Linda Musthaler

Author Archives: Linda Musthaler

Get ready for the convergence of IT and OT networking and security

Most IT networking professionals are so busy with their day-to-day responsibilities that they don’t have time to consider taking on more work. But for companies with an industrial component, there’s an elephant in the room that is clamoring for attention. I’m talking about the increasingly common convergence of IT and operational technology (OT) networking and security.Traditionally, IT and OT have had very separate roles in an organization. IT is typically tasked with moving data between computers and humans, whereas OT is tasked with moving data between “things,” such as sensors, actuators, smart machines, and other devices to enhance manufacturing and industrial processes. Not only were the roles for IT and OT completely separate, but their technologies and networks were, too.To read this article in full, please click here

Get ready for the convergence of IT and OT networking and security

Most IT networking professionals are so busy with their day-to-day responsibilities that they don’t have time to consider taking on more work. But for companies with an industrial component, there’s an elephant in the room that is clamoring for attention. I’m talking about the increasingly common convergence of IT and operational technology (OT) networking and security.Traditionally, IT and OT have had very separate roles in an organization. IT is typically tasked with moving data between computers and humans, whereas OT is tasked with moving data between “things,” such as sensors, actuators, smart machines, and other devices to enhance manufacturing and industrial processes. Not only were the roles for IT and OT completely separate, but their technologies and networks were, too.To read this article in full, please click here

Tempered Networks simplifies secure network connectivity and microsegmentation

The TCP/IP protocol is the foundation of the internet and pretty much every single network out there. The protocol was designed 45 years ago and was originally only created for connectivity. There’s nothing in the protocol for security, mobility, or trusted authentication.The fundamental problem with TCP/IP is that the IP address within the protocol represents both the device location and the device identity on a network. This dual functionality of the address lacks the basic mechanisms for security and mobility of devices on a network.This is one of the reasons networks are so complicated today. To connect to things on a network or over the internet, you need VPNs, firewalls, routers, cell modems, etc. and you have all the configurations that come with ACLs, VLANs, certificates, and so on. The nightmare grows exponentially when you factor in internet of things (IoT) device connectivity and security. It’s all unsustainable at scale.To read this article in full, please click here

Tempered Networks simplifies secure network connectivity and microsegmentation

The TCP/IP protocol is the foundation of the internet and pretty much every single network out there. The protocol was designed 45 years ago and was originally only created for connectivity. There’s nothing in the protocol for security, mobility, or trusted authentication.The fundamental problem with TCP/IP is that the IP address within the protocol represents both the device location and the device identity on a network. This dual functionality of the address lacks the basic mechanisms for security and mobility of devices on a network.This is one of the reasons networks are so complicated today. To connect to things on a network or over the internet, you need VPNs, firewalls, routers, cell modems, etc. and you have all the configurations that come with ACLs, VLANs, certificates, and so on. The nightmare grows exponentially when you factor in internet of things (IoT) device connectivity and security. It’s all unsustainable at scale.To read this article in full, please click here

Teridion’s entry in the MNS market supports enterprise wide-area networking

A few months ago, I wrote about the managed network services (MNS) market as the evolutionary direction of the network carrier. One of the companies that plays in this space is Teridion, with a service called Teridion for Enterprise. It’s a global WAN service with some unique capabilities to support performance and reliability that enterprises can really appreciate.Teridion for Enterprise is a cloud-centric solution all the way. The network is built in the cloud, and customers use commodity edge devices such as SD-WAN appliances or Cisco ISR boxes to connect. Customers request services, make changes and set policies through an easy and contemporary user interface; they pay only for the capacity they use; and all maintenance and management is completely handled by Teridion.To read this article in full, please click here

Allied Telesis turns its networking focus to the U.S. market

I recently had the opportunity to talk to Mark Wutzke, chief solution architect with Allied Telesis, to learn about the company’s smart networking offerings. Perhaps you, like me, don’t know much about this networking company, though it’s been in business since 1987. That might be because the global company, until recently, has focused its efforts outside the U.S. However, that focus is beginning to change, so I wanted to learn what the company brings to the table that enterprises would be interested in.First, a little background on the company. Allied Telesis is headquartered in both Japan and the U.S. The company has global R&D centers and manufactures its own products. Among the products are intelligent switches and stackable chassis, industrial switches, wireless solutions, firewalls and routers, optics, NICs and media converters—basically end-to-end solutions from edge to core for LAN, WLAN and WAN. In addition, Allied Telesis writes its own operating system software for its equipment, as well as the network management software that provides many of the smart networking features the company is touting today.To read this article in full, please click here

