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New products of the week 04.20.2015

New products of the weekOur roundup of intriguing new products. Read how to submit an entry to Network World's products of the week slideshow.Acronis Backup ServicePricing: By cloud storage:·         5,000 GB -> $8,500·         1,000 GB -> $2,400·         500GB -> $1,300·         250GB -> $750Key features: Acronis Backup Service solves your business data protection challenges with a complete and easy-to-manage service that backs up any data from any source and recovers to any destination or system. More info.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

US intelligence outfit wants the ultimate quantum qubit

Researchers behind the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) want to gather computer scientists engineers and physicists to define the challenge of “encoding imperfect physical qubits into a logical qubit that protects against gate errors and damaging environmental influences.”A quantum bit or qubit or quantum bit in the quantum computing realm usesqubitsinstead of the usual bits representing 1s or 0s. Ultimately quantum computing efforts should result in super-fast, super secure computers the experts say. [For a good article on why quantum computing can be so damn confusing and why its development is critical, go here.]To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

AMD pulls back: Less ARM in the cloud, more NOC power consumption

I have a certain sadness as I write this. Data center computational densities have incurred a setback.There was a time when it looked as though ARM might give power-hungry Intel designs a run for their money in the world of high-density computing. It's the sort of density that cloud providers need: rack after rack, crammed to the gills, chilled, high-speed buses. But power costs a lot of money, alternate energy initiatives aside.AMD had bought SeaMicro, whose high-density chassis full of power-sipping ARM CPUs form large arrays of calculative strength, without the hefty bill from the power company for oceans of coulombs. HP had initially announced Project Moonshot, the cartridge-based high-density server with ARM, or FPGA cartridges to slowly sip power, but ultimately delivered its chassis with Intel Atom. ARM blades are still available, and FPGAs are said to be shipping.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Facebook tries to keep it real by killing more ‘fake’ likes

Facebook has tripled its detection and elimination of “fake” likes, which can artificially inflate a brand’s prominence on the site and deceive users, the company said on Friday.Facebook began improving its processes for eliminating fake likes this past October. They’re a real problem for the site, because they can trick a page owner or business into thinking they’re more popular on Facebook than they really are, fooling regular users along the way.Fraudulent likes originate from click farms, fake accounts and malware, and are sold to page owners who want to boost their exposure on Facebook. But in reality they don’t do much to win them actual customers, fans or increased sales.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Google seeks $19.8M tax break in Iowa

Google needs a tax break like Bill Gates needs food stamps, yet that isn’t stopping the search giant from asking for $19.8 million in “economic development incentives” from Iowa to build a $1-billion expansion of its growing data center facility in Council Bluffs.And, well, why not ask? The company has already been given $16.8 million in tax breaks to build out the various stages of the existing Council Bluffs facility, which opened in 2007.According to this Omaha World-Herald report, the latest tax break is expected to be approved by the Iowa Economic Development Authority and the Council Bluffs City Council with little or no opposition.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

LA school district seeks millions from Apple over iPad software woes

The Los Angeles Unified School District is seeking a multimillion dollar refund from Apple over a failed project to provide 650,000 students with iPads they could use at home.LA Unified approached Apple in 2013 about using its tablets as part of an ambitious project to provide every student, teacher and administrator in the U.S.'s second-largest school district with an iPad.The initiative, then known as the Common Core Technology Project, would cost around US$1.3 billion, the school district said at the time, with half that figure going to Apple and the remainder being used to build out wireless networks at the schools.Apple hired Pearson Education as a subcontractor to develop software for the iPads, but according to a letter the school district sent to Apple this week, a "vast majority" of the student have been unable to use the software.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

AMD withdraws from high-density server business

AMD has pulled out of the market for high-density servers, reversing a strategy it embarked on three years ago with its acquisition of SeaMicro.AMD delivered the news Thursday as it announced financial results for the quarter. Its revenue slumped 26 percent from this time last year to $1.03 billion, and its net loss increased to $180 million, the company said.AMD paid $334 million to buy SeaMicro, which had developed a new type of high-density server aimed at large-scale cloud and Internet service providers.The purchase was made under former CEO Rory Read, and has now been reversed by Lisa Su, who took over the CEO job last October.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

