Live stream to multiple platforms with Stream Connect

Live stream to multiple platforms with Stream Connect
Live stream to multiple platforms with Stream Connect

Today, we are announcing the Stream Connect beta, the first step towards supporting end-to-end live broadcasting on Cloudflare. You can use Stream Connect to push RTMPS feeds to the Cloudflare edge and have it restreamed to your audience on any platform that supports RTMPS such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitch.

What is restreaming?

Facebook, YouTube and Twitch are great platforms for creators to broadcast live video to reach billions. They each have their own unique communities and benefits for creators. If you have a band and want to broadcast a live performance for your fans, broadcasting to only one platform limits your reach. Restreaming enables you to push the live video to multiple platforms at the same time so you can meet your fans on their preferred platform.

Live video platforms accept incoming connections using a protocol called RTMP or RTMPS. Stream Connect allows you to continue using the same protocol as before. However, instead of using your local connection to send the video feed to multiple platforms, you only send it to Stream Connect. Connect uses the Cloudflare network to send your live feed to the configured media platforms.

How Stream Connect increases reliability and lowers latency

Live stream to multiple platforms with Stream Connect

Eliminating the Continue reading

Cloudflare Pages is now Generally Available

Cloudflare Pages is now Generally Available
Cloudflare Pages is now Generally Available

In December, we announced the beta of Cloudflare Pages: a fast, secure, and free way for frontend developers to build, host, and collaborate on Jamstack sites.

It’s been incredible to see what happens when you put a powerful tool in developers’ hands. In just a few months of beta, thousands of developers have deployed over ten thousand projects, reaching millions of people around the world.

Today, we’re excited to announce that Cloudflare Pages is now available for anyone and ready for your production needs. We’re also excited to show off some of the new features we’ve been working on over the course of the beta, including: web analytics, built in redirects, protected previews, live previews, and optimized images (oh, my!). Lastly, we’ll give you a sneak peek into what we'll be working on next to make Cloudflare Pages your go-to platform for deploying not just static sites, but full-stack applications.

What is Cloudflare Pages?

Cloudflare Pages radically simplifies the process of developing and deploying sites by taking care of all the tedious parts of web development. Now, developers can focus on the fun and creative parts instead.

Seamless builds for developers

Getting started with Cloudflare Pages is as Continue reading

Why Being A Late Technology Adopter Pays Off

As a technologist helping an organization form an IT strategy, I’m usually hesitant to recommend new tech. Why? Because it’s new. Adopting technology early in its lifecycle is a risky endeavor. For most organizations, I find that shiny new tech isn’t worth the risk.

Emerging products and protocols are often accompanied by great fanfare. Talks are delivered at conferences, whitepapers are written, and Gartner Cool Vendor designations are awarded. The idea is to make you and me believe that this new tech solves a problem in a novel way that’s never been done before. This is the thing we’ve been waiting for. This is so much better than it used to be in the bad old times. Right. I’m sure it is.

Despite my cynical tone, I am hopeful when it comes to new tech. I really am. In part, technologists are employed because of tech’s ever-changing landscape. But I am also dubious during any technology’s formative years. I take a wait-and-see approach, and I’ve never been sorry for doing so. I believe that being a late, not early, adopter of technology pays off for most organizations.

You Aren’t Stuck With Abandoned Tech

If you adopt early, you are hoping Continue reading

Samsung demos 512GB DDR5 memory aimed at supercomputing, AI workloads

Samsung Electronics last month announced the creation of a 512GB DDR5 memory module, its first since the JEDEC consortium developed and released the DDR5 standard in July of last year.The new modules are double the max capacity of existing DDR4 and offer up to 7,200Mbps in data transfer rate, double that of conventional DDR4. The memory will be able to handle high-bandwidth workloads in applications such as supercomputing, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and data analytics, the company says. Read more: World's fastest supercomputers: Fugaku still No. 1To read this article in full, please click here

