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Category Archives for "Network World Data Center"

MtGox creditors can finally file claims for lost bitcoins

Former customers of MtGox, once the world’s largest trading place for bitcoin, can finally file claims for lost assets.The filings are starting over a year after the exchange collapsed with bitcoin worth hundreds of millions of dollars missing. Claims will be accepted until May 29, bankruptcy trustee Nobuaki Kobayashi announced Wednesday at a MtGox creditors’ meeting.The claims will be submitted online at claims.mtgox.com and users have the option of sending them via Kraken, the bitcoin exchange operated by Payward, which has been helping Kobayashi in investigating the lost coins and setting up the claims system.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

HP leaves Apple Beats behind with new X360 hybrids

Hewlett-Packard has closed the door on its partnership with Beats Audio, now owned by Apple, by introducing its first hybrid PCs to feature Bang and Olufsen audio technology.The Envy X360 and Pavilion X360 are intended to be primarily laptops, but can be used as tablets with screens that rotate 360 degrees. The hybrids can also deliver booming sound.HP has relied on Beats for years for its PCs and tablets, but that was before Apple acquired it. HP’s new X360 hybrids are the first of many PCs, tablets and accessories that will carry audio from B&O, said Mike Nash, a vice president with HP’s Personal Systems Group.The hybrids don’t have striking designs or the thinness of Lenovo’s Yoga PC, but they are less expensive and come with the latest Intel Pentium Core M and Core i processors. Another selling point is their ability to fit up to 1TB of hard-drive storage, which is a rarity in hybrids.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

HP partners with FireEye for cyberattack investigation and response

Hewlett-Packard is partnering with computer security company FireEye to give it a technological edge in detecting and investigating cyberattacks.FireEye’s threat detection and incident response capabilities will be incorporated into HP’s Enterprise Services. The companies are planning to offer an “industry standard reference architecture” centered around advanced threat protection and incident response, according to a news release Tuesday from the RSA security conference in San Francisco.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Google, Apple, Amazon spend record amounts on lobbying

Google, Apple and Amazon.com spent record amounts in the first quarter attempting to influence U.S. politicians and policy.Google, which was already the biggest tech lobbyist in Washington, D.C., spent $5.47 million in the first three months of the year, according to a report filed with the Senate Office of Public Records.That made it the fifth biggest federal lobbyist across all industries during the quarter, according to an analysis by Maplight.Google has been steadily increasing the amount it spends to influence the course of policy and law on a range of issues. Since mid-2011, it has spent on average at least a million dollars each month in areas both central to its business, such as online advertising and security, and tangential to it, such as international tax reform and drone technology.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Yahoo, still reliant on PCs, posts earnings that disappoint

Mobile is a crucial element in CEO Marissa Mayer’s turnaround plan for Yahoo, but the company is still heavily dependant on PCs for its money.That was evident Tuesday when Yahoo reported its financial results for the last quarter. Revenue from ads displayed on PCs brought in $873 million—more than three-quarters of the total. Mobile revenue climbed 61 percent from last year, but still reached only $234 million.This could be one reason Yahoo continues to struggle. Overall sales at the company rose by 8 percent to $1.23 billion. But excluding payments made to partners, sales were down 4 percent to $1.04 billion, missing the analyst estimate of $1.06 billion, according to a poll by Thomson Reuters.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

In case you aren’t suitably impressed by the scale of Amazon Web Services

Although the video has been up for awhile, if you haven’t had the chance to watch Amazon Web Service’s VP & Distinguished Engineer James Hamilton spell out AWS facts at the re:Invent conference last November, do yourself a favor and pull up a chair. Fascinating stuff that gives you some insight into the rapidly evolving world of cloud computing.The video is embedded below (or you can watch it on YouTube here, but here are some facts to whet your appetite: AWS has more than 1 million users AWS Simple Storage Service (S3) usage is growing 132% year over year AWS Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) is growing 99% year over year Every day AWS adds as much new server capacity as Amazon used to support its $7 billion business back in 2004 Networking only represents 8% of monthly AWS operating costs, Hamilton says, but the “cost of networking is escalating relative to the cost of all the other equipment.” That is very “anti-Moore,” he says.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Raytheon forms defense-grade security unit with $1.9 billion Websense buy

