Chris Nerney

Author Archives: Chris Nerney

Are Tesla’s Dojo supercomputer claims valid?

Self-driving cars must possess the ability to recognize road conditions, make decisions and take appropriate action, all in real time. This requires on-board artificial intelligence (AI) that ensures vehicles are able to “learn,” along with super-fast processing power.Tesla unveiled a custom AI chip back in 2019 and soon began manufacturing cars with it. Now Tesla has unveiled a second internally designed semiconductor to power the company’s Dojo supercomputer.Chip shortage will hit hardware buyers for months to years The D1, according to Tesla, features 362teraFLOPS of processing power. This means it can perform 362 trillion floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), Tesla says.To read this article in full, please click here

Are Tesla’s Dojo supercomputer claims valid?

Self-driving cars must possess the ability to recognize road conditions, make decisions and take appropriate action, all in real time. This requires on-board artificial intelligence (AI) that ensures vehicles are able to “learn,” along with super-fast processing power.Tesla unveiled a custom AI chip back in 2019 and soon began manufacturing cars with it. Now Tesla has unveiled a second internally designed semiconductor to power the company’s Dojo supercomputer.Chip shortage will hit hardware buyers for months to years The D1, according to Tesla, features 362teraFLOPS of processing power. This means it can perform 362 trillion floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), Tesla says.To read this article in full, please click here

Wi-Fi 7 is coming, and Intel makes it sound great

Wi-Fi has been with us since 1997, predating Google, the iPhone, and robotic vacuum cleaners. It’s basically a legacy technology! Wi-Fi resources Test and review of 4 Wi-Fi 6 routers: Who’s the fastest? How to determine if Wi-Fi 6 is right for you Five questions to answer before deploying Wi-Fi 6 Wi-Fi 6E: When it’s coming and what it’s good for Despite its maturity, Wi-Fi is always evolving to meet the needs of consumers and enterprises. There have been eight versions of the Wi-Fi network protocol, with the latest (Wi-Fi 6 or, to use its “street name,” 802.11ax) being released in 2019. Each iteration has been faster and more reliable than its predecessor, a comforting trend. Three-and-a-half generations (Wi-Fi 4, Wi-Fi 5, and Wi-Fi 6 and 6E) currently are in use.To read this article in full, please click here

Don’t let subdomains sink your security

If your enterprise has a website (and one certainly would hope so in 2021!), it also has subdomains. These prefixes of your organization’s main domain name are essential for putting structural order to the content and services on your website, thus preventing online visitors from instantly fleeing in terror, disdain, or confusion.Large enterprises can have thousands of subdomains. IBM, for example, has roughly 60,000 subdomains, while Walmart.com has “only” 2,132 subdomains.What is DNS and how it works Whatever value subdomains bring to enterprises--and they bring plenty--they present more targets for bad actors. Why, just last year the subdomains of Chevron, 3M, Warner Brothers, Honeywell, and many other large organizations were hijacked by hackers who redirected visitors to sites featuring porn, malware, online gambling, and other activities of questionable propriety.To read this article in full, please click here

Don’t let subdomains sink your security

If your enterprise has a website (and one certainly would hope so in 2021!), it also has subdomains. These prefixes of your organization’s main domain name are essential for putting structural order to the content and services on your website, thus preventing online visitors from instantly fleeing in terror, disdain, or confusion.Large enterprises can have thousands of subdomains. IBM, for example, has roughly 60,000 subdomains, while Walmart.com has “only” 2,132 subdomains.What is DNS and how it works Whatever value subdomains bring to enterprises--and they bring plenty--they present more targets for bad actors. Why, just last year the subdomains of Chevron, 3M, Warner Brothers, Honeywell, and many other large organizations were hijacked by hackers who redirected visitors to sites featuring porn, malware, online gambling, and other activities of questionable propriety.To read this article in full, please click here

The Department of Defense, networking, and the speed of relevance

If yours is like most enterprises, it is under intense competitive pressure to understand faster, decide faster, and act faster in an increasingly dynamic environment.For businesses, that environment is the economy. But for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), the environment in which they must leverage technology and tactics against deadly adversaries is more like a battlefield. And all but the most self-aggrandizing sales directors would agree that the stakes on the battlefield are considerably higher than growing revenue and capturing market share. (Not that they are trivial!) Read more: Cisco tool taps telemetry for network, security analyticsTo read this article in full, please click here