How to shop for a colocation provider

If you want to move assets out of your data center but for whatever reason can’t shift to the cloud, a colocation, or “colo” for short, is increasingly a viable option.Colo is where the client buys the compute, storage, and networking equipment but instead of putting it into their own data centers, they put them in the data center of a hosting company. They still own and manage the hardware, but they don’t have responsibility for manage the facilities—heating, cooling, lighting, physical security, etcNow see "How to manage your power bill while adopting AI" As such, colocation facilities attract considerable interest from enterprises. IDC puts the 2020 US colocation market at $9 billion, growing to $12.2 billion by 2024 for a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8%. Grand View Research estimates the global data-center colocation market size was valued at $40.31 billion US dollars in 2019 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12.9% from 2020 to 2027. Gartner makes the bravest prediction, saying that by 2025, 85% of infrastructure strategies will integrate on-premises, colocation, cloud, and edge delivery options, compared with 20% in 2020.To read this article in full, please click here

Samsung demos 512GB DDR5 memory aimed at supercomputing, AI workloads

Samsung Electronics last month announced the creation of a 512GB DDR5 memory module, its first since the JEDEC consortium developed and released the DDR5 standard in July of last year.The new modules are double the max capacity of existing DDR4 and offer up to 7,200Mbps in data transfer rate, double that of conventional DDR4. The memory will be able to handle high-bandwidth workloads in applications such as supercomputing, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and data analytics, the company says. Read more: World's fastest supercomputers: Fugaku still No. 1To read this article in full, please click here

How to shop for a colocation provider

If you want to move assets out of your data center but for whatever reason can’t shift to the cloud, a colocation, or “colo” for short, is increasingly a viable option.Colo is where the client buys the compute, storage, and networking equipment but instead of putting it into their own data centers, they put them in the data center of a hosting company. They still own and manage the hardware, but they don’t have responsibility for manage the facilities—heating, cooling, lighting, physical security, etcNow see "How to manage your power bill while adopting AI" As such, colocation facilities attract considerable interest from enterprises. IDC puts the 2020 US colocation market at $9 billion, growing to $12.2 billion by 2024 for a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8%. Grand View Research estimates the global data-center colocation market size was valued at $40.31 billion US dollars in 2019 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12.9% from 2020 to 2027. Gartner makes the bravest prediction, saying that by 2025, 85% of infrastructure strategies will integrate on-premises, colocation, cloud, and edge delivery options, compared with 20% in 2020.To read this article in full, please click here

Will open networking lock you in?

There’s open, then there’s open.  At least that seems to be the case with network technology. Maybe it’s the popularity and impact of open-source software, or maybe it’s just that the word “open” makes you think of being wild, happy, and free—whatever it is, the concept of openness in networking is catching on. Which means, of course, that the definition is getting fuzzier every day.When I talk with enterprises, they seem to think that openness in networking is the opposite of proprietary, which they then define is a technology for which there is a single source. That suggests that open networking is based on technology for which multiple sources exist, but as logical as that sounds, it may not help much.To read this article in full, please click here

Major League Baseball makes a run at network visibility

Major League Baseball is taking network visibility to the next level.“There were no modern network-management systems in place before I came in. It was all artisanally handcrafted configurations,” says Jeremy Schulman, who joined MLB two years ago as principal network-automation software engineer. Tech Spotlight: Analytics Analytics in the cloud: Key challenges and how to overcome them (CIO) Collaboration analytics: Yes, you can track employees. Should you? (Computerworld) How data poisoning attacks corrupt machine learning models (CSO) How to excel with data analytics (InfoWorld) Major League Baseball makes a run at network visibility (Network World) Legacy systems, including PRTG for SNMP-based monitoring and discrete management tools from network vendors, allowed MLB to collect data from switches and routers, for example, and track metrics such as bandwidth usage. But the patchworked tools were siloed and didn’t provide comprehensive visibility.To read this article in full, please click here

Major League Baseball makes a run at network visibility

Major League Baseball is taking network visibility to the next level.“There were no modern network-management systems in place before I came in. It was all artisanally handcrafted configurations,” says Jeremy Schulman, who joined MLB two years ago as principal network-automation software engineer. Tech Spotlight: Analytics Analytics in the cloud: Key challenges and how to overcome them (CIO) Collaboration analytics: Yes, you can track employees. Should you? (Computerworld) How data poisoning attacks corrupt machine learning models (CSO) How to excel with data analytics (InfoWorld) Major League Baseball makes a run at network visibility (Network World) Legacy systems, including PRTG for SNMP-based monitoring and discrete management tools from network vendors, allowed MLB to collect data from switches and routers, for example, and track metrics such as bandwidth usage. But the patchworked tools were siloed and didn’t provide comprehensive visibility.To read this article in full, please click here

Start Automating Public Cloud Deployments with Infrastructure-as-Code

One of my readers sent me a series of “how do I get started with…” questions including:

I’ve been doing networking and security for 5 years, and now I am responsible for our cloud infrastructure. Anything to do with networking and security in the cloud is my responsibility along with another team member. It is all good experience but I am starting to get concerned about not knowing automation, IaC, or any programming language.

