Andy Patrizio

Author Archives: Andy Patrizio

AMD now wants to take on Nvidia in the data center

There’s no doubt that AMD’s graphics business has kept the company afloat when its CPU business stunk. More than once I saw quarterly numbers that showed all the profitability was coming from the GPU side of the market.The split between it and Nvidia is about 2:1, according to Steam analytics. Nvidia just has tremendous momentum and hasn’t lost it. And it allowed the company to branch out into artificial intelligence (AI) so thoroughly that gaming has almost become secondary to the firm. Not that they are leaving gamers hanging; they just aren’t the top priority any more.With AMD on the upswing on the CPU side, the company has decided to finally stop ceding the whole data center to Nvidia. And this week it introduced two new GPUs with the data center and HPC/AI workloads in mind.To read this article in full, please click here

AMD now wants to take on Nvidia in the data center

There’s no doubt that AMD’s graphics business has kept the company afloat when its CPU business stunk. More than once I saw quarterly numbers that showed all the profitability was coming from the GPU side of the market.The split between it and Nvidia is about 2:1, according to Steam analytics. Nvidia just has tremendous momentum and hasn’t lost it. And it allowed the company to branch out into artificial intelligence (AI) so thoroughly that gaming has almost become secondary to the firm. Not that they are leaving gamers hanging; they just aren’t the top priority any more.With AMD on the upswing on the CPU side, the company has decided to finally stop ceding the whole data center to Nvidia. And this week it introduced two new GPUs with the data center and HPC/AI workloads in mind.To read this article in full, please click here

AMD continues server push, introduces Zen 2 architecture

Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) revealed the Zen 2 architecture for its family of both desktop/laptop and server microprocessors that it plans to launch in 2019, with a promise of twice the performance throughput over the previous generation. The news came at a briefing in San Francisco that saw a number of AMD announcements.Zen is the core architecture. On the desktop and notebooks, it’s sold under the Ryzen brand name. For servers, it’s sold under the Epyc brand. The next generation of Epyc, code-named Rome, is due next year.Zen made AMD competitive with Intel once again after the disastrous line of subpar processors named after heavy equipment (Bulldozer, Piledriver, Steamroller). With Zen 2, AMD hopes to surpass Intel in all aspects of performance.To read this article in full, please click here

AMD continues server push, introduces Zen 2 architecture

Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) revealed the Zen 2 architecture for its family of both desktop/laptop and server microprocessors that it plans to launch in 2019, with a promise of twice the performance throughput over the previous generation. The news came at a briefing in San Francisco that saw a number of AMD announcements.Zen is the core architecture. On the desktop and notebooks, it’s sold under the Ryzen brand name. For servers, it’s sold under the Epyc brand. The next generation of Epyc, code-named Rome, is due next year.Zen made AMD competitive with Intel once again after the disastrous line of subpar processors named after heavy equipment (Bulldozer, Piledriver, Steamroller). With Zen 2, AMD hopes to surpass Intel in all aspects of performance.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel responds to the Epyc server threat from AMD

I do love seeing the chip market get competitive again. Intel has formally announced a new class of Xeon Scalable processors, code-named “Cascade Lake-AP” or Cascade Lake Advanced Performance, that in many ways leapfrogs the best AMD has to offer.The news comes ahead of the Supercomputing 18 show and was likely done to avoid being drowned out in the upcoming news. It also comes one day ahead of an AMD announcement, which should be hitting the wires as you read this. I don’t think that’s a coincidence.The Cascade Lake-AP processors come with up to 48 cores and support for 12 channels of DDR4 memory, a big leap over the old design and a leap over AMD’s Epyc server processors, as well. Intel’s current top-of-the-line processor, the Xeon Platinum 8180, has only 28 cores and six memory channels, while the AMD Epyc has 32 cores and eight memory channels.To read this article in full, please click here

Intel responds to the Epyc server threat from AMD

I do love seeing the chip market get competitive again. Intel has formally announced a new class of Xeon Scalable processors, code-named “Cascade Lake-AP” or Cascade Lake Advanced Performance, that in many ways leapfrogs the best AMD has to offer.The news comes ahead of the Supercomputing 18 show and was likely done to avoid being drowned out in the upcoming news. It also comes one day ahead of an AMD announcement, which should be hitting the wires as you read this. I don’t think that’s a coincidence.The Cascade Lake-AP processors come with up to 48 cores and support for 12 channels of DDR4 memory, a big leap over the old design and a leap over AMD’s Epyc server processors, as well. Intel’s current top-of-the-line processor, the Xeon Platinum 8180, has only 28 cores and six memory channels, while the AMD Epyc has 32 cores and eight memory channels.To read this article in full, please click here

Is Oracle’s silence on its on-premises servers cause for concern?

