Linda Musthaler

Author Archives: Linda Musthaler

Itential puts organizations on the path to the modern network

In the realm of enterprise computing, we have already automated the management and orchestration of software-defined compute and storage resources. Need another server or more storage capacity? Those virtual resources can be created in mere minutes — and without intervention from a human to initiate or manage the process.Need changes to the network, such as a router reconfiguration? Well, that’s going to take a lot of time and effort from a range of humans. Even something as simple as an update to a DNS or IPAM server can take three to five days to complete. A port turn-up can take just as long — not because any physical action takes that much time, but because the workflow of all the human reviews and approvals takes time.To read this article in full, please click here

Itential puts organizations on the path to the modern network

In the realm of enterprise computing, we have already automated the management and orchestration of software-defined compute and storage resources. Need another server or more storage capacity? Those virtual resources can be created in mere minutes — and without intervention from a human to initiate or manage the process.Need changes to the network, such as a router reconfiguration? Well, that’s going to take a lot of time and effort from a range of humans. Even something as simple as an update to a DNS or IPAM server can take three to five days to complete. A port turn-up can take just as long — not because any physical action takes that much time, but because the workflow of all the human reviews and approvals takes time.To read this article in full, please click here

NetBeez performs active network monitoring from the user perspective

It’s a fairly common scenario. An end user calls the help desk about a problem he’s experiencing. He might say, “I can't access the inventory application.” The worker has no idea why he can't get to the application today when it worked fine yesterday. The help desk consultant collects the relevant information for the ticket, which then gets escalated to the network operations center that is the control center for the enterprise.The technician assigned to the ticket doesn't know if this is a true network problem, an application problem, or even something that is specific to that user's workstation or environment. Narrowing the possible causes of the problem will require some investigation using various toolsets. Traditional network monitoring tools can tell if there’s anything wrong with a server, router, or switch on that user’s network segment. If those major components are fine, the hunt for the root cause gets underway. This can be time consuming in the absence of user-specific metrics.To read this article in full, please click here

NetBeez performs active network monitoring from the user perspective

It’s a fairly common scenario. An end user calls the help desk about a problem he’s experiencing. He might say, “I can't access the inventory application.” The worker has no idea why he can't get to the application today when it worked fine yesterday. The help desk consultant collects the relevant information for the ticket, which then gets escalated to the network operations center that is the control center for the enterprise.The technician assigned to the ticket doesn't know if this is a true network problem, an application problem, or even something that is specific to that user's workstation or environment. Narrowing the possible causes of the problem will require some investigation using various toolsets. Traditional network monitoring tools can tell if there’s anything wrong with a server, router, or switch on that user’s network segment. If those major components are fine, the hunt for the root cause gets underway. This can be time consuming in the absence of user-specific metrics.To read this article in full, please click here

Apcela optimizes Office 365 performance, improving user productivity

More than 120 million Microsoft Office accounts have moved from on-premises to the cloud since the launch of Microsoft Office 365. Many of those accounts belong to users in large enterprises that weren’t fully prepared for the transition. The fact is as many as 30 to 40 percent of enterprises struggle with some level of application performance as they make the shift to cloud.Some of the signs of poor performance (and the source of users’ frustration) include Outlook responding slowly when the user tries to open messages, VoIP calls over Skype for Business having rough spots, and documents being slow to open, close and save in Word. Performance problems in the Office applications manifest in many other ways, as well.To read this article in full, please click here

Apcela optimizes Office 365 performance, improving user productivity

More than 120 million Microsoft Office accounts have moved from on-premises to the cloud since the launch of Microsoft Office 365. Many of those accounts belong to users in large enterprises that weren’t fully prepared for the transition. The fact is as many as 30 to 40 percent of enterprises struggle with some level of application performance as they make the shift to cloud.Some of the signs of poor performance (and the source of users’ frustration) include Outlook responding slowly when the user tries to open messages, VoIP calls over Skype for Business having rough spots, and documents being slow to open, close and save in Word. Performance problems in the Office applications manifest in many other ways, as well.To read this article in full, please click here

NS1’s Private DNS enables modern applications, DevOps and more

We all know and appreciate DNS as the domain name system that maps names like Networkworld.com to the IP address that a browser actually connects to in order to get content from a website. DNS is obviously a foundational piece of the internet. However, the technology is a bit stale and needs a refresh to keep up with the times.Legacy DNS is a simple protocol. It is essentially a phonebook that maps a domain name to an IP address. Most commercial DNS products or services in the market today are based on an open-source software product called BIND put out by the Internet Software Consortium. The name BIND stands for “Berkeley Internet Name Daemon” because the software originated in the early 1980s at the University of California at Berkeley. Not much about the DNS protocol has changed since then.To read this article in full, please click here