Beyond SD-WAN: VMware’s vision for the network edge

VeloCloud is now a Business Unit within VMware since being acquired in December 2017. The two companies have had sufficient time to integrate their operations and fit their technologies together to build a cohesive offering. In January, Neal Weinberg provided an overview of where VMware is headed with its reinvention. Now let’s look at it from the VeloCloud SD-WAN perspective.I recently talked to Sanjay Uppal, vice president and general manager of the VeloCloud Business Unit. He shared with me where VeloCloud is heading, adding that it’s all possible because of the complementary products that VMware brings to VeloCloud’s table.To read this article in full, please click here

Meta Networks builds user security into its Network-as-a-Service

Network-as-a-Service (NaaS) is growing in popularity and availability for those organizations that don’t want to host their own LAN or WAN, or that want to complement or replace their traditional network with something far easier to manage.With NaaS, a service provider creates a multi-tenant wide area network comprised of geographically dispersed points of presence (PoPs) connected via high-speed Tier 1 carrier links that create the network backbone. The PoPs peer with cloud services to facilitate customer access to cloud applications such as SaaS offerings, as well as to infrastructure services from the likes of Amazon, Google and Microsoft. User organizations connect to the network from whatever facilities they have — data centers, branch offices, or even individual client devices — typically via SD-WAN appliances and/or VPNs.To read this article in full, please click here

Meta Networks builds user security into its Network-as-a-Service

Network-as-a-Service (NaaS) is growing in popularity and availability for those organizations that don’t want to host their own LAN or WAN, or that want to complement or replace their traditional network with something far easier to manage.With NaaS, a service provider creates a multi-tenant wide area network comprised of geographically dispersed points of presence (PoPs) connected via high-speed Tier 1 carrier links that create the network backbone. The PoPs peer with cloud services to facilitate customer access to cloud applications such as SaaS offerings, as well as to infrastructure services from the likes of Amazon, Google and Microsoft. User organizations connect to the network from whatever facilities they have — data centers, branch offices, or even individual client devices — typically via SD-WAN appliances and/or VPNs.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined perimeter brings trusted access to multi-cloud applications, network resources

Many companies today have a hybrid approach to their networking and IT infrastructure. Some elements remain in an on-premise data center, while other portions have gone to the cloud and even to multi-cloud. As a result, the network perimeter is permeable and elastic. This complicates access requirements at a time when it’s more important than ever to enable accessibility while preventing unauthorized access to applications and data.To reduce risk, some organizations are applying a zero-trust strategy of “verification before trust” by incorporating stronger, stateful user and device authentication; granular access control; and enhanced segmentation no matter where the applications and resources reside.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined perimeter brings trusted access to multi-cloud applications, network resources

Many companies today have a hybrid approach to their networking and IT infrastructure. Some elements remain in an on-premise data center, while other portions have gone to the cloud and even to multi-cloud. As a result, the network perimeter is permeable and elastic. This complicates access requirements at a time when it’s more important than ever to enable accessibility while preventing unauthorized access to applications and data.To reduce risk, some organizations are applying a zero-trust strategy of “verification before trust” by incorporating stronger, stateful user and device authentication; granular access control; and enhanced segmentation no matter where the applications and resources reside.To read this article in full, please click here

How managed network services are evolving to simplify the global WAN

Fundamentally, the way that carriers (i.e. telcos) deliver managed network services hasn’t changed in decades. The core architecture of this network, known as hub and spoke, consists of branches talking to the data center over a managed network with a separate firewall in the middle. However, this type of legacy WAN can’t support today’s business needs, which include a seminal shift to the cloud, as well as mobile users that need network access from anywhere, not just from the branch.Yishay Yovel, vice president of market strategy at Cato Networks, has followed the carriers’ dilemma for years. According to Yovel, there are numerous catalysts to this evolutionary change in the managed network services market.To read this article in full, please click here

How managed network services are evolving to simplify the global WAN

Fundamentally, the way that carriers (i.e. telcos) deliver managed network services hasn’t changed in decades. The core architecture of this network, known as hub and spoke, consists of branches talking to the data center over a managed network with a separate firewall in the middle. However, this type of legacy WAN can’t support today’s business needs, which include a seminal shift to the cloud, as well as mobile users that need network access from anywhere, not just from the branch.Yishay Yovel, vice president of market strategy at Cato Networks, has followed the carriers’ dilemma for years. According to Yovel, there are numerous catalysts to this evolutionary change in the managed network services market.To read this article in full, please click here

How managed network services are evolving to simplify the global WAN

Fundamentally, the way that carriers (i.e. telcos) deliver managed network services hasn’t changed in decades. The core architecture of this network, known as hub and spoke, consists of branches talking to the data center over a managed network with a separate firewall in the middle. However, this type of legacy WAN can’t support today’s business needs, which include a seminal shift to the cloud, as well as mobile users that need network access from anywhere, not just from the branch.Yishay Yovel, vice president of market strategy at Cato Networks, has followed the carriers’ dilemma for years. According to Yovel, there are numerous catalysts to this evolutionary change in the managed network services market.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined connectivity planned for colocation data centers