When Oracle consumed Sun Microsystems in January 2010, founder Larry Ellison promised new hiring and new investment in the hardware line, plus a plan to offer fully integrated, turnkey systems.By and large, he kept that promise. Oracle dispensed with the commodity server market in favor of high-end, decked-out servers such as Exadata and Exalogic fully loaded with Oracle software, which included Java.Earlier this year, word leaked that the company had gutted its Solaris Unix and Sparc processor development, but after eight years of spinning its wheels, no one could say Oracle had been impatient. It had invested rather heavily in Sparc for a long time, but the writing was on the wall.To read this article in full, please click here

Is Oracle’s silence on its on-premises servers cause for concern?

When Oracle consumed Sun Microsystems in January 2010, founder Larry Ellison promised new hiring and new investment in the hardware line, plus a plan to offer fully integrated, turnkey systems.By and large, he kept that promise. Oracle dispensed with the commodity server market in favor of high-end, decked-out servers such as Exadata and Exalogic fully loaded with Oracle software, which included Java.Earlier this year, word leaked that the company had gutted its Solaris Unix and Sparc processor development, but after eight years of spinning its wheels, no one could say Oracle had been impatient. It had invested rather heavily in Sparc for a long time, but the writing was on the wall.To read this article in full, please click here

Cray introduces a multi-CPU supercomputer design

Supercomputer maker Cray announced what it calls its last supercomputer architecture before entering the era of exascale computing. It is code-named “Shasta,” and the Department of Energy, already a regular customer of supercomputing, said it will be the first to deploy it, in 2020.The Shasta architecture is unique in that it will be the first server (unless someone beats Cray to it) to support multiple processor types. Users will be able to deploy a mix of x86, GPU, ARM and FPGA processors in a single system.Up to now, servers either came with x86 or, in a few select cases, ARM processors, with GPUs and FPGAs as add-in cards plugged into PCI Express slots. This will be the first case of fully native onboard processors, and I hardly expect Cray to be alone in using this design.To read this article in full, please click here

Cray introduces a multi-CPU supercomputer design

Supercomputer maker Cray announced what it calls its last supercomputer architecture before entering the era of exascale computing. It is code-named “Shasta,” and the Department of Energy, already a regular customer of supercomputing, said it will be the first to deploy it, in 2020.The Shasta architecture is unique in that it will be the first server (unless someone beats Cray to it) to support multiple processor types. Users will be able to deploy a mix of x86, GPU, ARM and FPGA processors in a single system.Up to now, servers either came with x86 or, in a few select cases, ARM processors, with GPUs and FPGAs as add-in cards plugged into PCI Express slots. This will be the first case of fully native onboard processors, and I hardly expect Cray to be alone in using this design.To read this article in full, please click here

Rackspace launches disaster recovery as a service program

Give managed cloud computing provider Rackspace points for timing. Coming right after the Uptime Institute issued a warning for data center operators to improve their environmental disaster plans, the company announced it is broadening its existing disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) program for on-premises, colocation, and multi-cloud environments.The expansion utilizes Zerto’s disaster recovery software, which is specifically designed to provide business continuity and disaster recovery in a cloud and virtualized environment.To read this article in full, please click here

Rackspace launches disaster recovery as a service program

Give managed cloud computing provider Rackspace points for timing. Coming right after the Uptime Institute issued a warning for data center operators to improve their environmental disaster plans, the company announced it is broadening its existing disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) program for on-premises, colocation, and multi-cloud environments.The expansion utilizes Zerto’s disaster recovery software, which is specifically designed to provide business continuity and disaster recovery in a cloud and virtualized environment.To read this article in full, please click here

OpenStack Foundation releases software platform for edge computing

The OpenStack Foundation, the joint project created by NASA and Rackspace to create a freely usable Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) platform, has announced the initial release of StarlingX, a platform for edge computing.StarlingX is designed for remote edge environments, offering node configuration in host, service management, and perform software updates remotely. It can also warn operators if there are any issues with the servers or the network.The foundation says the platform is optimized for low-latency, high-performance applications in edge network scenarios and is primarily aimed at carrier networking, industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), and Internet of Things (IoT).To read this article in full, please click here