NS1’s Private DNS enables modern applications, DevOps and more

We all know and appreciate DNS as the domain name system that maps names like Networkworld.com to the IP address that a browser actually connects to in order to get content from a website. DNS is obviously a foundational piece of the internet. However, the technology is a bit stale and needs a refresh to keep up with the times.Legacy DNS is a simple protocol. It is essentially a phonebook that maps a domain name to an IP address. Most commercial DNS products or services in the market today are based on an open-source software product called BIND put out by the Internet Software Consortium. The name BIND stands for “Berkeley Internet Name Daemon” because the software originated in the early 1980s at the University of California at Berkeley. Not much about the DNS protocol has changed since then.To read this article in full, please click here

OPAQ enables total network security from the cloud

Today’s threat landscape has led organizations to defend their networks with numerous point solutions, most of which are complex and require significant attention to operations and ongoing maintenance. While large enterprises often have sufficient skilled resources to support the security infrastructure, small- to medium-sized businesses sometimes struggle in this area.For the SMB market in particular, Network Security-as-a-Service is an attractive offering. It allows companies to get the very best security technology at an affordable price point while having someone else maintain the complex infrastructure.This has given rise to a genre of service provider that builds its own network backbone in the cloud and embeds network security as an integral service. More and more players are starting to offer this kind of service. They generally start with a global network backbone and software-defined wide-area networking (SD-WAN), add a full security stack, and connect to various cloud services from Amazon, Google, Microsoft, etc. Customers connect their data centers, branches, end users, and cloud apps to this network, and away they go. It’s networking, plus network security, all in one place, and all managed as a service.To read this article in full, please click here

OPAQ enables total network security from the cloud

Today’s threat landscape has led organizations to defend their networks with numerous point solutions, most of which are complex and require significant attention to operations and ongoing maintenance. While large enterprises often have sufficient skilled resources to support the security infrastructure, small- to medium-sized businesses sometimes struggle in this area.For the SMB market in particular, Network Security-as-a-Service is an attractive offering. It allows companies to get the very best security technology at an affordable price point while having someone else maintain the complex infrastructure.This has given rise to a genre of service provider that builds its own network backbone in the cloud and embeds network security as an integral service. More and more players are starting to offer this kind of service. They generally start with a global network backbone and software-defined wide-area networking (SD-WAN), add a full security stack, and connect to various cloud services from Amazon, Google, Microsoft, etc. Customers connect their data centers, branches, end users, and cloud apps to this network, and away they go. It’s networking, plus network security, all in one place, and all managed as a service.To read this article in full, please click here

Pulse Secure VPN enhanced to better support hybrid IT environments

The workplace is changing rapidly as employees embrace mobility, applications are in the cloud, and Internet of Things (IoT) devices are instrumented for continuous connectivity — and this is affecting how organizations must think about secure access. Regardless of the scenario, organizations want solutions that deliver better productivity for whomever (or whatever) is connecting, a consistent user experience, compliance with corporate policies and regulatory requirements, and strong end-to-end security.This is the playing field for Pulse Secure, a company that has built a broad portfolio of access products and services that are available as a unified platform. Pulse Secure has considered practically every use case and has built a range of solutions to solve the secure connectivity challenges that IT organizations face. The company claims to have more than 20,000 customers and a presence in 80 percent of global enterprises — maybe even yours.To read this article in full, please click here

Pulse Secure VPN enhanced to better support hybrid IT environments

The workplace is changing rapidly as employees embrace mobility, applications are in the cloud, and Internet of Things (IoT) devices are instrumented for continuous connectivity — and this is affecting how organizations must think about secure access. Regardless of the scenario, organizations want solutions that deliver better productivity for whomever (or whatever) is connecting, a consistent user experience, compliance with corporate policies and regulatory requirements, and strong end-to-end security.This is the playing field for Pulse Secure, a company that has built a broad portfolio of access products and services that are available as a unified platform. Pulse Secure has considered practically every use case and has built a range of solutions to solve the secure connectivity challenges that IT organizations face. The company claims to have more than 20,000 customers and a presence in 80 percent of global enterprises — maybe even yours.To read this article in full, please click here

Pulse Secure VPN enhanced to better support hybrid IT environments

The workplace is changing rapidly as employees embrace mobility, applications are in the cloud, and Internet of Things (IoT) devices are instrumented for continuous connectivity — and this is affecting how organizations must think about secure access. Regardless of the scenario, organizations want solutions that deliver better productivity for whomever (or whatever) is connecting, a consistent user experience, compliance with corporate policies and regulatory requirements, and strong end-to-end security.This is the playing field for Pulse Secure, a company that has built a broad portfolio of access products and services that are available as a unified platform. Pulse Secure has considered practically every use case and has built a range of solutions to solve the secure connectivity challenges that IT organizations face. The company claims to have more than 20,000 customers and a presence in 80 percent of global enterprises — maybe even yours.To read this article in full, please click here

