Andy Patrizio

Author Archives: Andy Patrizio

More signs the Qualcomm Centriq is in trouble

Last month there were rumors that Qualcomm was looking to exit the data center business and abandon the Centriq processor, an ARM-based 48-core chip designed to take on Intel in the enterprise server market. The news seemed surprising, given Qualcomm had put years of work into the chip and had only just launched it a few months earlier.Now Bloomberg adds further fuel to the fire with a report that the company is preparing to lay off almost 280 employees, and most of them are in the data center group. Bloomberg got wind of the layoffs due to filings with the state governments in North Carolina and California, which require advanced notice of significant layoffs.To read this article in full, please click here

More signs the Qualcomm Centriq is in trouble

Last month there were rumors that Qualcomm was looking to exit the data center business and abandon the Centriq processor, an ARM-based 48-core chip designed to take on Intel in the enterprise server market. The news seemed surprising, given Qualcomm had put years of work into the chip and had only just launched it a few months earlier.Now Bloomberg adds further fuel to the fire with a report that the company is preparing to lay off almost 280 employees, and most of them are in the data center group. Bloomberg got wind of the layoffs due to filings with the state governments in North Carolina and California, which require advanced notice of significant layoffs.To read this article in full, please click here

Lenovo announces hybrid liquid-cooling system: Neptune

Water cooling for enterprise servers is slowly creeping in from the fringes to the mainstream of data center use as vendors and end users alike realize the limitations of air cooling. With increased compute density, fans just don’t cut it anymore, and water cooling is far more efficient.Several vendors have adapted their cabinets to accommodate water-cooling systems, and now Lenovo is the latest to get religion on the subject with Neptune, a series of technologies for the data center. The company announced the new system at the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) in Frankfurt, Germany.[ Learn how server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Neptune is a three-pronged approach, borrowed from the legend of the Roman god of the seas Neptune, who wields a three-pointed spear. It offers direct-to-node liquid cooling, rear door heat exchangers, and hybrid cooling that mixes air and liquid, all of which is documented in a lighthearted blog post by the company.To read this article in full, please click here

Lenovo announces hybrid liquid-cooling system: Neptune

Water cooling for enterprise servers is slowly creeping in from the fringes to the mainstream of data center use as vendors and end users alike realize the limitations of air cooling. With increased compute density, fans just don’t cut it anymore, and water cooling is far more efficient.Several vendors have adapted their cabinets to accommodate water-cooling systems, and now Lenovo is the latest to get religion on the subject with Neptune, a series of technologies for the data center. The company announced the new system at the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) in Frankfurt, Germany.[ Learn how server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Neptune is a three-pronged approach, borrowed from the legend of the Roman god of the seas Neptune, who wields a three-pointed spear. It offers direct-to-node liquid cooling, rear door heat exchangers, and hybrid cooling that mixes air and liquid, all of which is documented in a lighthearted blog post by the company.To read this article in full, please click here

Oracle launches global internet ‘health’ map

While major cloud providers such as Amazon, Microsoft and Google have spent billions investing in their own networks to provide high-speed backbones, as have connectivity players like Verizon Enterprise, the fact remains that you still have to contend with regular internet traffic on a daily basis.And if your connections to the cloud seem slow, blame Netflix and YouTube, as they account for half of all internet traffic.With that headache in mind, the Oracle Internet Intelligence group has launched a free map of the global health of the internet, allowing enterprises to see where there are bottlenecks in internet traffic and perhaps route around them to their cloud providers.To read this article in full, please click here

What is Cohesity and why did it just pull in $250M in venture money?

Normally venture funding stories don’t get much play here, but when a company scores $250 million, for a grand total of $410 million raised, one has to wonder what all the hoopla is about. Especially given some of the spectacular flameouts we’ve seen over the years.But Cohesity isn’t vapor; it’s shipping a product that it claims helps solve a problem that has plagued enterprises forever: data siloing.Founded in 2013 and led by Nutanix co-founder Mohit Aron, Cohesity just racked up a $250 million investment led by SoftBank Group’s Vision Fund, which includes funding from Cisco Investments, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Morgan Stanley Expansion Capital, and Sequoia Capital. Those are some big names, to say the least.To read this article in full, please click here

What is Cohesity and why did it just pull in $250M in venture money?