Xilinx lines up three major Chinese hardware vendors as OEM partners

Xilinx isn’t about to sit on its hands in the FPGA battle with Intel. The last major independent FPGA chip maker is supplementing its partnership with AMD by teaming with three of the largest cloud vendors in China as well as Amazon Web Services (AWS).At its developer forum in Beijing, Xilinx announced that Alibaba Cloud, Huawei, and server vendor Inspur will begin to offer data center platforms based on Xilinx’s FPGA-as-a-service model, mostly targeting artificial intelligence (AI) inference workloads.[ Learn how server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Separately, Xilinx announced a partnership with AWS to begin previewing FPGA instances in its Chinese regional hub in Beijing. You have to figure that will eventually make its way to the U.S., but there is nothing concrete as of yet.To read this article in full, please click here

Xilinx lines up three major Chinese hardware vendors as OEM partners

Xilinx isn’t about to sit on its hands in the FPGA battle with Intel. The last major independent FPGA chip maker is supplementing its partnership with AMD by teaming with three of the largest cloud vendors in China as well as Amazon Web Services (AWS).At its developer forum in Beijing, Xilinx announced that Alibaba Cloud, Huawei, and server vendor Inspur will begin to offer data center platforms based on Xilinx’s FPGA-as-a-service model, mostly targeting artificial intelligence (AI) inference workloads.[ Learn how server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Separately, Xilinx announced a partnership with AWS to begin previewing FPGA instances in its Chinese regional hub in Beijing. You have to figure that will eventually make its way to the U.S., but there is nothing concrete as of yet.To read this article in full, please click here

Lenovo, Scale partner for hyperconverged edge servers

OEM Lenovo and hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) platform developer Scale Computing have partnered to offer an out-of-the-box HCI platform specifically for edge computing deployments.Dubbed the Scale Computing HC3 Edge Platform on Lenovo Servers, the solution is an integration of Scale's HC3 software platform — what it calls “a data center in a box” — on Lenovo server hardware. HC3 brings together compute, storage, and virtualization into a comprehensive system with automated management.The Lenovo/Scale solution provides "edge infrastructure that has the capacity to run various IT and OT workloads, is space-conscious, and can be managed at each individual location by generalists," said Wilfredo Sotolongo, vice president and general manager of IoT for Lenovo's data center group, in a statement.To read this article in full, please click here

Lenovo, Scale partner for hyperconverged edge servers

OEM Lenovo and hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) platform developer Scale Computing have partnered to offer an out-of-the-box HCI platform specifically for edge computing deployments.Dubbed the Scale Computing HC3 Edge Platform on Lenovo Servers, the solution is an integration of Scale's HC3 software platform — what it calls “a data center in a box” — on Lenovo server hardware. HC3 brings together compute, storage, and virtualization into a comprehensive system with automated management.The Lenovo/Scale solution provides "edge infrastructure that has the capacity to run various IT and OT workloads, is space-conscious, and can be managed at each individual location by generalists," said Wilfredo Sotolongo, vice president and general manager of IoT for Lenovo's data center group, in a statement.To read this article in full, please click here

Uptime Institute issues a weather warning for data centers

Data center operators have to take a number of contingencies into account, but many are failing to pay attention to the increase in natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, and wildfires.That’s the word from The 451 Group’s Uptime Institute, which published a report on the impact of natural disasters on data centers. Uptime issued the report to remind data center operators of the growing impact of climate change on data center operations.“Climate change is making us rethink resiliency and operational uptime. Now more than ever, it is crucial to understand any potential vulnerabilities to make new and existing facilities better prepared for extreme weather events,” the report states.To read this article in full, please click here

Uptime Institute issues a weather warning for data centers

Data center operators have to take a number of contingencies into account, but many are failing to pay attention to the increase in natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, and wildfires.That’s the word from The 451 Group’s Uptime Institute, which published a report on the impact of natural disasters on data centers. Uptime issued the report to remind data center operators of the growing impact of climate change on data center operations.“Climate change is making us rethink resiliency and operational uptime. Now more than ever, it is crucial to understand any potential vulnerabilities to make new and existing facilities better prepared for extreme weather events,” the report states.To read this article in full, please click here

Huawei targets Nvidia, Intel, Qualcomm with new AI chips

Chinese smartphone giant Huawei Technologies Co. announced at its Huawei Connect 2018 show in Shanghai an update to its Ascend artificial intelligence (AI) chips with a new set of cloud services, software, tools, training, and framework.The company is putting itself in direct competition with the main AI chip developers in the U.S., namely Nvidia, Intel, and Qualcomm, but also ARM, IBM, to some degree Google, and even fellow Chinese tech giant Alibaba.Chairman Eric Xu introduced the Ascend 910 and Ascend 310 chips along with the Compute Architecture for Neural Networks (CANN), a chip operators library and automated operators development toolkit, and MindSpore, an inference framework for devices, edge networks, and cloud training.To read this article in full, please click here

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