Archive

Category Archives for "Network World Wireless"

Cray to license Fujitsu Arm processor for supercomputers

Cray says it will be the first supercomputer vendor to license Fujitsu’s A64FX Arm-based processor with high-bandwidth memory (HBM) for exascale computing.Under the agreement, Cray – now a part of HPE – is developing the first-ever commercial supercomputer powered by the A64FX processor, with initial customers being the usual suspects in HPC: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, RIKEN, Stony Brook University, and University of Bristol.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] As part of this new partnership, Cray and Fujitsu will explore engineering collaboration, co-development, and joint go-to-market to meet customer demand in the supercomputing space. Cray will also bring its Cray Programming Environment (CPE) for Arm processors over to the A64FX to optimize applications and take full advantage of SVE and HBM2.To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: SD-WAN as MPLS Replacement: Why the Internet Isn’t Enough

As companies turn to SD-WAN services, they’re often looking to migrate away from expensive MPLS services at the same time and employ Internet services instead. But the public Internet doesn’t provide the kind of predictable performance that enterprises need, and it can introduce unacceptable security risks.A sound alternative is a global, privately managed cloud-based network that can provide the consistent performance and low latency that enterprises demand, but at a fraction of the cost of MPLS – and with security built in. To get a sense for the requirements companies should look for in a managed cloud backbone to make for a successful SD-WAN migration, I spoke with Dave Greenfield, Secure Networking Evangelist with Cato Networks, which has built just such a backbone.To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: The Challenges of SD-WAN Network Planning in an Era of Unknowns

As interest in software-defined wide-area networks (SD-WAN) continues to rise, enterprises are coming face to face with the challenge of planning an SD-WAN migration that will serve the company today and into the future, forcing them to deal with a number of unknowns.The uncertainties include how fast the company will grow, whether new sites will be required, and what revenue and cash flow will look like. Existing and emerging security threats must be considered as well. About the only certainty is that cloud services will continually factor into the equation.Challenges inherent in network future-proofingNetwork planning in this kind of environment requires a degree of future-proofing, meaning implementing a network that is comprehensive and agile enough to accommodate new requirements without compromising on service quality or total cost of ownership. But doing so comes with considerable challenges.To read this article in full, please click here

Tight Wi-Fi integration is key to successful SD-Branch

The promise of SD-Branch is that by collapsing network functionality in branch offices to a unified platform, enterprises can reap benefits in speed of deployment, ease of operation and cost. Since Wi-Fi is a critical piece of local area communications for many branch sites, improved integration, security and management of Wi-Fi is becoming increasingly important to evaluating the benefits of SD-Branch solutions.In branch offices, connected LAN devices and applications must be linked to the Internet via SD-WAN services. By integrating LAN and WAN connectivity, SD-WAN helps to simplify network management with a unified platform as compared to each function having its own unique management console.To read this article in full, please click here

Cheap IoT satellite network gets approval

Space communications start-up Swarm Technologies will begin delivering commercial, bi-directional Internet of Things (IoT) data early next year, according to the company, which has just received its regulatory go-ahead to launch its satellites and transmit.“Swarm will begin rolling out its commercial, two-way data offerings in early 2020,” Sara Spangelo, co-founder and CEO told me in a recent e-mail. The company aims to deploy 150 satellites before the end of 2020, she says. The FCC, in October, granted Part 25 approval for the startup to deploy and operate 150 non-geostationary, Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, for non-voice purposes.To read this article in full, please click here

Arista targets cloud networking with CloudEOS software

Arista this week rolled out software it hopes will help customers more easily fuse enterprise-class networking with on-premises and hybrid-cloud services.The company rolled out two new packages. One, CloudEOS Multi Cloud, normalizes the network connectivity to and between private clouds or public clouds. The package sets up a virtual machine and can redirect traffic across the most effective and efficient networking path using real-time topology, in-band telemetry and other attributes, the company said. It also automatically encrypts all traffic on those paths as well. To read this article in full, please click here

AMD Epyc processors continue to gain momentum

Sales of AMD's Epyc server processors grew more than 50% over the second quarter of this year, thanks in part to the second-generation “Rome” platform in August.Q3 was a bang-up quarter for the rebounding company, with third-quarter revenue of $1.8 billion, a 9.1% year-over-year increase, and net income of 18 cents per share, in line with analyst projections. This was AMD's best quarter for revenue since 2005, when AMD was super hot and Intel was spinning its wheels.More importantly, CEO Lisa Su, in reporting the company's third quarter earnings, said AMD is on track to reach double-digit server CPU share by the middle of next year. Just a few years ago, Mercury Research, which tracks semiconductor market share, estimated Opteron market share at below one percent.To read this article in full, please click here

Digital Realty acquisition of Interxion to reshape data-center landscape

Digital Realty Trust, one of the largest data center operators in the U.S., has agreed to acquire European data center provider Interxion for $8.4 billion. The deal will put DRT ahead of Equinix in terms of size and give the San Francisco company a massive move into Europe as well as the Middle East and AsiaThe deal is strategic and complementary. DRT has about 200 data centers, mostly in the U.S but with some foreign locations as well. Interxion is a major European player, with 53 data centers in 13 of the biggest European markets, including London, Paris, Frankfurt, and Amsterdam. READ MORE: Gartner’s top 10 strategic technology trends for 2020To read this article in full, please click here