Nexthink’s digital experience management platform quickly solves performance problems

Any organization that has even a modest level of IT infrastructure does IT service monitoring (ITSM) to ensure that everything is operating within performance mandates codified in service level agreements (SLAs). If the IT organization is meeting its SLAs, it’s assumed that the experience the employee has interacting with this infrastructure is good. But that isn’t always the case, and the IT group might not even be aware.For instance, an enterprise application might be working just fine for most users, but for one or a few users in particular, it could be especially slow. Unless those people call the help desk to complain, who would ever know that they are suffering? Sometimes people just accept that some aspect of IT functions poorly, and they carry on the best they can, even if it affects their productivity.To read this article in full, please click here

Teridion enables higher performing and more responsive SaaS applications

Up until the advent of Software as a Service (SaaS), almost every business-critical application ran inside an enterprise’s own data center. The company had complete control over the performance of the application and could use technologies such as MPLS and techniques like WAN optimization to ensure that users across the enterprise always had a good experience with the application.That’s no longer the case now that SaaS has become the de facto delivery model for core business applications today. In effect, the cloud is the new data center, and the internet is the new LAN. The most business-critical network between the end user and the application is not the corporate LAN but the public internet, which itself is a big collection of networks. When the internet is what sits between the end user and the SaaS application, the company depending on that application may no longer have good performance, reliability, and control.To read this article in full, please click here

Cato Networks adds threat hunting to its Network as a Service

Enterprises that have grown comfortable with Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (IaaS) are increasingly accepting of Network as a Service (NaaS). NaaS is a rapidly growing market. According to Market Research Future, NaaS is expected to become a US $126 billion market by 2022, sustaining an annual growth rate of 28.4 percent.One of the key benefits of cloud-based networking is increased security for applications and data. Given that the traditional perimeter of on-premise networks has been decimated by mobile and cloud computing, NaaS builds a new perimeter in the cloud. Now it’s possible to unify all traffic – from data centers, branch locations, mobile users, and cloud platforms – in the cloud. This means an enterprise can set all its security policies in one place, and it can push traffic through cloud-based security functions such as next-generation firewall, secure web gateway, advanced threat protection, and so on.To read this article in full, please click here

Cato Networks adds threat hunting to its Network as a Service

Enterprises that have grown comfortable with Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (IaaS) are increasingly accepting of Network as a Service (NaaS). NaaS is a rapidly growing market. According to Market Research Future, NaaS is expected to become a US $126 billion market by 2022, sustaining an annual growth rate of 28.4 percent.One of the key benefits of cloud-based networking is increased security for applications and data. Given that the traditional perimeter of on-premise networks has been decimated by mobile and cloud computing, NaaS builds a new perimeter in the cloud. Now it’s possible to unify all traffic – from data centers, branch locations, mobile users, and cloud platforms – in the cloud. This means an enterprise can set all its security policies in one place, and it can push traffic through cloud-based security functions such as next-generation firewall, secure web gateway, advanced threat protection, and so on.To read this article in full, please click here

Asigra evolves backup/recovery to address security, compliance needs

As backup and recovery products and solutions evolve, they are beginning to intersect with security and compliance. Online backup and recovery software company Asigra has announced a new version of its software that addresses the risks posed by ransomware and non-compliance with Article 17 of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Both should be a concern for organizations of all sizes, from global enterprises on down to small/medium businesses.Let’s take a look at the new capabilities that Asigra is bringing to market with the version 14 release of its Cloud Backup software, and why these capabilities are an important evolution in backup and recovery.To read this article in full, please click here

Asigra evolves backup/recovery to address security, compliance needs

As backup and recovery products and solutions evolve, they are beginning to intersect with security and compliance. Online backup and recovery software company Asigra has announced a new version of its software that addresses the risks posed by ransomware and non-compliance with Article 17 of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Both should be a concern for organizations of all sizes, from global enterprises on down to small/medium businesses.Let’s take a look at the new capabilities that Asigra is bringing to market with the version 14 release of its Cloud Backup software, and why these capabilities are an important evolution in backup and recovery.To read this article in full, please click here

VMware and VeloCloud announce their networking and security strategy

It’s been a few months since VMware closed its acquisition of VeloCloud, a prominent SD-WAN provider. In that time, the two companies have worked to integrate their products, and recently they announced a unified strategy called the Virtual Cloud Network.The strategy fully supports the migration of applications and data out of the enterprise data center to the cloud and to branches — and with IoT, pretty much anything can be considered a branch today, as VeloCloud claims to have a customer with ocean-going ships as branches. The result is that many enterprises are in a position where their applications are everywhere, and their data is everywhere. This has profound implications on the network that needs to support all of this.To read this article in full, please click here

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