Linda Musthaler

Author Archives: Linda Musthaler

Software-defined perimeter brings trusted access to multi-cloud applications, network resources

Many companies today have a hybrid approach to their networking and IT infrastructure. Some elements remain in an on-premise data center, while other portions have gone to the cloud and even to multi-cloud. As a result, the network perimeter is permeable and elastic. This complicates access requirements at a time when it’s more important than ever to enable accessibility while preventing unauthorized access to applications and data.To reduce risk, some organizations are applying a zero-trust strategy of “verification before trust” by incorporating stronger, stateful user and device authentication; granular access control; and enhanced segmentation no matter where the applications and resources reside.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined perimeter brings trusted access to multi-cloud applications, network resources

Many companies today have a hybrid approach to their networking and IT infrastructure. Some elements remain in an on-premise data center, while other portions have gone to the cloud and even to multi-cloud. As a result, the network perimeter is permeable and elastic. This complicates access requirements at a time when it’s more important than ever to enable accessibility while preventing unauthorized access to applications and data.To reduce risk, some organizations are applying a zero-trust strategy of “verification before trust” by incorporating stronger, stateful user and device authentication; granular access control; and enhanced segmentation no matter where the applications and resources reside.To read this article in full, please click here

How managed network services are evolving to simplify the global WAN

Fundamentally, the way that carriers (i.e. telcos) deliver managed network services hasn’t changed in decades. The core architecture of this network, known as hub and spoke, consists of branches talking to the data center over a managed network with a separate firewall in the middle. However, this type of legacy WAN can’t support today’s business needs, which include a seminal shift to the cloud, as well as mobile users that need network access from anywhere, not just from the branch.Yishay Yovel, vice president of market strategy at Cato Networks, has followed the carriers’ dilemma for years. According to Yovel, there are numerous catalysts to this evolutionary change in the managed network services market.To read this article in full, please click here

How managed network services are evolving to simplify the global WAN

Fundamentally, the way that carriers (i.e. telcos) deliver managed network services hasn’t changed in decades. The core architecture of this network, known as hub and spoke, consists of branches talking to the data center over a managed network with a separate firewall in the middle. However, this type of legacy WAN can’t support today’s business needs, which include a seminal shift to the cloud, as well as mobile users that need network access from anywhere, not just from the branch.Yishay Yovel, vice president of market strategy at Cato Networks, has followed the carriers’ dilemma for years. According to Yovel, there are numerous catalysts to this evolutionary change in the managed network services market.To read this article in full, please click here

How managed network services are evolving to simplify the global WAN

Fundamentally, the way that carriers (i.e. telcos) deliver managed network services hasn’t changed in decades. The core architecture of this network, known as hub and spoke, consists of branches talking to the data center over a managed network with a separate firewall in the middle. However, this type of legacy WAN can’t support today’s business needs, which include a seminal shift to the cloud, as well as mobile users that need network access from anywhere, not just from the branch.Yishay Yovel, vice president of market strategy at Cato Networks, has followed the carriers’ dilemma for years. According to Yovel, there are numerous catalysts to this evolutionary change in the managed network services market.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined connectivity planned for colocation data centers

Gartner predicts that by 2025, 80 percent of enterprises will migrate entirely away from their on-premises data centers. Instead they’ll follow the current trend of moving workloads to colocation, hosting and the cloud, leading them to shut down their traditional data centers.I’m sure that colocation centers look forward to the growth in business, but the growth also means the colocation data centers need to become more agile, scalable, and flexible. This is absolutely critical to their business model viability, but the challenge to get there is greater than ever.[ Also read: How to plan a software-defined data-center network and Efficient container use requires data-center software networking ] Colocation providers have long benefitted from offering cross-connect and IT services, as well as Layer 2 WAN connectivity. However, these traditional offerings really aren't meeting the emerging demands from enterprise tenants who want more integrated, more secure and more automated networking solutions. As workloads move across different environments, such as SaaS and public clouds, there are management and operational challenges for colocation providers who are now being asked to support a more diverse portfolio of connectivity solutions.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined connectivity planned for colocation data centers

