Patrick Nelson

Author Archives: Patrick Nelson

Private 5G networks are coming

The Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) will drive adoption of private 5G networks, some are saying.In fact, automakers BMW; Daimler, which makes Mercedes vehicles; and Volkswagen have told the German spectrum manager BNA (Federal Network Agency) that they are “interested in operating local 5G networks,” Markus Fasse and Stephan Scheuer wrote in a recent Handelsblatt Global article.[ Read also: How enterprises can prep for 5G | Get regularly scheduled insights: Sign up for Network World newsletters ] Separately, network equipment vendor Qualcomm says it’s working on 5G NR technologies for private, industrial IoT networks.To read this article in full, please click here

Private 5G networks are coming

The Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) will drive adoption of private 5G networks, some are saying.In fact, automakers BMW; Daimler, which makes Mercedes vehicles; and Volkswagen have told the German spectrum manager BNA (Federal Network Agency) that they are “interested in operating local 5G networks,” Markus Fasse and Stephan Scheuer wrote in a recent Handelsblatt Global article.[ Read also: How enterprises can prep for 5G | Get regularly scheduled insights: Sign up for Network World newsletters ] Separately, network equipment vendor Qualcomm says it’s working on 5G NR technologies for private, industrial IoT networks.To read this article in full, please click here

Optical networking breakthrough will run networks 100x faster

Researchers reckon they could speed up the internet a hundredfold with a new technique that twists light beams within fiber optic cable rather than sending them in a straight path.“What we’ve managed to do is accurately transmit data via light at its highest capacity in a way that will allow us to massively increase our bandwidth,” Dr. Haoran Ren, of Australia’s RMIT University, said in a press release.[ Learn who's developing quantum computers. ] The corkscrewing configuration, in development over the last few years and now recently physically miniaturized, uses a technique called orbital angular momentum (OAM).To read this article in full, please click here

Optical networking breakthrough will run networks 100x faster

Researchers reckon they could speed up the internet a hundredfold with a new technique that twists light beams within fiber optic cable rather than sending them in a straight path.“What we’ve managed to do is accurately transmit data via light at its highest capacity in a way that will allow us to massively increase our bandwidth,” Dr. Haoran Ren, of Australia’s RMIT University, said in a press release.[ Learn who's developing quantum computers. ] The corkscrewing configuration, in development over the last few years and now recently physically miniaturized, uses a technique called orbital angular momentum (OAM).To read this article in full, please click here

Optical networking breakthrough will run networks 100x faster

Researchers reckon they could speed up the internet a hundredfold with a new technique that twists light beams within fiber optic cable rather than sending them in a straight path.“What we’ve managed to do is accurately transmit data via light at its highest capacity in a way that will allow us to massively increase our bandwidth,” Dr. Haoran Ren, of Australia’s RMIT University, said in a press release.[ Learn who's developing quantum computers. ] The corkscrewing configuration, in development over the last few years and now recently physically miniaturized, uses a technique called orbital angular momentum (OAM).To read this article in full, please click here

Fiber breakthrough will run networks 100x faster

A kind of twisting of light beams, within a fiber optic cable, rather than the sending of them linearly will let computer systems, and the internet overall, run faster, according to researchers who have just announced new findings. The group reckon they could speed up the internet a hundred-fold using the twisted technique.“What we’ve managed to do is accurately transmit data via light at its highest capacity in a way that will allow us to massively increase our bandwidth,” Dr. Haoran Ren, of Australia’s RMIT University, said in a press release.To read this article in full, please click here

Fiber breakthrough will run networks 100x faster

A kind of twisting of light beams, within a fiber optic cable, rather than the sending of them linearly will let computer systems, and the internet overall, run faster, according to researchers who have just announced new findings. The group reckon they could speed up the internet a hundred-fold using the twisted technique.“What we’ve managed to do is accurately transmit data via light at its highest capacity in a way that will allow us to massively increase our bandwidth,” Dr. Haoran Ren, of Australia’s RMIT University, said in a press release.To read this article in full, please click here