The Department of Defense, networking, and the speed of relevance

If yours is like most enterprises, it is under intense competitive pressure to understand faster, decide faster, and act faster in an increasingly dynamic environment.For businesses, that environment is the economy. But for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), the environment in which they must leverage technology and tactics against deadly adversaries is more like a battlefield. And all but the most self-aggrandizing sales directors would agree that the stakes on the battlefield are considerably higher than growing revenue and capturing market share. (Not that they are trivial!) Read more: Cisco tool taps telemetry for network, security analyticsTo read this article in full, please click here

Department of Defense works to integrate battlefield intel networks

If yours is like most enterprises, it is under intense competitive pressure to understand faster, decide faster, and act faster in an increasingly dynamic environment.For businesses, that environment is the economy. But for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), the environment in which they must leverage technology and tactics against deadly adversaries is more like a battlefield. And all but the most self-aggrandizing sales directors would agree that the stakes on the battlefield are considerably higher than growing revenue and capturing market share. (Not that they are trivial!) Read more: Cisco tool taps telemetry for network, security analyticsTo read this article in full, please click here

Department of Defense works to integrate battlefield intel networks

If yours is like most enterprises, it is under intense competitive pressure to understand faster, decide faster, and act faster in an increasingly dynamic environment.For businesses, that environment is the economy. But for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), the environment in which they must leverage technology and tactics against deadly adversaries is more like a battlefield. And all but the most self-aggrandizing sales directors would agree that the stakes on the battlefield are considerably higher than growing revenue and capturing market share. (Not that they are trivial!) Read more: Cisco tool taps telemetry for network, security analyticsTo read this article in full, please click here

Experimental Morpheus CPU is ‘mind-bogglingly terrible’ to crack

To many of us, Morpheus is a character played by Laurence Fishburne in The Matrix movies. To others, Morpheus is the Greek god of sleep and dreams. To others still, Morpheus is a digital synthesizer from the early ‘90s that developed a cult following.The Morpheus we’re discussing today, however, is of far greater relevance to enterprise IT professionals who constantly are searching for ways to protect their networks from the ever-present threat of hackers.Developed by a team at the University of Michigan, this Morpheus is a CPU that ingeniously protects against hacking attempts by using encryption that changes every few milliseconds, which prevents intruders from getting a fix on how a system is set up. This makes cracking the encryption nearly impossible and is sure to drive hackers crazy.To read this article in full, please click here

Experimental Morpheus CPU is ‘mind-bogglingly terrible’ to crack

To many of us, Morpheus is a character played by Laurence Fishburne in The Matrix movies. To others, Morpheus is the Greek god of sleep and dreams. To others still, Morpheus is a digital synthesizer from the early ‘90s that developed a cult following.The Morpheus we’re discussing today, however, is of far greater relevance to enterprise IT professionals who constantly are searching for ways to protect their networks from the ever-present threat of hackers.Developed by a team at the University of Michigan, this Morpheus is a CPU that ingeniously protects against hacking attempts by using encryption that changes every few milliseconds, which prevents intruders from getting a fix on how a system is set up. This makes cracking the encryption nearly impossible and is sure to drive hackers crazy.To read this article in full, please click here

Could antiferromagnetic chips replace silicon?

We probably wouldn’t have a Digital Age without silicon.The second most abundant element in the Earth’s crust (oxygen is No. 1), silicon is cheap and has the ability to conduct electricity and/or act as an insulator. Converted into silicon wafers, it powers the computers, smartphones and other electronic devices we use to work and, importantly, to avoid work. So clearly silicon is indispensable.Or maybe not. Our insatiable demand for more and more data, along with the need to store it, is pushing the limits of what silicon can deliver in terms of speed, density, and security. In a bid to find a worthy successor to silicon-based memory devices, MIT physicists are zeroing in something called antiferromagnets.To read this article in full, please click here

Could antiferromagnetic chips replace silicon?

