Patrick Nelson

Author Archives: Patrick Nelson

Public internet should be all software-defined

The public internet should migrate to a programmable backbone-as-a-service architecture, says a team of network engineers behind NOIA, a startup promising to revolutionize global traffic. They say the internet will be more efficient if internet protocols and routing technologies are re-worked and then combined with a traffic-trading blockchain.It’s “impossible to use internet for modern applications,” the company says on its website. “Almost all global internet companies struggle to ensure uptime and reliable user experience.”That’s because modern techniques aren’t being introduced fully, NOIA says. The engineers say algorithms should be implemented to route traffic and that segment routing technology should be adopted. Plus, blockchain should be instigated to trade internet transit capacity. A “programmable internet solves the web’s inefficiencies,” a representative from NOIA told me.To read this article in full, please click here

Smarter IoT concepts reveal creaking networks

The internet of things (IoT) needs its own infrastructure ecosystem — one that doesn't use external clouds at all, researchers at the University of Magdeburg say.The computer scientists recently obtained funding from the German government to study how to build a future-generation of revolutionary, emergent IoT systems. They say networks must be fault tolerant, secure, and traverse disparate protocols, which they aren't now.[ Read also: What is edge computing? and How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers ] The researchers say a smarter, unique, and organic infrastructure needs to be developed for the IoT and that simply adapting the IoT to traditional networks won't work. They say services must self-organize and function autonomously and that people must accept the fact that we are using the internet in ways never originally intended. To read this article in full, please click here

An eco-friendly internet of disposable things is coming

Get ready for a future of disposable of internet of things (IoT) devices, one that will mean everything is connected to networks. It will be particularly useful in logistics, being used in single-use plastics in retail packaging and throw-away shippers’ carboard boxes.How it will happen? The answer is when non-hazardous, disposable bio-batteries make it possible. And that moment might be approaching. Researchers say they’re closer to commercializing a bacteria-powered miniature battery that they say will propel the IoDT.[ Learn more: Download a PDF bundle of five essential articles about IoT in the enterprise ] The “internet of disposable things is a new paradigm for the rapid evolution of wireless sensor networks,” says Seokheun Choi, an associate professor at Binghamton University, in an article on the school’s website.To read this article in full, please click here

SoftBank plans drone-delivered IoT and internet by 2023

A Japanese telecommunications giant and a California-based drone builder intend to start a drone-delivered internet service by 2023. The two companies, Softbank and AeroVironment, say they’ve assembled the first one already, according to materials (pdf) on SoftBank’s website in April.The HAWK30 drone has a wingspan of 260 feet and is powered by solar panels mounted on the wings that drive 10 electric motors. The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) will fly in the stratosphere at 65,000 feet above sea level (12 miles), AeroVironment says in a press release. That’s around twice the altitude that many passenger planes fly at.To read this article in full, please click here

Disposable $100 IoT satellites could swarm Earth’s orbit

Tiny cheap satellites, self-organizing and communicating as a group, could shift the internet of things (IoT) to space. The postage-stamp-sized devices, acting as sensors, just like the ones we see in traditional IoT networks could perform tasks such as mapping or studying Earth, say scientists involved in a recent successful launch of the disposable nanosatellites.The test satellites, essentially just sensors, were deployed in a batch in March. They captured data, communicated with one another, and then after a couple of days in orbit, as was planned, burned up as they reentered the atmosphere.[ IoT in the enterprise: Download a PDF bundle of five essential articles about IoT in the enterprise ] “This is like the PC revolution for space,” says Zac Manchester, an assistant professor at Stanford University, in an article on the school’s website. Manchester invented the ChipSats 10 years ago. It has taken until now, and after a failed attempt in 2014, to get the constellation operational—if just for those few days.To read this article in full, please click here

Data centers should sell spare UPS capacity to the grid

The energy storage capacity in uninterruptable power supply (UPS) batteries, languishing often dormant in data centers, could provide new revenue streams for those data centers, says Eaton, a major electrical power management company.Excess, grid-generated power, created during times of low demand, should be stored on the now-proliferating lithium-backup power systems strewn worldwide in data centers, Eaton says. Then, using an algorithm tied to grid-demand, electricity should be withdrawn as necessary for grid use. It would then be slid back onto the backup batteries when not needed.[ Read also: How server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency | Get regularly scheduled insights: Sign up for Network World newsletters ] The concept is called Distributed Energy and has been gaining traction in part because electrical generation is changing—emerging green power, such as wind and solar, being used now at the grid-level have considerations that differ from the now-retiring, fossil-fuel power generation. You can generate solar only in daylight, yet much demand takes place on dark evenings, for example.To read this article in full, please click here