Normally venture funding stories don’t get much play here, but when a company scores $250 million, for a grand total of $410 million raised, one has to wonder what all the hoopla is about. Especially given some of the spectacular flameouts we’ve seen over the years.But Cohesity isn’t vapor; it’s shipping a product that it claims helps solve a problem that has plagued enterprises forever: data siloing.Founded in 2013 and led by Nutanix co-founder Mohit Aron, Cohesity just racked up a $250 million investment led by SoftBank Group’s Vision Fund, which includes funding from Cisco Investments, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Morgan Stanley Expansion Capital, and Sequoia Capital. Those are some big names, to say the least.To read this article in full, please click here

Facebook releases its load balancer as open-source code

Google is known to fiercely guard its data center secrets, but not Facebook. The social media giant has released two significant tools it uses internally to operate its massive social network as open-source code.The company has released Katran, the load balancer that keeps the company data centers from overloading, as open source under the GNU General Public License v2.0 and available from GitHub. In addition to Katran, the company is offering details on its Zero Touch Provisioning tool, which it uses to help engineers automate much of the work required to build its backbone networks.To read this article in full, please click here

Facebook releases its load balancer as open-source code

Google is known to fiercely guard its data center secrets, but not Facebook. The social media giant has released two significant tools it uses internally to operate its massive social network as open-source code.The company has released Katran, the load balancer that keeps the company data centers from overloading, as open source under the GNU General Public License v2.0 and available from GitHub. In addition to Katran, the company is offering details on its Zero Touch Provisioning tool, which it uses to help engineers automate much of the work required to build its backbone networks.To read this article in full, please click here

Rackspace introduces data center colocation services

The effort around data center reduction has been to draw down everything, from hardware to facilities. Rackspace has an interesting new twist, though: Put your hardware in our data centers.The company announced a new data center colocation business this week, offering space, power, and network connectivity to customers who provide their own hardware. The facilities are in 10 locations around the world.It’s not a bad idea. The servers are the cheapest expense compared to facility costs, such as the physical building, power, and cooling.[ Learn how server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency and how Windows Server 2019 embraces hyperconverged data centers. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] 'Lift and shift' to the cloud The new business, dubbed Rackspace Colocation, is positioned as a way for enterprises to kick off their cloud journey by getting out of their self-managed data center to lower their expenses as they move to the cloud.To read this article in full, please click here

Rackspace introduces data center colocation services

The effort around data center reduction has been to draw down everything, from hardware to facilities. Rackspace has an interesting new twist, though: Put your hardware in our data centers.The company announced a new data center colocation business this week, offering space, power, and network connectivity to customers who provide their own hardware. The facilities are in 10 locations around the world.It’s not a bad idea. The servers are the cheapest expense compared to facility costs, such as the physical building, power, and cooling.[ Learn how server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency and how Windows Server 2019 embraces hyperconverged data centers. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] 'Lift and shift' to the cloud The new business, dubbed Rackspace Colocation, is positioned as a way for enterprises to kick off their cloud journey by getting out of their self-managed data center to lower their expenses as they move to the cloud.To read this article in full, please click here

Supermicro is the latest hardware vendor with a security issue

Security researchers with Eclypsium, a firm created by two former Intel executives that specializes in rooting out vulnerabilities in server firmware, have uncovered vulnerabilities affecting the firmware of Supermicro servers. Fortunately, it’s not easily exploited.The good news is these vulnerabilities can be exploited only via malicious software already running on a system. So, the challenge is to get the malicious code onto the servers in the first place. The bad news is these vulnerabilities are easily exploitable and can give malware the same effect as having physical access to this kind of system.“A physical attacker who can open the case could simply attach a hardware programmer to bypass protections. Using the attacks we have discovered, it is possible to scale powerful malware much more effectively through malicious software instead of physical access,” Eclypsium said in a blog post announcing its findings.To read this article in full, please click here

Supermicro is the latest hardware vendor with a security issue

Security researchers with Eclypsium, a firm created by two former Intel executives that specializes in rooting out vulnerabilities in server firmware, have uncovered vulnerabilities affecting the firmware of Supermicro servers. Fortunately, it’s not easily exploited.The good news is these vulnerabilities can be exploited only via malicious software already running on a system. So, the challenge is to get the malicious code onto the servers in the first place. The bad news is these vulnerabilities are easily exploitable and can give malware the same effect as having physical access to this kind of system.“A physical attacker who can open the case could simply attach a hardware programmer to bypass protections. Using the attacks we have discovered, it is possible to scale powerful malware much more effectively through malicious software instead of physical access,” Eclypsium said in a blog post announcing its findings.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel launches Optane, the go-between for memory and storage