Gartner predicts that by 2025, 80 percent of enterprises will migrate entirely away from their on-premises data centers. Instead they’ll follow the current trend of moving workloads to colocation, hosting and the cloud, leading them to shut down their traditional data centers.I’m sure that colocation centers look forward to the growth in business, but the growth also means the colocation data centers need to become more agile, scalable, and flexible. This is absolutely critical to their business model viability, but the challenge to get there is greater than ever.[ Also read: How to plan a software-defined data-center network and Efficient container use requires data-center software networking ] Colocation providers have long benefitted from offering cross-connect and IT services, as well as Layer 2 WAN connectivity. However, these traditional offerings really aren't meeting the emerging demands from enterprise tenants who want more integrated, more secure and more automated networking solutions. As workloads move across different environments, such as SaaS and public clouds, there are management and operational challenges for colocation providers who are now being asked to support a more diverse portfolio of connectivity solutions.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined connectivity planned for colocation data centers

Gartner predicts that by 2025, 80 percent of enterprises will migrate entirely away from their on-premises data centers. Instead they’ll follow the current trend of moving workloads to colocation, hosting and the cloud, leading them to shut down their traditional data centers.I’m sure that colocation centers look forward to the growth in business, but the growth also means the colocation data centers need to become more agile, scalable, and flexible. This is absolutely critical to their business model viability, but the challenge to get there is greater than ever.[ Also read: How to plan a software-defined data-center network and Efficient container use requires data-center software networking ] Colocation providers have long benefitted from offering cross-connect and IT services, as well as Layer 2 WAN connectivity. However, these traditional offerings really aren't meeting the emerging demands from enterprise tenants who want more integrated, more secure and more automated networking solutions. As workloads move across different environments, such as SaaS and public clouds, there are management and operational challenges for colocation providers who are now being asked to support a more diverse portfolio of connectivity solutions.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined connectivity planned for colocation data centers

Gartner predicts that by 2025, 80 percent of enterprises will migrate entirely away from their on-premises data centers. Instead they’ll follow the current trend of moving workloads to colocation, hosting and the cloud, leading them to shut down their traditional data centers.I’m sure that colocation centers look forward to the growth in business, but the growth also means the colocation data centers need to become more agile, scalable, and flexible. This is absolutely critical to their business model viability, but the challenge to get there is greater than ever.[ Also read: How to plan a software-defined data-center network and Efficient container use requires data-center software networking ] Colocation providers have long benefitted from offering cross-connect and IT services, as well as Layer 2 WAN connectivity. However, these traditional offerings really aren't meeting the emerging demands from enterprise tenants who want more integrated, more secure and more automated networking solutions. As workloads move across different environments, such as SaaS and public clouds, there are management and operational challenges for colocation providers who are now being asked to support a more diverse portfolio of connectivity solutions.To read this article in full, please click here

How SD-WAN can improve your security strategy

Data breaches and security threats are a top concern among IT leaders, yet it’s harder than ever to hire skilled security professionals. That has organizations looking for ways to more easily improve their security strategy. One option is to implement a software-defined WAN (SD-WAN).I recently talked with Hamza Seqqat, director of solutions architecture at Apcela, to get his take on how SD-WAN affects security strategy. Seqqat helps enterprise organizations redefine their wide-area networks to accommodate the growing use of cloud-based applications and services. In our discussion, he outlined four areas where SD-WAN offers new security benefits.To read this article in full, please click here

How SD-WAN can improve your security strategy

Data breaches and security threats are a top concern among IT leaders, yet it’s harder than ever to hire skilled security professionals. That has organizations looking for ways to more easily improve their security strategy. One option is to implement a software-defined WAN (SD-WAN).I recently talked with Hamza Seqqat, director of solutions architecture at Apcela, to get his take on how SD-WAN affects security strategy. Seqqat helps enterprise organizations redefine their wide-area networks to accommodate the growing use of cloud-based applications and services. In our discussion, he outlined four areas where SD-WAN offers new security benefits.To read this article in full, please click here

How SD-WAN can improve your security strategy

Data breaches and security threats are a top concern among IT leaders, yet it’s harder than ever to hire skilled security professionals. That has organizations looking for ways to more easily improve their security strategy. One option is to implement a software-defined WAN (SD-WAN).I recently talked with Hamza Seqqat, director of solutions architecture at Apcela, to get his take on how SD-WAN affects security strategy. Seqqat helps enterprise organizations redefine their wide-area networks to accommodate the growing use of cloud-based applications and services. In our discussion, he outlined four areas where SD-WAN offers new security benefits.To read this article in full, please click here

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