Gartner predicts that by 2025, 80 percent of enterprises will migrate entirely away from their on-premises data centers. Instead they’ll follow the current trend of moving workloads to colocation, hosting and the cloud, leading them to shut down their traditional data centers.I’m sure that colocation centers look forward to the growth in business, but the growth also means the colocation data centers need to become more agile, scalable, and flexible. This is absolutely critical to their business model viability, but the challenge to get there is greater than ever.[ Also read: How to plan a software-defined data-center network and Efficient container use requires data-center software networking ] Colocation providers have long benefitted from offering cross-connect and IT services, as well as Layer 2 WAN connectivity. However, these traditional offerings really aren't meeting the emerging demands from enterprise tenants who want more integrated, more secure and more automated networking solutions. As workloads move across different environments, such as SaaS and public clouds, there are management and operational challenges for colocation providers who are now being asked to support a more diverse portfolio of connectivity solutions.To read this article in full, please click here

Software-defined connectivity planned for colocation data centers

Gartner predicts that by 2025, 80 percent of enterprises will migrate entirely away from their on-premises data centers. Instead they’ll follow the current trend of moving workloads to colocation, hosting and the cloud, leading them to shut down their traditional data centers.I’m sure that colocation centers look forward to the growth in business, but the growth also means the colocation data centers need to become more agile, scalable, and flexible. This is absolutely critical to their business model viability, but the challenge to get there is greater than ever.[ Also read: How to plan a software-defined data-center network and Efficient container use requires data-center software networking ] Colocation providers have long benefitted from offering cross-connect and IT services, as well as Layer 2 WAN connectivity. However, these traditional offerings really aren't meeting the emerging demands from enterprise tenants who want more integrated, more secure and more automated networking solutions. As workloads move across different environments, such as SaaS and public clouds, there are management and operational challenges for colocation providers who are now being asked to support a more diverse portfolio of connectivity solutions.To read this article in full, please click here

How SD-WAN can improve your security strategy

Data breaches and security threats are a top concern among IT leaders, yet it’s harder than ever to hire skilled security professionals. That has organizations looking for ways to more easily improve their security strategy. One option is to implement a software-defined WAN (SD-WAN).I recently talked with Hamza Seqqat, director of solutions architecture at Apcela, to get his take on how SD-WAN affects security strategy. Seqqat helps enterprise organizations redefine their wide-area networks to accommodate the growing use of cloud-based applications and services. In our discussion, he outlined four areas where SD-WAN offers new security benefits.To read this article in full, please click here

How SD-WAN can improve your security strategy

Data breaches and security threats are a top concern among IT leaders, yet it’s harder than ever to hire skilled security professionals. That has organizations looking for ways to more easily improve their security strategy. One option is to implement a software-defined WAN (SD-WAN).I recently talked with Hamza Seqqat, director of solutions architecture at Apcela, to get his take on how SD-WAN affects security strategy. Seqqat helps enterprise organizations redefine their wide-area networks to accommodate the growing use of cloud-based applications and services. In our discussion, he outlined four areas where SD-WAN offers new security benefits.To read this article in full, please click here

How SD-WAN can improve your security strategy

Data breaches and security threats are a top concern among IT leaders, yet it’s harder than ever to hire skilled security professionals. That has organizations looking for ways to more easily improve their security strategy. One option is to implement a software-defined WAN (SD-WAN).I recently talked with Hamza Seqqat, director of solutions architecture at Apcela, to get his take on how SD-WAN affects security strategy. Seqqat helps enterprise organizations redefine their wide-area networks to accommodate the growing use of cloud-based applications and services. In our discussion, he outlined four areas where SD-WAN offers new security benefits.To read this article in full, please click here

How SD-WAN can improve your security strategy

Data breaches and security threats are a top concern among IT leaders, yet it’s harder than ever to hire skilled security professionals. That has organizations looking for ways to more easily improve their security strategy. One option is to implement a software-defined WAN (SD-WAN).I recently talked with Hamza Seqqat, director of solutions architecture at Apcela, to get his take on how SD-WAN affects security strategy. Seqqat helps enterprise organizations redefine their wide-area networks to accommodate the growing use of cloud-based applications and services. In our discussion, he outlined four areas where SD-WAN offers new security benefits.To read this article in full, please click here

Oculeus anti-fraud offering protects against telecom system abuse

When most enterprise companies worry about having their systems hacked by attackers, the main concern is for the enterprise networks. Few companies consider that their phone systems may be vulnerable to hacking resulting in costly toll fraud. Nevertheless, the practice of hacking into corporate PBX systems and injecting fraudulent calls over the network is causing billions of dollars in damage worldwide every year.Enterprise companies use modern PBX (private branch exchange) systems to run their communications. A PBX switches calls between enterprise users on local lines while allowing all users to share a certain number of external phone lines. Modern PBX systems work on the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), which is a signaling protocol used for initiating, maintaining, and terminating real-time sessions that include voice, video, and messaging applications.To read this article in full, please click here