Ever since its acquisition of Q1 Labs back in 2011, IBM has been selling its QRadar security event management software in the traditional way, whereby customers pay a price and download the version they want.On Tuesday, however, the company launched two new services that make the technology available through a cloud-based Software as a Service (SaaS) model instead.IBM Security Intelligence on Cloud, for instance, is designed to help organizations determine whether security-related events are simple anomalies or potential threats. Built as a cloud service using IBM QRadar, the tool lets enterprises correlate security-event data with threat information from more than 500 supported data sources for devices, systems and applications. More than 1,500 predefined reports are also available for a variety of use cases.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Raytheon forms defense-grade security unit with $1.9 billion Websense buy

Defense contractor Raytheon is purchasing Websense, which it plans to combine  with its own security unit to create a new, separately operated business to  battle criminal networks and state-funded espionage.Today's Internet attacks "are becoming increasingly more sophisticated and are  being perpetuated by state sponsored groups, criminal organizations,  hacktivists and insiders," said David Wajsgras, president of Raytheon  intelligence, information and services business, in a conference call Monday  announcing the acquisition. "Our goal is to provide defense-grade solutions  that allow our customers defend against [attacks], detect them early, decide  how to counter and defeat such attacks in real-time."To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Alcatel-Lucent grows switching and virtual networking portfolio

Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise this week rolled out a new switch and software enhancements designed to simplify network operations through automation and design flexibility.Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise became independent from Alcatel-Lucent last fall. Alcatel-Lucent is being acquired by Nokia for over $16 billion, but Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise is not part of the deal.+MORE ON NETWORK WORLD: Eyes turn to Ericsson, Juniper+To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Coming soon: The app store for virtualization

The constant push to increase productivity and profit has historically led commercial enterprises to drive some of our world's most significant technology advances. It was the enterprise push for further development of desktop computer processing that changed the personal computer from a hobbyist activity to a mission-critical tool. Commercial organizations deployed fiber for dedicated computer networks while the rest of us were just getting used to DSL. And the cellphone? It began its life as tool to keep business sales teams and execs more productive.But something happened during the smartphone revolution. What made the smartphone the critical invention of the 21st century was the ease of application use. Applications became "apps," and with them came their own marketplace, or "app store."To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

The Upload: Your tech news briefing for Tuesday, April 21

New mainframe can’t keep IBM sales from slidingIBM reported a 12 percent drop in revenue for the last quarter despite a big boost from its new z13 mainframe. Profit was down 5 percent to $2.4 billion on revenue of $19.6 billion. IBM said Monday that its cloud, analytics and mobile business increased more than 20 percent from a year earlier, but wasn’t enough to offset declines elsewhere.Google’s Mobilegeddon hits TuesdayIt’s here: the day that webmasters have called Mobilegeddon for its potentially cataclysmic effect on those who did not heed the warnings has arrived. On Tuesday, websites that aren’t sufficiently mobile-friendly will find themselves tumbling far down in Google’s search rankings.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tech’s ticking time bombs: The components you might (and might not) expect to wear out

Frequent failureImage by ENIAC used over 17,000 vacuum tubes. TexasDex/Wikipedia.The early computers of the vacuum-tube age were marvels of engineering for their time. Today, we can simultaneously appreciate the advances these computers represented, making previously unthinkable computational work possible, and chuckle at what to us seems like their ludicrous size and painfully slow processing speeds.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Qualcomm looking to fast-track Snapdragon 820 with help from Samsung

A plan by Qualcomm to get Samsung Electronics to make its Snapdragon 820 chip could lead to faster smartphones, offering longer battery life by early next year.The chip company will get its top-line device manufactured in factories belonging to Samsung, according to a news report by Re/code. The South Korean company will make the Snapdragon 820 chip using the 14-nanometer process, which will also be used to make Apple’s next A9 chip.The Snapdragon 820 chip was announced last month at Mobile World Congress and is expected to start shipping later this year. Qualcomm hasn’t shared information about where it will be manufactured, but Samsung’s 14-nm process will provide big performance and power advantages over current Snapdragon chips.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Great customer experience is an elusive goal