Intel formally introduced the Optane DC persistent memory modules late last week, an entirely new class of memory and storage technology designed to sit between storage and memory and provide expanded memory capacity and faster access to data.Unlike SSDs, which plug into a PCI Express slot, Optane DC is built like a thick memory DIMM and plugs into the DIMM slots. Many server motherboards offer as many as eight DIMM slots per CPU, so some can be allocated to Optane and some to traditional memory.That’s important because Optane serves as a cache of sorts, storing frequently accessed data in its memory rather than forcing the server to fetch it from a hard disk. So, server memory only has to access Optane memory, which is sitting right next to it, and not a storage array over Fibre Channel.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel launches Optane, the go-between for memory and storage

Intel formally introduced the Optane DC persistent memory modules late last week, an entirely new class of memory and storage technology designed to sit between storage and memory and provide expanded memory capacity and faster access to data.Unlike SSDs, which plug into a PCI Express slot, Optane DC is built like a thick memory DIMM and plugs into the DIMM slots. Many server motherboards offer as many as eight DIMM slots per CPU, so some can be allocated to Optane and some to traditional memory.That’s important because Optane serves as a cache of sorts, storing frequently accessed data in its memory rather than forcing the server to fetch it from a hard disk. So, server memory only has to access Optane memory, which is sitting right next to it, and not a storage array over Fibre Channel.To read this article in full, please click here

Suddenly the server market is hot again

After years of shrinking sales, the server market is suddenly hot, very hot. According to the latest figures from IDC, worldwide server shipments increased 20.7% year over year to 2.7 million units in Q1 of 2018, and revenue rose 38.6%.This is the third consecutive quarter of double-digit growth, and it’s being driven by a number of factors. They include a marketwide enterprise refresh cycle, strong demand from cloud service providers, increased use of servers as the core building blocks for software-defined infrastructure, broad demand for newer CPUs, and growing deployments of next-generation workloads.Average selling prices (ASP) increased during the quarter due to richer configurations and increased component costs. The increased ASPs also contributed to revenue growth. Volume server revenue grew by 40.9%, to $15.9 billion, while midrange server revenue grew 34%, to $1.7 billion, and high-end systems grew 20.1%, to $1.2 billion.To read this article in full, please click here

Suddenly the server market is hot again

After years of shrinking sales, the server market is suddenly hot, very hot. According to the latest figures from IDC, worldwide server shipments increased 20.7% year over year to 2.7 million units in Q1 of 2018, and revenue rose 38.6%.This is the third consecutive quarter of double-digit growth, and it’s being driven by a number of factors. They include a marketwide enterprise refresh cycle, strong demand from cloud service providers, increased use of servers as the core building blocks for software-defined infrastructure, broad demand for newer CPUs, and growing deployments of next-generation workloads.Average selling prices (ASP) increased during the quarter due to richer configurations and increased component costs. The increased ASPs also contributed to revenue growth. Volume server revenue grew by 40.9%, to $15.9 billion, while midrange server revenue grew 34%, to $1.7 billion, and high-end systems grew 20.1%, to $1.2 billion.To read this article in full, please click here

AMD’s EPYC server encryption is the latest security system to fall

It’s a good thing AMD had the sense not to rub Intel’s nose in the Meltdown/Spectre vulnerability, because it would be getting it right back for this one: Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied and Integrated Safety in Germany have published a paper detailing how to compromise a virtual machine encrypted by AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV).The news is a bit of a downer for AMD, since it just added Cisco to its list of customers for the EPYC processor. Cisco announced today plans to use EPYC in its density-optimized Cisco UCS C4200 Series Rack Server Chassis and the Cisco UCS C125 M5 Rack Server Node.To read this article in full, please click here

AMD’s EPYC server encryption is the latest security system to fall

It’s a good thing AMD had the sense not to rub Intel’s nose in the Meltdown/Spectre vulnerability, because it would be getting it right back for this one: Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied and Integrated Safety in Germany have published a paper detailing how to compromise a virtual machine encrypted by AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV).The news is a bit of a downer for AMD, since it just added Cisco to its list of customers for the EPYC processor. Cisco announced today plans to use EPYC in its density-optimized Cisco UCS C4200 Series Rack Server Chassis and the Cisco UCS C125 M5 Rack Server Node.To read this article in full, please click here

AMD’s Epyc server encryption is the latest security system to fall

It’s a good thing AMD had the sense not to rub Intel’s nose in the Meltdown/Spectre vulnerability, because it would be getting it right back for this one: Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied and Integrated Safety in Germany have published a paper detailing how to compromise a virtual machine encrypted by AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV).The news is a bit of a downer for AMD, since it just added Cisco to its list of customers for the Epyc processor. Cisco announced today plans to use Epyc in its density-optimized Cisco UCS C4200 Series Rack Server Chassis and the Cisco UCS C125 M5 Rack Server Node.To read this article in full, please click here

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