Data centers should sell spare UPS capacity to the grid

The energy storage capacity in uninterruptable power supply (UPS) batteries, languishing often dormant in data centers, could provide new revenue streams for those data centers, says Eaton, a major electrical power management company.Excess, grid-generated power, created during times of low demand, should be stored on the now-proliferating lithium-backup power systems strewn worldwide in data centers, Eaton says. Then, using an algorithm tied to grid-demand, electricity should be withdrawn as necessary for grid use. It would then be slid back onto the backup batteries when not needed.[ Read also: How server disaggregation can boost data center efficiency | Get regularly scheduled insights: Sign up for Network World newsletters ] The concept is called Distributed Energy and has been gaining traction in part because electrical generation is changing—emerging green power, such as wind and solar, being used now at the grid-level have considerations that differ from the now-retiring, fossil-fuel power generation. You can generate solar only in daylight, yet much demand takes place on dark evenings, for example.To read this article in full, please click here

Self-learning sensor chips won’t need networks

Tiny, intelligent microelectronics should be used to perform as much sensor processing as possible on-chip rather than wasting resources by sending often un-needed, duplicated raw data to the cloud or computers. So say scientists behind new, machine-learning networks that aim to embed everything needed for artificial intelligence (AI) onto a processor.“This opens the door for many new applications, starting from real-time evaluation of sensor data,” says Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems on its website. No delays sending unnecessary data onwards, along with speedy processing, means theoretically there is zero latency.To read this article in full, please click here

Self-learning sensor chips won’t need networks

Tiny, intelligent microelectronics should be used to perform as much sensor processing as possible on-chip rather than wasting resources by sending often un-needed, duplicated raw data to the cloud or computers. So say scientists behind new, machine-learning networks that aim to embed everything needed for artificial intelligence (AI) onto a processor.“This opens the door for many new applications, starting from real-time evaluation of sensor data,” says Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems on its website. No delays sending unnecessary data onwards, along with speedy processing, means theoretically there is zero latency.To read this article in full, please click here

Satellite-based internet possible by year-end, says SpaceX

With SpaceX’s successful launch of an initial array of broadband-internet-carrying satellites last week, and Amazon’s surprising posting of numerous satellite engineering-related job openings on its job board this month, one might well be asking if the next-generation internet space race is finally getting going. (I first wrote about OneWeb’s  satellite internet plans it was concocting with Airbus four years ago.)This new batch of satellite-driven internet systems, if they work and are eventually switched on, could provide broadband to most places, including previously internet-barren locations, such as rural areas. That would be good for high-bandwidth, low-latency remote-internet of things (IoT) and increasingly important edge-server connections for verticals like oil and gas and maritime. Data could even end up getting stored in compliance-friendly outer space, too. Leaky ground-based connections, also, perhaps a thing of the past.To read this article in full, please click here

Space internet maybe end of year, says SpaceX

With SpaceX’s successful launch of an initial tranche of proposed broadband-internet-carrying satellites last week, and Amazon’s surprising posting of numerous satellite engineering-related job openings on its job board this month, one might well be asking if the next-generation internet space race is finally getting going — I first wrote about OneWeb’s  satellite internet plans it was concocting with Airbus four years ago.To read this article in full, please click here

Edge-based caching and blockchain-nodes speed up data transmission

The combination of a blockchain-like distributed network, along with the ability to locate data at the edge will massively speed up future networks, such as those used by the internet of things (IoT), claims Bluzelle in announcing what is says is the first decentralized data delivery network (DDN).Distributed DDNs will be like content delivery networks (CDNs) that now cache content around the world to speed up the web, but in this case, it will be for data, the Singapore-based company explains. Distributed key-value (blockchain) networks and edge computing built into Bluzelle's system will provide significantly faster delivery than existing caching, the company claims in a press release announcing its product.To read this article in full, please click here

Will 5G be the first carbon-neutral network?

If wireless networks transfer 1,000 times more data, does that mean they will use 1,000 times more energy? It probably would with the old 4G LTE wireless technologies— LTE doesn’t have much of a sleep-standby. But with 5G, we might have a more energy-efficient option.More customers want Earth-friendly options, and engineers are now working on how to achieve it — meaning 5G might introduce the first zero-carbon networks. It’s not all certain, though.[ Related: What is 5G wireless? And how it will change networking as we know it ] “When the 4G technology for wireless communication was developed, not many people thought about how much energy is consumed in transmitting bits of information,” says Emil Björnson, associate professor of communication systems at Linkoping University, in an article on the school’s website.To read this article in full, please click here