AMD withdraws from high-density server business

AMD has pulled out of the market for high-density servers, reversing a strategy it embarked on three years ago with its acquisition of SeaMicro.AMD delivered the news Thursday as it announced financial results for the quarter. Its revenue slumped 26 percent from this time last year to $1.03 billion, and its net loss increased to $180 million, the company said.AMD paid $334 million to buy SeaMicro, which developed a new type of high-density server aimed at large-scale cloud and Internet service providers. The purchase was made under former CEO Rory Read, and has now been reversed by Lisa Su, who took over the CEO job last October.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Moore’s Law at 50: The past and future

When you’re strapping on the latest smart watch or ogling an iPhone, you probably aren’t thinking of Moore’s Law, which for 50 years has been used as a blueprint to make computers smaller, cheaper and faster.Without Moore’s Law it’s quite possible that new types of computers like Microsoft’s HoloLens, a holographic wearable with which users can interact with floating images, would not have been developed. For decades, Moore’s Law has been a guiding star for the development of modern electronics, though in recent years its relevance has been subject to debate.Moore’s Law isn’t a scientific theory, but a set of observations and predictions made by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in an article [click here to download] first published in Electronics Magazine on April 19, 1965, which were subsequently modified. His core prediction states that the density of transistors, or the number of transistors on a given die area, would double every two years, which leads to double the performance. Loosely translated, that means in 18 to 24 months you could buy a computer that is significantly faster than what you have today with the same amount of money.To read this article in full or to Continue reading

Size matters in mobile, but Nokia may find bigger isn’t better

Size is power in the mobile networks business, but it’s only one of the reasons Nokia is acquiring Alcatel-Lucent.Nokia estimates the company that will emerge from the planned buyout will be the second-largest vendor of carrier infrastructure by revenue, a bit smaller than Ericsson and slightly larger than Huawei Technologies. In a price-competitive industry where technology is constantly evolving, that matters, analysts say. But size alone isn’t reason enough to justify the €15.6 billion (US$16.5 billion) deal.As consumers watch more videos and use more apps on mobile devices, vendors are developing new technologies on multiple fronts to make sure networks can keep up with the demand. Putting up more conventional cells doesn’t cut it anymore, so they’re turning to exotic approaches like millimeter-wave beams and LTE networks that can use the same frequencies as Wi-Fi. Vendors are already jockeying for influence over 5G, the next generation of wireless specifications expected by 2020.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Forever 21 denies pirating Adobe software, strikes back

Retail chain Forever 21 has denied making illegal copies of Adobe’s software, as the Photoshop maker alleged in a lawsuit, and shot back that Adobe tries to bully customers who are accused of piracy into paying exorbitant license fees.Adobe sued Forever 21 in January, in a copyright lawsuit filed along with software makers Corel and Autodesk. All three companies claim that Forever 21 “wilfully, maliciously and intentionally” used their software without proper licenses.The retailer skirted copy protection technologies to illegally install software on its computers, they said. And it continued the behavior after it was alerted by Adobe to its infringement, according to the lawsuit, filed in federal district court in Northern California. The companies want a jury trial to determine financial damages.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tata gives employees anniversary bonus, cuts into profits

India’s outsourcing industry needs to hire and retain staff in big numbers to keep business humming, so for the 10th anniversary of its initial public offering, Tata Consultancy Services announced a one-time “special reward” for its employees.As a result, Tata took a dip in profits in the first quarter to give out a large bonus.TCS said all its employees worldwide, who have completed at least one year of service, would be eligible for the special bonus, with each employee paid one week’s salary for every year of service in the company.At the end of the quarter TCS had 319,656 employees. The bonus will cost the company about US$423 million.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Go-to storage and disaster recovery products

LEAF Commercial Capital used to wrestle with tape backups for disaster recovery. Now the equipment leasing and finance company is using a software-based service from Evolve IP for disaster recovery.Rusty Lorenzon, director of IT Infrastructure at Philadelphia-based LEAF, says Evolve IP’s disaster-recovery-as-a-service (DRaaS) has allowed the company to reduce its recovery-time objectives from 48 hours or more to four hours or less. At the same time, LEAF has reduced its disaster recovery operational expenses.“We adopted Evolve IP as an update to our traditional disaster recovery strategy, which had our team using tape backups and interfacing with various DR suppliers,” Lorenzon says. “Evolve IP DRaaS ZT is a flexible solution with an intuitive interface that is easy to configure and use. It’s built for the VMWare hypervisor and is completely SAN agnostic, which allows us to avoid SAN vendor lock-in.”To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tech pros’ favorite tools increase IT efficiency

