Sandra Henry-Stocker

Author Archives: Sandra Henry-Stocker

How to best set up command aliases on Linux

Used frequently, bash aliases can make working on the Linux command line a lot smoother and easier, but they can also be complicated and hard to remember. This post examines how you might make your aliases work for you rather than vice versa.In general, aliases are especially good for: simplifying commands that are long and overly complex remembering commands with odd or complicated names saving time using commands that you use very often What you need to keep in mind is that: aliases can themselves be hard to remember giving an alias the same name as a regular command can be a good thing or a bad thing (more on this shortly) How to create an alias Use the alias command and remember to add it to your ~/.bashrc file so that it will still be waiting for you whenever you login.To read this article in full, please click here

How to best set up command aliases on Linux

Used frequently, bash aliases can make working on the Linux command line a lot smoother and easier, but they can also be complicated and hard to remember. This post examines how you might make your aliases work for you rather than vice versa.In general, aliases are especially good for: simplifying commands that are long and overly complex remembering commands with odd or complicated names saving time using commands that you use very often What you need to keep in mind is that: aliases can themselves be hard to remember giving an alias the same name as a regular command can be a good thing or a bad thing (more on this shortly) How to create an alias Use the alias command and remember to add it to your ~/.bashrc file so that it will still be waiting for you whenever you login.To read this article in full, please click here

Red Hat announces Red Hat Edge initiative

During this week's Red Hat Summit, the company announced enhanced support for edge networking in its upcoming RHEL 8.4 release. The Red Hat Edge initiative promises new capabilities that will make RHEL a more powerful foundation for the open hybrid cloud.The Red Hat Edge aims to extend Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud portfolio to the edge. This will involve everything from telecommunications and transportation to smart automobiles and enterprise devices. With Red Hat technologies, the edge-ready technology stack uses Red Hat Enterprise Linux along with: Red Hat OpenShift – making it possible to deploy Kubernetes platform in both space- and resource-constrained locations Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management – adding Kubernetes management capabilities across the hybrid cloud Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform – automating workflows Red Hat Integration – connecting applications and data across edge and open cloud deployments Red Hat Data Services – storing, analyzing and distributing data across edge and data centers The company is also expanding its predictive analytics offering, Red Hat Insights, across the open hybrid cloud with the launch of Red Hat Insights for Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform and with expanded capabilities for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Continue reading

Red Hat announces Red Hat Edge initiative

During this week's Red Hat Summit, the company announced enhanced support for edge networking in its upcoming RHEL 8.4 release. The Red Hat Edge initiative promises new capabilities that will make RHEL a more powerful foundation for the open hybrid cloud.The Red Hat Edge aims to extend Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud portfolio to the edge. This will involve everything from telecommunications and transportation to smart automobiles and enterprise devices. With Red Hat technologies, the edge-ready technology stack uses Red Hat Enterprise Linux along with: Red Hat OpenShift – making it possible to deploy Kubernetes platform in both space- and resource-constrained locations Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management – adding Kubernetes management capabilities across the hybrid cloud Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform – automating workflows Red Hat Integration – connecting applications and data across edge and open cloud deployments Red Hat Data Services – storing, analyzing and distributing data across edge and data centers The company is also expanding its predictive analytics offering, Red Hat Insights, across the open hybrid cloud with the launch of Red Hat Insights for Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform and with expanded capabilities for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Continue reading

Manipulating the Ubuntu dock to keep favorite apps handy

If you're a Linux user, you are undoubtedly familiar with the "dock"--that column of icons lined up on the side of your screen that includes important applications, your favorites. It allows you to open the applications simply by left clicking on one of the icons. Sandra Henry-Stocker / IDG But did you know that you can add or remove applications from your dock and sometimes even change the location of the dock on your screen? This post shows you how to make these changes on Ubuntu.To read this article in full, please click here

Manipulating the Ubuntu dock to keep favorite apps handy

If you're a Linux user, you are undoubtedly familiar with the "dock"--that column of icons lined up on the side of your screen that includes important applications, your favorites. It allows you to open the applications simply by left clicking on one of the icons. Sandra Henry-Stocker / IDG But did you know that you can add or remove applications from your dock and sometimes even change the location of the dock on your screen? This post shows you how to make these changes on Ubuntu.To read this article in full, please click here

Linux commands for testing connectivity and transfer rates

There are quite a few tools that can help test your connectivity on the Linux command line. In this post, we'll look at a series of commands that can help estimate your connection speed, test whether you can reach other systems, analyze connection delays, and determine whether particular services are available.ping The ping command is the simplest and most often used command for doing basic connectivity testing. It sends out packets called echo requests and are packets that request a response. The command looks for the responses and displays them along with how long each response took and then reports what percentage of the requests were answered.To read this article in full, please click here

