Andy Patrizio

Author Archives: Andy Patrizio

Benchmarks of forthcoming Epyc 2 processor leaked

Benchmarks of engineering samples of AMD's second-generation Epyc server, code-named “Rome,” briefly found their way online and show a very beefy chip running a little slower than its predecessor.Rome is based on the Zen 2 architecture, believed to be more of an incremental improvement over the prior generation than a major leap. It’s already known that Rome would feature a 64-core, 128-thread design, but that was about all of the details.[ Also read: Who's developing quantum computers ] The details came courtesy of SiSoftware's Sandra PC analysis and benchmarking tool. It’s very popular and has been used by hobbyists and benchmarkers alike for more than 20 years. New benchmarks are uploaded to the Sandra database all the time, and what I suspect happened is someone running a Rome sample ran the benchmark, not realizing the results would be uploaded to the Sandra database.To read this article in full, please click here

Benchmarks of forthcoming Epyc 2 processor leaked

Benchmarks of engineering samples of AMD's second-generation Epyc server, code-named “Rome,” briefly found their way online and show a very beefy chip running a little slower than its predecessor.Rome is based on the Zen 2 architecture, believed to be more of an incremental improvement over the prior generation than a major leap. It’s already known that Rome would feature a 64-core, 128-thread design, but that was about all of the details.[ Also read: Who's developing quantum computers ] The details came courtesy of SiSoftware's Sandra PC analysis and benchmarking tool. It’s very popular and has been used by hobbyists and benchmarkers alike for more than 20 years. New benchmarks are uploaded to the Sandra database all the time, and what I suspect happened is someone running a Rome sample ran the benchmark, not realizing the results would be uploaded to the Sandra database.To read this article in full, please click here

French IT giant Atos enters the edge-computing business

French IT giant Atos is the latest to jump into the edge computing business with a small device called BullSequana Edge. Unlike devices from its competitors that are the size of a shipping container, including those from Vapor IO and Schneider Electronics, Atos' edge device can sit in a closet.Atos says the device uses artificial intelligence (AI) applications to offer fast response times that are needed in areas such as manufacturing 4.0, autonomous vehicles, healthcare and retail/airport security – where data needs to be processed and analyzed at the edge in real time.[ Also see: What is edge computing? and How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers.] The BullSequana Edge can be purchased as standalone infrastructure or bundled with Atos’ software edge software, and that software is pretty impressive. Atos says the BullSequana Edge supports three main categories of use cases:To read this article in full, please click here

French IT giant Atos enters the edge-computing business

French IT giant Atos is the latest to jump into the edge computing business with a small device called BullSequana Edge. Unlike devices from its competitors that are the size of a shipping container, including those from Vapor IO and Schneider Electronics, Atos' edge device can sit in a closet.Atos says the device uses artificial intelligence (AI) applications to offer fast response times that are needed in areas such as manufacturing 4.0, autonomous vehicles, healthcare and retail/airport security – where data needs to be processed and analyzed at the edge in real time.[ Also see: What is edge computing? and How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers.] The BullSequana Edge can be purchased as standalone infrastructure or bundled with Atos’ software edge software, and that software is pretty impressive. Atos says the BullSequana Edge supports three main categories of use cases:To read this article in full, please click here

Atos is the latest to enter the edge computing business

French IT giant Atos is the latest to jump into the edge computing business with a small device called BullSequana Edge. Unlike devices from its competitors that are the size of a shipping container, including those from Vapor IO and Schneider Electronics, Atos' edge device can sit in a closet.Atos says the device uses artificial intelligence (AI) applications to offer fast response times that are needed in areas such as manufacturing 4.0, autonomous vehicles, healthcare and retail/airport security – where data needs to be processed and analyzed at the edge in real time.[ Also see: What is edge computing? and How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers.] The BullSequana Edge can be purchased as standalone infrastructure or bundled with Atos’ software edge software, and that software is pretty impressive. Atos says the BullSequana Edge supports three main categories of use cases:To read this article in full, please click here

Microsoft issues fixes for non-supported versions of Windows Server

Microsoft took the rare step of issuing security fixes for both the server and desktop versions of Windows that are long out of support, so you know this is serious.The vulnerability (CVE-2019-0708) is in the Remote Desktop Services component built into all versions of Windows. RDP, formerly known as Terminal Services, itself is not vulnerable. CVE-2019-0708 is pre-authentication and requires no user interaction, meaning any future malware could self-propagate from one vulnerable machine to another.CVE-2019-0708 affects Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008. It does not impact Microsoft’s newest operating systems; Windows 8 through 10 and Windows Server 2012 through 2019 are not affected.To read this article in full, please click here