No need to worry about that, what you need (to start with) is extremely simple and easy-to-master. Infrastructure-as-Code is a simple concept: infrastructure configuration is defined in machine-readable format (mostly text files these days) and used by a remediation tool like Terraform that compares the actual state of the deployed infrastructure with the desired state as defined in the configuration files, and makes changes to the actual state to bring it in line with how it should look like.

Developers, Developers, Developers: Welcome to Developer Week 2021

Developers, Developers, Developers: Welcome to Developer Week 2021
Developers, Developers, Developers: Welcome to Developer Week 2021

Runtimes, serverless, edge compute, containers, virtual machines, functions, pods, virtualenv. All names for things developers need to go from writing code to running code. It’s a painful reality that for most developers going from code they’ve written to code that actually runs can be hard.

Excruciatingly, software development is made hard by dependencies on modules, by scaling, by security, by cost, by availability, by deployment, by builds, and on and on. All the ugly reality of crystallizing thoughts into lines of code that actually run, successfully, somewhere, more than once, non-stop, and at scale.

And so… Welcome to Developer Week 2021!

Like we have done in previous Innovation Weeks (such as Security Week or Privacy Week), we will be making many (about 20) announcements of products and features to make developers’ lives easier. And by easy I mean removing the obstacles that stop you, dear developer, from writing code and deploying it so it scales to Internet size.

And Cloudflare Workers, our platform for software developers who want to deploy Internet-facing applications that start instantly and scale Internetly, has been around since 2017 (or to put it in perspective, since iPhone 8) and helping developers code and deploy in seconds Continue reading

AWS Cloud Development Kit: Now I Get It

The AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) is an "open source software development framework to define your cloud application resources using familiar programming languages". When CDK launched in 2019, I remember reading the announcement and thinking, "Ok, AWS wants their own Terraform-esque tool. No surprise given how popular Terraform is." Months later, my friend and colleague Matt M. was telling me how he was using CDK in a project he was working on and how crazy cool it was.

I finally decided to give CDK a go for one of my projects. Here is what I discovered.

A Near 2 year Part Time Project Done – A sustaining Model!

Ever since I got interested in plants getting some sort of metrics has been a part time obsession.

Iteration 1 – No wireless and no outdoor model with always on usb power.

Iteration 2 – Learnt about ESP8266 microcontroller and deep sleep feature

Iteration 3 – Saving battery through deep sleep and battery power instead of usb mains, Adding ESP32 Microcontroller.

Iteration 4 – Study about Lithium Ion batteries

Iteration 5 – Making model wireless and usb free power, running on batteries

Iteration 6 – Containerising the entire software and integration with AWS and Telnyx

Iteration 7 – Making the model sustaining on itself through solar power and making it weather resistant

This completes an End to End IOT Model with a micro controller , a moisture sensor and two lithium ION batteries which get charged based on a small solar panel. Am going to extend this to LoRa Wan and will try to achieve ultra low power long distance.

The idea is that there is an allotment 6 kms from the place I live and I will see if AWS and LoRa Wan Supports me for protocol needs.

Docker containers associated with this project

Grafana Dashboard – Retrieving data Continue reading

For CPU Makers and OEMs Alike, It’s A Platform View

Dell took a look at the two weeks between the rollouts by AMD and Intel of their latest server processors and, after some debate, decided to unveil its entire portfolio of new and enhanced systems – featuring the new chips from both vendors – at the launch of AMD’s latest Epyc silicon rather than announce servers in line with the chip makers’ timing.

For CPU Makers and OEMs Alike, It’s A Platform View was written by Jeffrey Burt at The Next Platform.