

Digital content should be considered a fifth state of matter, along with gas, liquid, plasma and solid, suggests one university scholar.Because of the energy and resources used to create, store and distribute data physically and digitally, data has evolved and should now be considered as mass, according to Melvin Vopson, a senior lecturer at the U.K.'s University of Portsmouth and author of an article, "The information catastrophe," published in the journal AIP Advances.Vopson also claims digital bits are on a course to overwhelm the planet and will eventually outnumber atoms.To read this article in full, please click here

AI system analyzes code similarities, makes progress toward automated coding

With the rapid advances in artificial intelligence (AI), are we getting to the point when computers will be smart enough to write their own code and be done with human coders? New research suggests we might be getting closer to that milestone.Researchers from MIT and Georgia Tech teamed with Intel to develop an AI engine, dubbed Machine Inferred Code Similarity (MISIM), that's designed to analyze software code and determine how it's similar to other code. What's most interesting is the potential for the system to learn what bits of code do, and then use that intelligence to change how software is written. Ultimately, a human could explain what it wants a software program to do, and then a machine programming (MP) system could come up with a coded app to accomplish it.To read this article in full, please click here

Federated learning improves how AI data is managed, thwarts data leakage

Privacy is one of the big holdups to a world of ubiquitous, seamless data-sharing for artificial intelligence-driven learning. In an ideal world, massive quantities of data, such as medical imaging scans, could be shared openly across the globe so that machine learning algorithms can gain experience from a broad range of data sets. The more data shared, the better the outcomes.That generally doesn't happen now, including in the medical world, where privacy is paramount. For the most part, medical image scans, such as brain MRIs, stay at the institution level for analysis. The result is then shared, but not the original patient scan data. READ MORE: Cisco challenge winners use AI, IoT to tackle global problemsTo read this article in full, please click here

Federated learning improves how AI data is managed, thwarts data leakage

Privacy is one of the big holdups to a world of ubiquitous, seamless data-sharing for artificial intelligence-driven learning. In an ideal world, massive quantities of data, such as medical imaging scans, could be shared openly across the globe so that machine learning algorithms can gain experience from a broad range of data sets. The more data shared, the better the outcomes.That generally doesn't happen now, including in the medical world, where privacy is paramount. For the most part, medical image scans, such as brain MRIs, stay at the institution level for analysis. The result is then shared, but not the original patient scan data. READ MORE: Cisco challenge winners use AI, IoT to tackle global problemsTo read this article in full, please click here

Organic data-transfer technology holds promise for IoT

Visible light communications (VLC) systems are an alternative to radio-based wireless networks and serve a dual purpose: They provide in-building lighting, and they use light waves for data transmission. VLC uses modulated light as a data carrier, while the visible spectrum provides light.Using VLC for data transmission has some advantages. It offers decent bandwidth; it offers security because walls, floors and roofs obstruct the data-carrying wavelengths, which reduces the risk of eavesdropping; and it's inexpensive since it's simply incorporated into light fixtures or, in emerging developments, worked into displays and other surfaces.To read this article in full, please click here

Organic data-transfer technology holds promise for IoT

Visible light communications (VLC) systems are an alternative to radio-based wireless networks and serve a dual purpose: They provide in-building lighting, and they use light waves for data transmission. VLC uses modulated light as a data carrier, while the visible spectrum provides light.Using VLC for data transmission has some advantages. It offers decent bandwidth; it offers security because walls, floors and roofs obstruct the data-carrying wavelengths, which reduces the risk of eavesdropping; and it's inexpensive since it's simply incorporated into light fixtures or, in emerging developments, worked into displays and other surfaces.To read this article in full, please click here

Ambient ‘T-rays’ could help power IoT devices

Most things with a measurable temperature – human beings going about their daily routines, inert objects – generate terahertz waves, radiation that is sandwiched between infrared and microwave on the electromagnetic spectrum.So far, these waves haven’t proved very useful, but now scientists at MIT are trying to harness them with devices that use them to generate electricity that could charge the batteries of cellphones, laptops, even medical implants.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] If successful, the charging devices would passively gather the waves and generate DC current at room temperature, something that hasn’t been accomplished before. Previous devices that can turn terahertz waves – T-rays – to electricity only work in ultracold environments, according to an MIT News article about the project.To read this article in full, please click here

A tiny experimental optical chip can support downloads of 1,000 movies in a split second

An optical chip the size of a fingernail has enabled Australian researchers to set new optical data rate records on the country’s National Broadband Network (NBN).The raw data rate of 44.2Tbps over conventional optical cable is about three times the data rate for the entire NBN network and about 100 times the speed of any single device currently used on the network, the researchers say.10 of the world's fastest supercomputers While the technology is meant for metro-area networks and data centers, those bit rates would support downloads of 1,000 movies in less than a second.To read this article in full, please click here

How IoT will rescue aviation

A biotech company that develops sensors to detect explosives and other chemicals on planes and in airports is teaming up with Airbus to create a sensor that could detect passengers who are positive for COVID-19.California-based Koniku and Airbus, which have been working since 2017 on contactless equipment that sniffs out chemicals, are trying to adapt that technology to sniff out pathogens, says Osh Agabi, founder and CEO of Koniku, in a blog post.To read this article in full, please click here

New 6 GHz Wi-Fi could add $153 billion to U.S. economy: report

Opening the 6 GHz band to Wi-Fi could add $153.75 billion to the U.S. economy over the next five years, according to a new study.In late April, the Federal Communications Commission adopted rules that make 1,200 megahertz of spectrum in the 6 GHz band available for unlicensed use. Freeing up the chunk of 6 GHz spectrum for Wi-Fi is the biggest frequency allocation upgrade to the now aging wireless protocol in 10 years. Wi-Fi using 5 GHz spectrum – the last major touch-up – was introduced in 2009. The original 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi was introduced in 1997.To read this article in full, please click here

How underwater Internet of Things will work

More than two-thirds of the world's surface is covered by water. It plays an important role in our economic existence, including in major verticals such as oil and gas, shipping and tourism.As the Internet of Things proliferates, questions arise as to how IoT will manifest itself underwater given that radio waves degrade over distance in seawater, and underwater acoustic communication (which does actually work okay) is easily eavesdropped on and isn't stealthy.To make the underwater Internet of Things happen, light is the answer, some say. Researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, are proposing underwater optical communications. They're investigating simultaneous lightwave information and power transfer (SLIPT) configurations, which they're using to transmit energy and data to underwater electronic devices. Recently, the researchers announced a breakthrough experiment in which they were able to achieve an underwater, two-way transmission of data and power over 1.5 yards between a solar panel-equipped sensor and a receiver.To read this article in full, please click here

Harvesting ambient energy will power IoT, scientists say

Stray, ambient magnetic fields that are naturally created from electricity usage should be captured, diverted, and converted into power for Internet of Things sensors, researchers say."Just like sunlight is a free source of energy we try to harvest, so are magnetic fields," said Shashank Priya, professor of materials science and engineering and associate vice president for research at Penn State, in a statement published on the university's web site. "We have this ubiquitous energy present in our homes, office spaces, work spaces and cars. It's everywhere, and we have an opportunity to harvest this background noise and convert it to useable electricity."To read this article in full, please click here

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