Intel unveils new Xeon E-2200 line for entry level servers

Intel is relaunching the Xeon E-2200 line, which it first introduced in May for workstations, as a low-end server processor for simpler tasks. The new chips are socket-compatible with the older E-2100 line so existing servers can be upgraded.Intel makes no bones about it, the Xeon E-2200 processors are for entry-level servers, coming in 4-core and 6-core designs as well as a new 8-core product capable of hitting 5.0 GHz with Intel’s Turbo Boost Technology 2.0.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] The Xeon E-2288G and E-2278G CPUs are the new high-end models with eight cores and 16 threads, a boost over the six-core count of the E-2100. The E-2200 is meant for single-socket systems with a maximum memory capacity of 128GB.To read this article in full, please click here

A VPN service that gets around the Great Firewall of China legally

The saying goes that China is the world’s factory. For many companies around the world, their products or components of their products are produced in mainland China. At the same time, China’s population of more than a billion people makes it one of the world’s largest consumer markets. Thus, for either production or sales, many companies want to do business in China and have established facilities there.On the networking front, this means that multinational companies need to extend their wide area network into China to support their large or rapidly growing operations—and that’s easier said than done.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Many organizations had done this using VPNs, but in early 2018, the Chinese government placed restrictions on IPsec traffic to basically block it from going in and out of the country. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said these restrictions are in accordance with the China Cross-border Data Telecommunications Industry Alliance (CDTIA), which was created to regulate cross-border data communication.To read this article in full, please click here

An SD-WAN service that gets around the Great Firewall of China legally

The saying goes that China is the world’s factory. For many companies around the world, their products or components of their products are produced in mainland China. At the same time, China’s population of more than a billion people makes it one of the world’s largest consumer markets. Thus, for either production or sales, many companies want to do business in China and have established facilities there.On the networking front, this means that multinational companies need to extend their wide area network into China to support their large or rapidly growing operations—and that’s easier said than done.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Many organizations had done this using VPNs, but in early 2018, the Chinese government placed restrictions on IPsec traffic to basically block it from going in and out of the country. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said these restrictions are in accordance with the China Cross-border Data Telecommunications Industry Alliance (CDTIA), which was created to regulate cross-border data communication.To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Performance Lies at the Heart of all Business Innovation

The Universal Quest for Speed Business innovation has always been key to the success of organizations, especially for those willing to adopt new solutions. From the first abacus and the invention of double entry bookkeeping to the introduction of the ticker tape to copy machine, technology has one thing in common – it has always enabled business to function faster and more efficiently, saving money and increasing productivity.Today’s digital innovation is no different. Applications and device functionality continue to accelerate business. And underlying those functions is the need for performance. Organizations literally spend trillions of dollars upgrading their networks and devices to generate more computing capacity to accommodate evolving business solutions. As a result, a single end user device today has more processing power, generates more data, and requires access to more digital resources than existed in the entire world just a handful of decades ago.To read this article in full, please click here

Micron finally delivers its answer to Optane

Micron Technology partnered with Intel back in 2015 to develop 3D XPoint, a new type of memory that has the storage capability of NAND flash but speed almost equal to DRAM. However, the two companies parted ways in 2018 before either of them could bring a product to market. They had completed the first generation, agreed to work on the second generation together, and decided to part after that and do their own thing for the third generation.Intel released its product under the Optane brand name. Now Micron is hitting the market with its own product under the QuantX brand. At its Insight 2019 show in San Francisco, Micron unveiled the X100, a new solid-state drive the company claims is the fastest in the world.To read this article in full, please click here

Learn how to earn a CompTIA IT certification with this $69 training bundle

There’s no shortage of IT jobs out there, especially since new tech-companies launch each year. That means that a career in IT can be stable and even lucrative. However, you’ll need to earn an IT certification before you can enter the field, and vendor-neutral CompTIA certifications are some of the most sought-after because they’re so versatile. If a career in IT sounds interesting to you, you can prepare for the CompTIA certification exams with this $69 training bundle.To read this article in full, please click here

Big Four carriers want to rule IoT by simplifying it

The Internet of Things promises a transformative impact on a wide range of industries, but along with that promise comes an enormous new level of complexity for the network and those in charge of maintaining it. For the major mobile data carriers in the U.S., that fact suggests an opportunity.The core of the carriers’ appeal for IoT users is simplicity. Opting for Verizon or AT&T instead of in-house connectivity removes a huge amount of the work involved in pulling an IoT implementation together.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Operationally, it’s the same story. The carrier is handling the network management and security functionality, and everything involved in the connectivity piece is available through a centralized management console.To read this article in full, please click here

Wireless noise protocol can extend IoT range

The effective range of Wi-Fi, and other wireless communications used in Internet of Things networks could be increased significantly by adding wireless noise, say scientists.This counter-intuitive solution could extend the range of an off-the-shelf Wi-Fi radio by 73 yards, a group led by Brigham Young University says. Wireless noise, a disturbance in the signal, is usually unwanted.To read this article in full, please click here