Microsoft issues fixes for non-supported versions of Windows Server

Microsoft took the rare step of issuing security fixes for both the server and desktop versions of Windows that are long out of support, so you know this is serious.The vulnerability (CVE-2019-0708) is in the Remote Desktop Services component built into all versions of Windows. RDP, formerly known as Terminal Services, itself is not vulnerable. CVE-2019-0708 is pre-authentication and requires no user interaction, meaning any future malware could self-propagate from one vulnerable machine to another.CVE-2019-0708 affects Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008. It does not impact Microsoft’s newest operating systems; Windows 8 through 10 and Windows Server 2012 through 2019 are not affected.To read this article in full, please click here

Nutanix offers unified data backup and recovery, allies with AMD

Nutanix is adding a data backup and recovery software package called Nutanix Mine to its hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) offerings, which integrates third-party data backup and recovery software with Nutanix’s Enterprise Cloud OS software.This allows Nutanix customers to manage their primary and secondary data storage and backup and recovery through a single management console. Nutanix claims that Mine will streamline overall deployment and will simplify the full lifecycle of data backup operations, including ongoing management, scaling and troubleshooting.Nutanix Mine will support a number of data backup and recovery software products, including Veeam, HYCU, Commvault, Veritas, and Unitrends.To read this article in full, please click here

Supermicro moves production from China

Server maker Supermicro, based in Fremont, California, is reportedly moving production out of China over customer concerns that the Chinese government had secretly inserted chips for spying into its motherboards.The claims were made by Bloomberg late last year in a story that cited more than 100 sources in government and private industry, including Apple and Amazon Web Services (AWS). However, Apple CEO Tim Cook and AWS CEO Andy Jassy denied the claims and called for Bloomberg to retract the article. And a few months later, the third-party investigations firm Nardello & Co examined the claims and cleared Supermicro of any surreptitious activity.To read this article in full, please click here

Supermicro moves production from China

Server maker Supermicro, based in Fremont, California, is reportedly moving production out of China over customer concerns that the Chinese government had secretly inserted chips for spying into its motherboards.The claims were made by Bloomberg late last year in a story that cited more than 100 sources in government and private industry, including Apple and Amazon Web Services (AWS). However, Apple CEO Tim Cook and AWS CEO Andy Jassy denied the claims and called for Bloomberg to retract the article. And a few months later, the third-party investigations firm Nardello & Co examined the claims and cleared Supermicro of any surreptitious activity.To read this article in full, please click here

Backblaze report shows slight uptick in HDD failure rates

Cloud backup vendor Backblaze issued its latest quarterly findings for hard-disk drive (HDD) reliability, and it shows a slight uptick in failure rates — but hardly something to fret over.All told, Backblaze has 106,238 hard drives spinning in three data center colocations, and every quarter it highlights the failure rate of each model drive it uses. The company first came to prominence several years ago when it highlighted an abnormally high failure rate of Seagate drives.The problem arose about two years after massive floods in Thailand (around 2011) ruined the manufacturing facilities of several hard drive manufacturers, with Seagate taking it especially hard. I did some reporting back then for a now-defunct publication and found out that some corners were cut to get hard drive production going again and that those cuts resulted in a bunch of time bomb hard drives with higher than average failure rates.To read this article in full, please click here

Server shipments to pick up in the second half of 2019

Global server shipments are not expected to return to growth momentum until the third quarter or even the fourth quarter of 2019, according to Taiwan-based tech news site DigiTimes, which cited unnamed server supply chain sources. The one bright spot remains cloud providers like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, which continue their buying binge.Normally I’d be reluctant to cite such a questionable source, but given most of the OEMs and ODMs are based in Taiwan and DigiTimes (the article is behind a paywall so I cannot link) has shown it has connections to them, I’m inclined to believe them.Quanta Computer chairman Barry Lam told the publication that Quanta's shipments of cloud servers have risen steadily, compared to sharp declines in shipments of enterprise servers. Lam continued that enterprise servers command only 1-2% of the firm's total server shipments.To read this article in full, please click here

Server shipments to pick up in the second half of 2019

Global server shipments are not expected to return to growth momentum until the third quarter or even the fourth quarter of 2019, according to Taiwan-based tech news site DigiTimes, which cited unnamed server supply chain sources. The one bright spot remains cloud providers like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, which continue their buying binge.Normally I’d be reluctant to cite such a questionable source, but given most of the OEMs and ODMs are based in Taiwan and DigiTimes (the article is behind a paywall so I cannot link) has shown it has connections to them, I’m inclined to believe them.Quanta Computer chairman Barry Lam told the publication that Quanta's shipments of cloud servers have risen steadily, compared to sharp declines in shipments of enterprise servers. Lam continued that enterprise servers command only 1-2% of the firm's total server shipments.To read this article in full, please click here