Oculeus anti-fraud offering protects against telecom system abuse

When most enterprise companies worry about having their systems hacked by attackers, the main concern is for the enterprise networks. Few companies consider that their phone systems may be vulnerable to hacking resulting in costly toll fraud. Nevertheless, the practice of hacking into corporate PBX systems and injecting fraudulent calls over the network is causing billions of dollars in damage worldwide every year.Enterprise companies use modern PBX (private branch exchange) systems to run their communications. A PBX switches calls between enterprise users on local lines while allowing all users to share a certain number of external phone lines. Modern PBX systems work on the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), which is a signaling protocol used for initiating, maintaining, and terminating real-time sessions that include voice, video, and messaging applications.To read this article in full, please click here

Netsurion eases networking and security challenges

The disciplines of networking, security and regulatory compliance are challenges for all organizations, but especially so for small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) for a variety of reasons.A primary challenge is in implementing technology solutions, most of which are point solutions that operate in silos. This leads to “swivel chair” operations where networking and security professionals have to consult multiple separate consoles to keep tabs on how well everything is performing and whether cyber threats are bringing risk to the business. The lack of integration of the siloed solutions can leave gaps in coverage and cause extra work for those in charge of the network.To read this article in full, please click here

Netsurion eases networking and security challenges

The disciplines of networking, security and regulatory compliance are challenges for all organizations, but especially so for small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) for a variety of reasons.A primary challenge is in implementing technology solutions, most of which are point solutions that operate in silos. This leads to “swivel chair” operations where networking and security professionals have to consult multiple separate consoles to keep tabs on how well everything is performing and whether cyber threats are bringing risk to the business. The lack of integration of the siloed solutions can leave gaps in coverage and cause extra work for those in charge of the network.To read this article in full, please click here

Itential puts organizations on the path to the modern network

In the realm of enterprise computing, we have already automated the management and orchestration of software-defined compute and storage resources. Need another server or more storage capacity? Those virtual resources can be created in mere minutes — and without intervention from a human to initiate or manage the process.Need changes to the network, such as a router reconfiguration? Well, that’s going to take a lot of time and effort from a range of humans. Even something as simple as an update to a DNS or IPAM server can take three to five days to complete. A port turn-up can take just as long — not because any physical action takes that much time, but because the workflow of all the human reviews and approvals takes time.To read this article in full, please click here

Itential puts organizations on the path to the modern network

In the realm of enterprise computing, we have already automated the management and orchestration of software-defined compute and storage resources. Need another server or more storage capacity? Those virtual resources can be created in mere minutes — and without intervention from a human to initiate or manage the process.Need changes to the network, such as a router reconfiguration? Well, that’s going to take a lot of time and effort from a range of humans. Even something as simple as an update to a DNS or IPAM server can take three to five days to complete. A port turn-up can take just as long — not because any physical action takes that much time, but because the workflow of all the human reviews and approvals takes time.To read this article in full, please click here

NetBeez performs active network monitoring from the user perspective

It’s a fairly common scenario. An end user calls the help desk about a problem he’s experiencing. He might say, “I can't access the inventory application.” The worker has no idea why he can't get to the application today when it worked fine yesterday. The help desk consultant collects the relevant information for the ticket, which then gets escalated to the network operations center that is the control center for the enterprise.The technician assigned to the ticket doesn't know if this is a true network problem, an application problem, or even something that is specific to that user's workstation or environment. Narrowing the possible causes of the problem will require some investigation using various toolsets. Traditional network monitoring tools can tell if there’s anything wrong with a server, router, or switch on that user’s network segment. If those major components are fine, the hunt for the root cause gets underway. This can be time consuming in the absence of user-specific metrics.To read this article in full, please click here

NetBeez performs active network monitoring from the user perspective

It’s a fairly common scenario. An end user calls the help desk about a problem he’s experiencing. He might say, “I can't access the inventory application.” The worker has no idea why he can't get to the application today when it worked fine yesterday. The help desk consultant collects the relevant information for the ticket, which then gets escalated to the network operations center that is the control center for the enterprise.The technician assigned to the ticket doesn't know if this is a true network problem, an application problem, or even something that is specific to that user's workstation or environment. Narrowing the possible causes of the problem will require some investigation using various toolsets. Traditional network monitoring tools can tell if there’s anything wrong with a server, router, or switch on that user’s network segment. If those major components are fine, the hunt for the root cause gets underway. This can be time consuming in the absence of user-specific metrics.To read this article in full, please click here

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