The first step toward ultra-high-speed Wi-Fi: a laser-radio transmitter

Leaping toward the next generation of wireless-based data communications, researchers say they are making progress extracting and sending data using semiconductor lasers that churn out radio signals across multiple frequencies all at the same time. Data could conceivably be transmitted hundreds of time faster than today’s traditional Radio Frequency (RF) wireless, engineers believe.It’s the “first laser-radio transmitter,” Harvard University proclaims of its invention in an article on its John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) website.To read this article in full, please click here

Revolutionary data compression technique could slash compute costs

There’s a major problem with today’s money-saving memory compression used for storing more data in less space. The issue is that computers store and run memory in predetermined blocks, yet many modern programs function and play out in variable chunks.The way it’s currently done is actually, highly inefficient. That’s because the compressed programs, which use objects rather than evenly configured slabs of data, don’t match the space used to store and run them, explain scientists working on a revolutionary new compression system called Zippads.The answer, they say—and something that if it works would drastically reduce those inefficiencies, speed things up, and importantly, reduce compute costs—is to compress the varied objects and not the cache lines, as is the case now. Cache lines are fixed-size blocks of memory that are transferred to memory cache.To read this article in full, please click here

Revolutionary data compression technique could slash compute costs

There’s a major problem with today’s money-saving memory compression used for storing more data in less space. The issue is that computers store and run memory in predetermined blocks, yet many modern programs function and play out in variable chunks.The way it’s currently done is actually, highly inefficient. That’s because the compressed programs, which use objects rather than evenly configured slabs of data, don’t match the space used to store and run them, explain scientists working on a revolutionary new compression system called Zippads.The answer, they say—and something that if it works would drastically reduce those inefficiencies, speed things up, and importantly, reduce compute costs—is to compress the varied objects and not the cache lines, as is the case now. Cache lines are fixed-size blocks of memory that are transferred to memory cache.To read this article in full, please click here

How data storage will shift to blockchain

If you thought cloud storage was digging in its heels to become the go-to method for storing data, and at the same time grabbing share from own-server, in-house storage, you may be interested to hear that some think both are on the way out. Instead organizations will use blockchain-based storage.Decentralized blockchain-based file storage will be more secure, will make it harder to lose data, and will be cheaper than anything seen before, say organizations actively promoting the slant on encrypted, distributed technology.[ Read also: Why blockchain (might be) coming to an IoT implementation near you ] Storing transactional data in a blockchain China company FileStorm, which describes itself in marketing materials as the first Interplanetary File Storage (IPFS) platform on blockchain, says the key to making it all work is to only store the transactional data in blockchain. The actual data files, such as large video files, are distributed in IPFS.To read this article in full, please click here

How data storage will shift to blockchain

If you thought cloud storage was digging in its heels to become the go-to method for storing data, and at the same time grabbing share from own-server, in-house storage, you may be interested to hear that some think both are on the way out. Instead organizations will use blockchain-based storage.Decentralized blockchain-based file storage will be more secure, will make it harder to lose data, and will be cheaper than anything seen before, say organizations actively promoting the slant on encrypted, distributed technology.[ Read also: Why blockchain (might be) coming to an IoT implementation near you ] Storing transactional data in a blockchain China company FileStorm, which describes itself in marketing materials as the first Interplanetary File Storage (IPFS) platform on blockchain, says the key to making it all work is to only store the transactional data in blockchain. The actual data files, such as large video files, are distributed in IPFS.To read this article in full, please click here

‘Fiber-in-air’ 5G network research gets funding

Wireless transmission at data rates of around 45gbps could one day be commonplace, some engineers say. “Fiber-in-air” is how the latest variant of 5G infrastructure is being described. To get there, a Britain-funded consortium of chip makers, universities, and others intend to aggressively investigate the exploitation of D-Band. That part of the radio spectrum is at 151-174.8 GHz in millimeter wavelengths (mm-wave) and hasn’t been used before.The researchers intend to do it by riffing on a now roughly 70-year-old gun-like electron-sending device that can trace its roots back through the annals of radio history: The Traveling Wave Tube, or TWT, an electron gun-magnet-combo that was used in the development of television and still brings space images back to Earth.To read this article in full, please click here

Extreme 5G network research gets funding

Wireless transmission at data rates of around 45 gigabits per second could one day be commonplace, some engineers say. “Fiber-in-air” is how the latest variant of 5G infrastructure is being described. To get there, a Britain-funded consortium of chip makers, universities, and others intend to aggressively investigate the exploitation of D-Band. That part of the radio spectrum is at 151-174.8 GHz in millimeter wavelengths (mm-wave) and hasn’t been used before.The researchers intend to do it by riffing on a now roughly 70-year-old gun-like electron-sending device that can trace its roots back through the annals of radio history: The Traveling Wave Tube, or TWT, an electron gun-magnet-combo that was used in the development of television and still brings space images back to Earth.To read this article in full, please click here

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