Every company says it wants to provide a top-notch customer experience; how many actually do is another matter.To wit: Although improving the customer experience is a strategic priority at a full 73 percent of businesses surveyed for a new Forrester Research report released Monday, only 1 percent of companies currently deliver an excellent experience, the study found.That’s a problem, Forrester says, because customer experience (sometimes called CX) has become a more strategic imperative than ever.“Growth is now the top priority for business leaders, and to achieve that you have to improve customer experience,” said Kyle McNabb, a vice president of research strategy with Forrester. “Traditionally we’ve all worked toward metrics like ROI, but now the metric is impact on experience.”To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IBM sales dip 12 percent despite lift from new mainframe

IBM reported a 12 percent drop in revenue for the last quarter despite a big boost from its new z13 mainframe, which went on sale last month.Revenue for the quarter ended March 31 was $19.6 billion, with profit down 5 percent to $2.4 billion, IBM announced Monday.Two-thirds of the company’s business comes from overseas, and the strong U.S. dollar weighed on its results. Without the currency impact, and adjusting for businesses that IBM recently sold off, revenue would have been flat from a year ago, CFO Martin Schroeter said on IBM’s earnings call.Like its rival Hewlett-Packard, IBM has been watching its business shrink for several quarters as customers spend less on expensive hardware and IT services and devote more to cloud computing and mobile.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

VMware prepares its virtualization stack for Docker

VMware may have pioneered enterprise virtualization, but until Monday it had been relatively quiet when it comes to Docker containers, the popular lightweight form of application virtualization.Now it’s addressing the market for Docker with two open source software packages that will allow its customers to more easily deploy containers in their existing VMware infrastructure.The company has released a Linux distribution, called Project Photon, which was designed to run within a VMware virtual machine hypervisor and contains only the barest essentials that an operating system would need for running containers. The company has also released access management software, called Project Lightwave, that gives system administrators a way to control the access to their containers.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

VMware just created its first Linux OS, and it’s container-friendly

VMware Monday announced its first operating system, and it’s designed to run containers inside the company’s virtualization management software. In announcing the Linux OS, named Project Photon, VMware is attempting to convince users who are curious about using containers that they can do so while still using the company’s software. + MORE FROM NETWORK WORLD: Will containers kill the virtual machine? + VMware As container technology has gained popularity in recent months there’s been a debate in the cloud computing and virtualization market about whether it is best to run containers on bare metal, meaning without a hypervisor, or in virtual machines. If containers run on bare metal, it could remove the need for VMware’s virtualization software.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Why the journey to IPv6 is still the road less traveled

The writing’s on the wall about the short supply of IPv4 addresses, and IPv6 has been around since 1999. Then why does the new protocol still make up just a fraction of the Internet?Though IPv6 is finished technology that works, rolling it out may be either a simple process or a complicated and risky one, depending on what role you play on the Internet. And the rewards for doing so aren’t always obvious. For one thing, making your site or service available via IPv6 only helps the relatively small number of users who are already set up with the protocol, creating a nagging chicken-and-egg problem.The new protocol, which is expected to provide more addresses than users will ever need, has made deep inroads at some big Internet companies and service providers, especially mobile operators. Yet it still drives less than 10 percent of the world’s traffic. This is despite evidence that migrating to IPv6 can simplify networks and even speed up the Web experience.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Why the journey to IPv6 is still the road less traveled

The writing’s on the wall about the short supply of IPv4 addresses, and IPv6 has been around since 1999. Then why does the new protocol still make up just a fraction of the Internet?Though IPv6 is finished technology that works, rolling it out may be either a simple process or a complicated and risky one, depending on what role you play on the Internet. And the rewards for doing so aren’t always obvious. For one thing, making your site or service available via IPv6 only helps the relatively small number of users who are already set up with the protocol, creating a nagging chicken-and-egg problem.+ Also on Network World: iPhone 7 rumor rollup +To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

The Upload: Your tech news briefing for Monday, April 20

Is Nokia on the way back to the phone market?When it sold off its device business to Microsoft, Nokia seemed to be saying goodbye to the mobile phone market it once helped define. But now sources tell re/code that projects in development at the small Nokia Technologies division indicate it’s plotting to return when it’s no longer under contract restrictions that prevent it from directly selling or licensing phones under its brand.DOJ said to be leaning against Comcast-Time Warner dealAttorneys at the U.S. Department of Justice are looking unfavorably on the proposed merger of two U.S. cable and Internet giants, Bloomberg reported. Lawyers in the antitrust division may this week recommend blocking Comcast’s bid to buy Time Warner for $45.2 billion.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here