We probably wouldn’t have a Digital Age without silicon.The second most abundant element in the Earth’s crust (oxygen is No. 1), silicon is cheap and has the ability to conduct electricity and/or act as an insulator. Converted into silicon wafers, it powers the computers, smartphones and other electronic devices we use to work and, importantly, to avoid work. So clearly silicon is indispensable.Or maybe not. Our insatiable demand for more and more data, along with the need to store it, is pushing the limits of what silicon can deliver in terms of speed, density, and security. In a bid to find a worthy successor to silicon-based memory devices, MIT physicists are zeroing in something called antiferromagnets.To read this article in full, please click here

The timeline for quantum computing is getting shorter

Financial traders rely heavily on computer financial simulations for making buying and selling decisions. Specifically, “Monte Carlo” simulations are used to assess risk and simulate prices for a wide range of financial instruments. These simulations also can be used in corporate finance and for portfolio management.But in a digital world where other industries routinely leverage real-time data, financial traders are working with the digital equivalent of the Pony Express. That’s because Monte Carlo simulations involve such an insanely large number of complex calculations that they consume more time and computational resources than a 14-team, two-quarterback online fantasy football league with Superflex position.To read this article in full, please click here

The timeline for quantum computing is getting shorter

Financial traders rely heavily on computer financial simulations for making buying and selling decisions. Specifically, “Monte Carlo” simulations are used to assess risk and simulate prices for a wide range of financial instruments. These simulations also can be used in corporate finance and for portfolio management.But in a digital world where other industries routinely leverage real-time data, financial traders are working with the digital equivalent of the Pony Express. That’s because Monte Carlo simulations involve such an insanely large number of complex calculations that they consume more time and computational resources than a 14-team, two-quarterback online fantasy football league with Superflex position.To read this article in full, please click here

Next-gen networks: Feds have cash for good ideas

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is not inclined to wait for next-generation (NextG) networks. And who can blame it? NextG promises faster cellular, Wi-Fi, and satellite networks, all of which can be used to enhance data streaming, wireless communications, analytics, and automation.For the NSF, this translates into improved national defense, education, public health and safety, transportation, and digital infrastructure. For enterprises, NextG means greater efficiency, flexibility, business insights, and more opportunities to replace human workers with robots. (I’m just sayin’.)To read this article in full, please click here

Wi-Fi in 2025: It could be watching your every move

I consider myself a techno-optimist. Technology has improved life for humanity in countless ways, like the wheel, the printing press, selfie sticks—these marvels have enriched us all.So too has Wi-Fi. If not for Wi-Fi, no one could idly stream YouTube videos on company laptops through rogue hotspots at a busy-but-socially-distanced coffeeshop when we’re supposed to be doing our jobs. Which is to say none of us could fully leverage the remote network-connectivity tools that allow enterprise employees to be productive any time and from anywhere.To read this article in full, please click here

Wi-Fi in 2025: It could be watching your every move

I consider myself a techno-optimist. Technology has improved life for humanity in countless ways, like the wheel, the printing press, selfie sticks—these marvels have enriched us all.So too has Wi-Fi. If not for Wi-Fi, no one could idly stream YouTube videos on company laptops through rogue hotspots at a busy-but-socially-distanced coffeeshop when we’re supposed to be doing our jobs. Which is to say none of us could fully leverage the remote network-connectivity tools that allow enterprise employees to be productive any time and from anywhere.To read this article in full, please click here

5G research by DARPA will lead to commercial applications

The U.S. military is devoting time and resources into research on improving the signal quality and security of 5G--efforts that, if history is any indication, eventually will result in technologies that are available to commercial enterprises. 5G resources What is 5G? Fast wireless technology for enterprises and phones How 5G frequency affects range and speed Private 5G can solve some problems that Wi-Fi can’t Private 5G keeps Whirlpool driverless vehicles rolling 5G can make for cost-effective private backhaul CBRS can bring private 5G to enterprises As Breaking Defense reports, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has awarded roughly $500,000 in “exploratory” funding to wireless startup MixComm to demonstrate whether silicon-based millimeter wave (mmWave) power amplifiers can economically boost radio signals so the Department of Defense (DoD) can leverage 5G wireless connectivity globally.To read this article in full, please click here

Researchers show that quantum computers can reason

Quantum computers can learn to reason, even when burdened with uncertainty and incomplete data, concludes a team of scientists from U.K.-based quantum software developer Cambridge Quantum Computing (CQC).This ability is similar to intuitive human reasoning, which allows people to draw conclusions and make decisions despite a lack of comprehensive information. CQC’s research confirms a belief among many scientists that quantum computers have a natural propensity for reasoning.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] In a paper published on the open-access scholarly archive arXiv, CQC scientists detail how they developed methods that demonstrated how quantum machines can learn to infer hidden information from general probabilistic reasoning models. If replicable, these methods could improve a broad range of applications for quantum computing, including medical diagnoses, fault-detection in mission-critical machines, and financial forecasting for investment management.To read this article in full, please click here