Content is core to the work of Densho, an organization whose mission is to preserve the testimonies of Japanese Americans who were held in internment camps during World War II.In the past, Densho needed a complex storage environment to house its 30TB of production data, says Geoff Froh, deputy director and CIO at the nonprofit organization based in Seattle.“The two-tier infrastructure was composed of high-performance SAN hardware and high-capacity consumer-grade NAS appliances. The SAN was expensive, difficult to manage and not scalable. The NAS gear was unreliable and lacked the IOPS to handle our workload,” Froh recalls.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Fave Raves: 34 tech pros share favorite IT products

Fave Raves 2015We asked, and IT pros answered. Their favorite tech products keep people productive and enterprise assets running safely and efficiently. Check out the must-haves.SEE ALSO: Security pros name their must-have tools | Go-to storage and disaster recovery products | IT pros in retail are sold on these 6 products | Tech pros' favorite tools increase IT efficiency | To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

The Upload: Your tech news briefing for Thursday, April 16

In antitrust case, EC could have a tough time proving Google abuseA European Commission victory in its antitrust case against Google is not a sure bet. The narrowly defined case, focusing on search results that allegedly favor Google Shopping, indicates that the Commission thought that broad charges would not stick, legal experts say. And to successfully conclude the case, the Commission must show that Google’s actions harm not just competitors, but consumers as well, which could be a stretch.Israeli camera tech may be lens on future Apple productsTo read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Nokia/Alcatel-Lucent just as John Chambers predicted

ALLEN, TX -- Nokia’s $16.6 billion acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent is an example of the industry shifting just as Cisco predicted, its CEO said this week.Cisco CEO John Chambers has said that the IT industry in in for some “brutal” consolidation with perhaps only two or three of the top five companies standing in five years. Alcatel-Lucent may be vanishing if Nokia’s offer to swallow the company up is approved.“The market is playing out just as we expected,” Chambers said during an exclusive interview with Network World at Cisco IT Data Center Day here. “It’s going to be brutal, with some musical chairs. They missed market transitions so now they have to move rapidly.”To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Transition to IP network creates cybersecurity challenges for FAA

The Internet hasn’t totally invaded the nation’s air traffic control system, but as it does the Federal Aviation Administration faces a growing challenge to make sure the network is locked down secure.The security issues arise as the agency moves from a point-to-point legacy air traffic control structure to a new IP-based system commonly known as NextGen or Next Generation Air Transportation System. NextGen in a nutshell will move the current radar-based air traffic system to one that is based on satellite navigation and automation.+More on Network World: The most magnificent high-tech flying machines+To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Pure Storage CEO promises huge savings with flash

The term 'disruption' gets tossed about a lot -- too often -- in the technology industry. But it isn't always hype. Backed by nearly half a billion dollars in investment, CEO Scott Dietzen and Pure Storage are hard at work disrupting a big chunk of the enterprise storage market owned by the likes NetApp and EMC, which is no stranger to disruption itself, having turned the tables on a previous generation of storage leaders.I had the opportunity to talk to [EMC CEO] Joe Tucci a couple of months back and I asked him about flash. I'm paraphrasing him here, but he describes a world where there's a role for tape, disk, flash. Do customers still buy that?To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here(Insider Story)

Yahoo reportedly close to purchasing Foursquare

In an effort to boost its mobile offerings, Yahoo is reportedly finishing up a deal to buy Foursquare.Foursquare’s search app can be used to as a local city guide to find shops, restaurants and other points of interest. The startup also created the social networking app Swarm, which allows people to check-in at locations and see if friends are nearby.The deal, which would be worth around US$900 million, has been agreed to and the companies are now working through details, according to sources cited by TechCrunch. However, other sources said they had no knowledge of the deal.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here