Some IT pros say they have too much data

A new survey has found that a growing number of IT professionals have too many data sources to even count, and they are spending more and more time just wrestling that data into usable condition.Ivanti, an IT asset management firm, surveyed 400 IT professionals on their data situation and found IT faces numerous challenges when it comes to siloes, data, and implementation. The key takeaway is data overload is starting to overwhelm IT managers and data lakes are turning into data oceans.[ Read also: Understanding mass data fragmentation | Get daily insights Sign up for Network World newsletters ] Among the findings from Ivanti's survey:To read this article in full, please click here

Some IT pros say they have too much data

A new survey has found that a growing number of IT professionals have too many data sources to even count, and they are spending more and more time just wrestling that data into usable condition.Ivanti, an IT asset management firm, surveyed 400 IT professionals on their data situation and found IT faces numerous challenges when it comes to siloes, data, and implementation. The key takeaway is data overload is starting to overwhelm IT managers and data lakes are turning into data oceans.[ Read also: Understanding mass data fragmentation | Get daily insights Sign up for Network World newsletters ] Among the findings from Ivanti's survey:To read this article in full, please click here

Dell EMC launches GPU-loaded machine learning server

The latest news from Dell Technologies World is a high-end machine learning server for the data center that has four, eight, or even 10 Nvidia Tesla V100 GPUs for processing power.The Dell EMC DSS 8440 is a two-socket server with two of the new Xeon Scalable processors and is specifically designed for machine learning applications and other demanding workloads. Each Tesla is capable of more than 100 teraflops, so the 10 GPU machine is one petaflop of processing power. Dell claims the DSS 8440 is almost on par with performance by the DGX-1, which is also Tesla-powered.[ Read also: What is quantum computing (and why enterprises should care) ] Obviously this is not a machine for beginners. That would be Dell EMC’s 740 and 7425 servers, which support up to three GPUs, and the 4140, which supports up to four GPU cards.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell EMC launches GPU-loaded machine learning server

The latest news from Dell Technologies World is a high-end machine learning server for the data center that has four, eight, or even 10 Nvidia Tesla V100 GPUs for processing power.The Dell EMC DSS 8440 is a two-socket server with two of the new Xeon Scalable processors and is specifically designed for machine learning applications and other demanding workloads. Each Tesla is capable of more than 100 teraflops, so the 10 GPU machine is one petaflop of processing power. Dell claims the DSS 8440 is almost on par with performance by the DGX-1, which is also Tesla-powered.[ Read also: What is quantum computing (and why enterprises should care) ] Obviously this is not a machine for beginners. That would be Dell EMC’s 740 and 7425 servers, which support up to three GPUs, and the 4140, which supports up to four GPU cards.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell enters the on-premises, pay-as-you-go business with VMware’s help

Dell EMC kicked off its Dell Technologies World show by announcing an alliance with VMware to offer Dell EMC hardware on-premises without having to buy it outright.The VMware Cloud on Dell EMC program offers the entire VMware software-defined data center (SDDC) stack on hyperconverged VxRail hardware. Rather than purchasing it outright, customers can pay for the service every month based on use. [ Read also: How to plan a software-defined data-center network ] Sound familiar? HP Enterprise has a similar program called GreenLake that does the same thing. Also, Dell has a program called Cloud Flex, a consumption financing offering for on-premises hardware.To read this article in full, please click here

Dell enters the on-premises, pay-as-you-go business with VMware’s help

Dell EMC kicked off its Dell Technologies World show by announcing an alliance with VMware to offer Dell EMC hardware on-premises without having to buy it outright.The VMware Cloud on Dell EMC program offers the entire VMware software-defined data center (SDDC) stack on hyperconverged VxRail hardware. Rather than purchasing it outright, customers can pay for the service every month based on use. [ Read also: How to plan a software-defined data-center network ] Sound familiar? HP Enterprise has a similar program called GreenLake that does the same thing. Also, Dell has a program called Cloud Flex, a consumption financing offering for on-premises hardware.To read this article in full, please click here

Vapor IO provides direct, high-speed connections from the edge to AWS

Edge computing startup Vapor IO now offers a direct connection between its edge containers to Amazon Web Services (AWS) via a high-speed fiber network link.The company said that connection between its Kinetic Edge containers and AWS will be provided by Crown Castle's Cloud Connect fiber network, which uses Amazon Direct Connect Services. This would help reduce network latency by essentially drawing a straight fiber line from Vapor IO's edge computing data centers to Amazon's cloud computing data centers.“When combined with Crown Castle’s high-speed Cloud Connect fiber, the Kinetic Edge lets AWS developers build applications that span the entire continuum from core to edge. By enabling new classes of applications at the edge, we make it possible for any AWS developer to unlock the next generation of real-time, innovative use cases,” wrote Matt Trifiro, chief marketing officer of Vapor IO, in a blog post.To read this article in full, please click here

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