5G and 6G wireless technologies have security issues

Network security concerns remain an issue with the upcoming 5G and 6G wireless network standards.That's because security measures being aren't being adopted in new 5G standards, and there's a newly discovered potential for Man-in-the-Middle attacks in terahertz-based 6G networks, multiple research studies have discovered.One of those studies — a formal analysis of 5G authentication conducted by scientists from ETH Zurich, the University of Lorraine/INRIA, and the University of Dundee — found that criminals will be able intercept 5G communications and steal data because “critical security gaps are present,” the group says in their press release. That’s in part because “security goals are underspecified” and there’s a “lack of precision” in the 3GPP standards, they say.To read this article in full, please click here

Wave energy to power undersea data centers

Offshore, underwater data centers are going to be powered using wave motion, says a sustainable energy developer. And it's going to happen soon.Commercial wave energy company Ocean Energy says it’s almost completed a marine hydrokinetic wave generator build and that the 1.25 Megawatt power-production capacity vessel will be ready to deploy in 2019.The 125-feet-long wave converter OE Buoy will provide enough electricity for a subsea data center platform, the company claims.“Technology companies will be able to benefit from wave power [in] marine-based data storage and processing centers,” Ocean Energy CEO John McCarthy said in a press release earlier this month. “OE Buoy presents them with the potential double-benefit of ocean cooling and ocean energy in the one device.”To read this article in full, please click here

Wave energy to power undersea data centers

Offshore, underwater data centers are going to be powered using wave motion, says a sustainable energy developer. And it's going to happen soon.Commercial wave energy company Ocean Energy says it’s almost completed a marine hydrokinetic wave generator build and that the 1.25 Megawatt power-production capacity vessel will be ready to deploy in 2019.The 125-feet-long wave converter OE Buoy will provide enough electricity for a subsea data center platform, the company claims.“Technology companies will be able to benefit from wave power [in] marine-based data storage and processing centers,” Ocean Energy CEO John McCarthy said in a press release earlier this month. “OE Buoy presents them with the potential double-benefit of ocean cooling and ocean energy in the one device.”To read this article in full, please click here

Radical shake-up proposed for the internet

Changes may be in the cards for the internet. Primarily, the global information system that we know as the World Wide Web could be up for some radical blockchain-concept re-thinking. It could take us back in time, but in a good way, according to some experts.Mass decentralization, which includes the shifting the control of data from corporations to individuals, is what they propose.“If you think of our existing web, it was originally designed to be decentralized, but over the years, we've come to see 90 percent of the traffic going through three or four different companies,” says Mitra Ardron, Technical Lead for Decentralization, at Internet Archive, which hosted the Decentralized Web Summit in San Francisco this summer. He was quoted on the conference’s website.To read this article in full, please click here

Spray-on antennas will revolutionize the Internet of Things

In what could be a giant leap for Internet of Things (IoT) form factors, scientists say they have invented a spray-on antenna. And the bug-spray-like application will outperform traditional metal antennas, they claim.If it indeed does outperform traditional antennas, the clear, ink-like radiators will transform physical mediums used in constructing networks. Flexible substrates, windows, or data center walls even could be made into antennas, which would then drastically alter the data-collecting landscape.“Installing an antenna [could be] as easy as applying some bug spray,” an article on Drexel University’s website says.To read this article in full, please click here

Spray-on antennas will revolutionize the Internet of Things

In what could be a giant leap for Internet of Things (IoT) form factors, scientists say they have invented a spray-on antenna. And the bug-spray-like application will outperform traditional metal antennas, they claim.If it indeed does outperform traditional antennas, the clear, ink-like radiators will transform physical mediums used in constructing networks. Flexible substrates, windows, or data center walls even could be made into antennas, which would then drastically alter the data-collecting landscape.“Installing an antenna [could be] as easy as applying some bug spray,” an article on Drexel University’s website says.To read this article in full, please click here

Industrial IoT faces big challenges

Future cellular Internet of Things (IoT) networks are going to be expected to deliver much lower latency and significantly higher reliability. Getting to that point, however, must be a step-by-step approach, said a telco equipment executive at Mobile World Congress Americas earlier this month.“Doing one at a time is not so difficult, but doing both at the same time is a challenge,” said Jawad Manssour, head of Networks Portfolio Management at Product Area Networks with equipment maker Ericsson, during a presentation at the conference.Ericsson is one of the world’s big three principal base station and cellular equipment vendors, along with Huawei and Nokia. Mobile network providers Sprint and Ericsson recently announced that they are building a distributed virtualized core IoT network and an IoT operating system.To read this article in full, please click here