Linux commands for testing connectivity and transfer rates

There are quite a few tools that can help test your connectivity on the Linux command line. In this post, we'll look at a series of commands that can help estimate your connection speed, test whether you can reach other systems, analyze connection delays, and determine whether particular services are available.ping The ping command is the simplest and most often used command for doing basic connectivity testing. It sends out packets called echo requests and are packets that request a response. The command looks for the responses and displays them along with how long each response took and then reports what percentage of the requests were answered.To read this article in full, please click here

Taking control of your Ubuntu desktop

You may have a lot more control over your Ubuntu desktop than you know. In this post, we'll look into what you should expect to see by default and how you can change that.Most Linux desktops start out charmingly uncluttered. They display a handful of icons on an attractive background. These include shortcuts for launching applications, generally along the left side or bottom of the screen, and maybe another icon or two in the otherwise open area.The uncluttered desktop is generally a good thing. You can open folders using your file manager and move around to any group of files that you need to use or update. By changing a setting on Ubuntu (and related distributions), however, you can also set up your system to open with a specified set of files in view – and you don't have to move them into your Desktop folder to do so.To read this article in full, please click here

10 of the best ways to get help on Linux

Just because Linux appeals to the nerdiest of nerds doesn't mean that it can't be extremely helpful for those who don't want to spend a lot of time delving into the technical details of how to use various commands. In fact, Linux provides a series of tools that can help anyone master the command line or just get the task at hand done more quickly and efficiently. This post covers 10 of the best options.man pages You can always go to the man pages to answer usage and syntax questions you might have on a Linux command. Just type "man" followed by the name of the command (e.g., man ps), and you'll get a lot of descriptive information. On the other hand, if you really just want to see some examples of how to use a particular command, the content of a man page might be a lot more than you want to comb through. In the remainder of this post, I'll explain some other options for finding the command that you need and learning how to use it.To read this article in full, please click here

10 of the best ways to get help on Linux

Just because Linux appeals to the nerdiest of nerds doesn't mean that it can't be extremely helpful for those who don't want to spend a lot of time delving into the technical details of how to use various commands. In fact, Linux provides a series of tools that can help anyone master the command line or just get the task at hand done more quickly and efficiently. This post covers 10 of the best options.man pages You can always go to the man pages to answer usage and syntax questions you might have on a Linux command. Just type "man" followed by the name of the command (e.g., man ps), and you'll get a lot of descriptive information. On the other hand, if you really just want to see some examples of how to use a particular command, the content of a man page might be a lot more than you want to comb through. In the remainder of this post, I'll explain some other options for finding the command that you need and learning how to use it.To read this article in full, please click here

Linux tricks to speed up your workday

One of the really nice things about working on the Linux command line is that you can get a lot of work done very quickly. With a handle on the most useful commands and some command-line savvy, you can take a lot of the tedium out of your daily work. This post will walk you through several handy tricks that can make your work load feel a little lighter and maybe be a little bit more enjoyable.Emptying files with > Any time you have an important file that you need to empty because it's become too large or the data is no longer needed, you can do that by using the command > filename. This is much faster than removing the file and recreating it with the original permissions. The > sign followed by the file name works the same as typing cat /dev/null > filename, but is wonderfully quick. It empties the file, but leaves permissions and ownership intact.To read this article in full, please click here

Linux tricks to speed up your workday

One of the really nice things about working on the Linux command line is that you can get a lot of work done very quickly. With a handle on the most useful commands and some command-line savvy, you can take a lot of the tedium out of your daily work. This post will walk you through several handy tricks that can make your work load feel a little lighter and maybe be a little bit more enjoyable.Emptying files with > Any time you have an important file that you need to empty because it's become too large or the data is no longer needed, you can do that by using the command > filename. This is much faster than removing the file and recreating it with the original permissions. The > sign followed by the file name works the same as typing cat /dev/null > filename, but is wonderfully quick. It empties the file, but leaves permissions and ownership intact.To read this article in full, please click here

What’s on your network?

If you’d like to know what systems and devices are attached to your local network—whether out of security concerns or simple curiosity, Linux has some really great commands for providing answers. In this post, we’ll probe a small network and see how devices can be identified.nmap The first tool we’ll use is nmap, which stands for Network Mapper, an open source tool for exploring networks and doing some serious security auditing. It was designed to work quickly even on large networks and provide information using raw packets to identify hosts, services, and sometimes even operating systems.The simple scan shown below is detecting systems and devices on the local network. The “/24” portion of the target address indicates that all hosts in the 192.168.0.x IP address range are to be included.To read this article in full, please click here

What’s on your network?