Industrial IoT faces big challenges

Future cellular Internet of Things (IoT) networks are going to be expected to deliver much lower latency and significantly higher reliability. Getting to that point, however, must be a step-by-step approach, said a telco equipment executive at Mobile World Congress Americas earlier this month.“Doing one at a time is not so difficult, but doing both at the same time is a challenge,” said Jawad Manssour, head of Networks Portfolio Management at Product Area Networks with equipment maker Ericsson, during a presentation at the conference.Ericsson is one of the world’s big three principal base station and cellular equipment vendors, along with Huawei and Nokia. Mobile network providers Sprint and Ericsson recently announced that they are building a distributed virtualized core IoT network and an IoT operating system.To read this article in full, please click here

Hybrid IoT communications could be the best option

Using a sole communications technology doesn’t make sense in many Internet of Things (IoT) implementations, says connectivity vendor Sigfox.In fact, the company, which provides Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) networks, says one could use a hybrid that includes an unlicensed LPWA network along with a licensed, cellular LTE narrowband IoT (NB-IoT) or LTE Cat M1 network solution instead. That way you can support cheap, unlicensed IoT short messaging close up, as is offered by Sigfox and others, and then offload the sensor traffic to more expensive, licensed LTE cellular mobile networks as the devices move off home base, such as what happens in asset tracking, Sigfox says.To read this article in full, please click here

Hybrid IoT communications could be the best option

Using a sole communications technology doesn’t make sense in many Internet of Things (IoT) implementations, says connectivity vendor Sigfox.In fact, the company, which provides Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) networks, says one could use a hybrid that includes an unlicensed LPWA network along with a licensed, cellular LTE narrowband IoT (NB-IoT) or LTE Cat M1 network solution instead. That way you can support cheap, unlicensed IoT short messaging close up, as is offered by Sigfox and others, and then offload the sensor traffic to more expensive, licensed LTE cellular mobile networks as the devices move off home base, such as what happens in asset tracking, Sigfox says.To read this article in full, please click here

6G will achieve terabits-per-second speeds

The first of the upcoming 5G network technologies won’t provide significant reliability gains over existing wireless, such as 4G LTE, according to a developer involved in 5G.Additionally, the millisecond levels of latency that the new 5G wireless will attempt to offer—when some of it is commercially launched, possibly later this year—isn’t going to be enough of an advantage for a society that’s now completely data-driven and needs near-instant, microsecond connectivity.“Ultra-reliability will be basically not there,” Ari Pouttu, professor for Dependable Wireless at the University of Oulu, told me during a visit to the university in Finland. 5G’s principal benefits over current wireless platforms are touted as latency reduction and improved reliability by marketers who are pitching the still-to-be-released technology.To read this article in full, please click here

6G will achieve terabits-per-second speeds

The first of the upcoming 5G network technologies won’t provide significant reliability gains over existing wireless, such as 4G LTE, according to a developer involved in 5G.Additionally, the millisecond levels of latency that the new 5G wireless will attempt to offer—when some of it is commercially launched, possibly later this year—isn’t going to be enough of an advantage for a society that’s now completely data-driven and needs near-instant, microsecond connectivity.“Ultra-reliability will be basically not there,” Ari Pouttu, professor for Dependable Wireless at the University of Oulu, told me during a visit to the university in Finland. 5G’s principal benefits over current wireless platforms are touted as latency reduction and improved reliability by marketers who are pitching the still-to-be-released technology.To read this article in full, please click here

Low-heat radios could replace cable links in data centers

Future 5G-based wireless networking equipment and data center equipment will combine antennas and the corresponding radio guts into one microprocessor unit, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology say.Integrating all of the wireless elements that one needs in a radio will reduce waste heat and allow better modulation, according to the group, which has been working on a one-chip, multiple transmitter and receiver package design. Longer transmission times and better data rates will result, they say.“Within the same channel bandwidth, the proposed transmitter can transmit six- to ten-times higher data rate,” says Hua Wang, an assistant professor in Georgia Tech's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in a news article on the university’s website about the idea.To read this article in full, please click here

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