If you’d like to know what systems and devices are attached to your local network—whether out of security concerns or simple curiosity, Linux has some really great commands for providing answers. In this post, we’ll probe a small network and see how devices can be identified.nmap The first tool we’ll use is nmap, which stands for Network Mapper, an open source tool for exploring networks and doing some serious security auditing. It was designed to work quickly even on large networks and provide information using raw packets to identify hosts, services, and sometimes even operating systems.The simple scan shown below is detecting systems and devices on the local network. The “/24” portion of the target address indicates that all hosts in the 192.168.0.x IP address range are to be included.To read this article in full, please click here

What’s on your Linux network?

If you’d like to know what systems and devices are attached to your local network—whether out of security concerns or simple curiosity, Linux has some really great commands for providing answers. In this post, we’ll probe a small network and see how devices can be identified.nmap The first tool we’ll use is nmap, which stands for Network Mapper, an open source tool for exploring networks and doing some serious security auditing. It was designed to work quickly even on large networks and provide information using raw packets to identify hosts, services, and sometimes even operating systems.The simple scan shown below is detecting systems and devices on the local network. The “/24” portion of the target address indicates that all hosts in the 192.168.0.x IP address range are to be included.To read this article in full, please click here

What’s on your Linux network?

If you’d like to know what systems and devices are attached to your local network—whether out of security concerns or simple curiosity, Linux has some really great commands for providing answers. In this post, we’ll probe a small network and see how devices can be identified.nmap The first tool we’ll use is nmap, which stands for Network Mapper, an open source tool for exploring networks and doing some serious security auditing. It was designed to work quickly even on large networks and provide information using raw packets to identify hosts, services, and sometimes even operating systems.The simple scan shown below is detecting systems and devices on the local network. The “/24” portion of the target address indicates that all hosts in the 192.168.0.x IP address range are to be included.To read this article in full, please click here

File systems and UUIDs on Linux

The /etc/fstab file is a very important file on Linux systems. It contains information that allows the system to connect to disk partitions and determine where they should be mounted in the file system. While this file has played an important role over the years, its format has changed with the introduction of UUIDs and, on some systems, a more reliable file-system type.Here's an example of an /etc/fstab file on a Fedora system:$ cat /etc/fstab # # /etc/fstab # Created by anaconda on Fri Mar 12 12:26:55 2021 # # Accessible filesystems, by reference, are maintained under '/dev/disk/'. # See man pages fstab(5), findfs(8), mount(8) and/or blkid(8) for more info. # # After editing this file, run 'systemctl daemon-reload' to update systemd # units generated from this file. # UUID=a9e33237-9114-44ae-afd5-8ddb231d301f / btrfs subvol=root 0 0 UUID=15f42905-5897-4804-9c51-e6d5e169e6c2 /boot ext4 defaults 1 2 #UUID=a9e33237-9114-44ae-afd5-8ddb231d301f /home btrfs subvol=home 0 0 UUID=d867ced1-8d81-47c6-b299-3365ba8a02de /home ext4 defaults How to loop forever in bash on Linux Each line in the file (other than the comments) represents a file system and has six fields.To read this article in full, please click here

File systems and UUIDs on Linux

The /etc/fstab file is a very important file on Linux systems. It contains information that allows the system to connect to disk partitions and determine where they should be mounted in the file system. While this file has played an important role over the years, its format has changed with the introduction of UUIDs and, on some systems, a more reliable file-system type.Here's an example of an /etc/fstab file on a Fedora system:$ cat /etc/fstab # # /etc/fstab # Created by anaconda on Fri Mar 12 12:26:55 2021 # # Accessible filesystems, by reference, are maintained under '/dev/disk/'. # See man pages fstab(5), findfs(8), mount(8) and/or blkid(8) for more info. # # After editing this file, run 'systemctl daemon-reload' to update systemd # units generated from this file. # UUID=a9e33237-9114-44ae-afd5-8ddb231d301f / btrfs subvol=root 0 0 UUID=15f42905-5897-4804-9c51-e6d5e169e6c2 /boot ext4 defaults 1 2 #UUID=a9e33237-9114-44ae-afd5-8ddb231d301f /home btrfs subvol=home 0 0 UUID=d867ced1-8d81-47c6-b299-3365ba8a02de /home ext4 defaults How to loop forever in bash on Linux Each line in the file (other than the comments) represents a file system and has six fields.To read this article in full, please click here

Basic scripting on Unix and Linux

Creating a script on a Unix or Linux system can be dead easy or surprisingly complex; it all depends on how much you’re trying to get the script to do. In this post, we look at scripting basics—at how to get started if you have never built a script before.Identifying the shell Unix and Linux systems today have a number of shells that you can use. Each shell is a command interpreter. It reads commands and sends them to the kernel for processing.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Bash is one of the most popular, but there’s also zsh, csh, tcsh and korn. There’s even one called fish that can be especially nice for Linux beginners because of its helpful command auto-completion options. To determine which shell you are using, use this command:To read this article in full, please click here

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