Neal Weinberg

Author Archives: Neal Weinberg

SD-WAN buyers guide: Key questions to ask vendors (and yourself)

Prior to the pandemic, SD-WAN was primarily a niche technology pitched to enterprises as a way to cut costs and improve WAN flexibility by allowing traffic to burst directly from the branch office to the Internet, rather than backhauling it over expensive MPLS links to a central site. SD-WAN resources What is SD-WAN and what does it mean for networking, security, cloud? 10 SD-WAN features you're probably not using but should be SD-WAN may be the key to smart network services SD-WAN and analytics: A marriage made for the new normal Native SD-WAN monitoring tools are not enough, survey says Today, SD-WAN has emerged as a key enabler of the post-COVID enterprise in which mission critical applications live in multiple clouds, employees connect and collaborate from everywhere, and remote access to applications like Office 365, Salesforce and Zoom must be fast, secure, reliable, optimized, and automated for maximum business productivity and end user satisfaction.To read this article in full, please click here

The 10 most powerful companies in enterprise networking 2021

When the pandemic hit last spring, employees suddenly began working from home, enterprises quickly shifted applications to the cloud, and secure remote access became critical. As we move (hopefully) beyond the pandemic, it’s clear that enterprise networking has been changed forever.Companies are looking at new technologies like SASE to combine networking and edge security into one manageable platform. Zero-trust network access has moved from the back burner to the hotseat as companies seek a more effective way to fight cyberattacks in a world where the traditional perimeter no longer exists. The lines between security and networking are blurring, with traditional security companies moving into the networking realm, and networking companies upping their security game.To read this article in full, please click here

The 10 most powerful companies in enterprise networking 2021

When the pandemic hit last spring, employees suddenly began working from home, enterprises quickly shifted applications to the cloud, and secure remote access became critical. As we move (hopefully) beyond the pandemic, it’s clear that enterprise networking has been changed forever.Companies are looking at new technologies like SASE to combine networking and edge security into one manageable platform. Zero-trust network access has moved from the back burner to the hotseat as companies seek a more effective way to fight cyberattacks in a world where the traditional perimeter no longer exists. The lines between security and networking are blurring, with traditional security companies moving into the networking realm, and networking companies upping their security game.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT cloud services: How they stack up against DIY

Eager to cash in on the massive potential for IoT-based data storage and analytics, public-cloud vendors are diving headlong into the IoT market, offering enterprises everything from individual building blocks to fully managed services and every combination in between. Tech Spotlight: Cloud Computing Cloud or bust: IT leaders go all in on cloud computing (CIO) Migrating to hosted Exchange: Do’s and don’ts (Computerworld) AWS, Google Cloud Platform and Azure: How their security features compare (CSO) From legacy to the cloud: The 3 stages of enterprise modernization (InfoWorld) IoT cloud services: How they stack up against DIY (Network World) The amount of data that is expected to be generated by IoT devices is staggering. IDC predicts that by 2025, there will be 55.9 billion connected devices worldwide, 75% of which will be connected to an IoT platform. IDC estimates the amount of data generated from IoT devices will be 79.4 zettabytes by 2025.To read this article in full, please click here

COVID-19 upends disaster recovery planning

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed gaps in enterprise disaster recovery and business continuity planning in areas such as remote access, networking, SaaS applications and ransomware. Over the past year, IT execs have been scrambling to plug those gaps and update DR plans on the fly.More significantly, the pandemic triggered fundamental IT changes at many organizations, including a hasty migration of applications to the cloud, an acceleration of digital transformation efforts, the emergency provisioning of new systems and services outside of traditional procurement procedures, and, in many industries, the emergence a new category of full-time, work-at-home employees who are handling mission-critical data on their personal devices.To read this article in full, please click here

COVID-19 upends disaster recovery planning

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed gaps in enterprise disaster recovery and business continuity planning in areas such as remote access, networking, SaaS applications and ransomware. Over the past year, IT execs have been scrambling to plug those gaps and update DR plans on the fly.More significantly, the pandemic triggered fundamental IT changes at many organizations, including a hasty migration of applications to the cloud, an acceleration of digital transformation efforts, the emergency provisioning of new systems and services outside of traditional procurement procedures, and, in many industries, the emergence a new category of full-time, work-at-home employees who are handling mission-critical data on their personal devices.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT, edge computing and AI projects pay off for asset-based enterprises

Bill Holmes, facilities manager at the Corona, Calif., plant that produces the iconic Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars, remembers all too well walking the factory floor with a crude handheld vibration analyzer and then plugging the device into a computer to get readings on the condition of his equipment.While all of the woodworking was done by hand when Leo Fender founded Fender Musical Instruments Corp. 75 years ago, today the guitar necks and bodies are produced with computer-controller woodworking routers, then handed off to the craftsmen who build the final product. Holmes says he is always looking for the latest technological advances to solve problems (he uses robotics to help paint the guitars), and there's no problem more vexing than equipment breakdowns.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT, edge computing and AI projects pay off for asset-based enterprises

Bill Holmes, facilities manager at the Corona, Calif., plant that produces the iconic Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars, remembers all too well walking the factory floor with a crude handheld vibration analyzer and then plugging the device into a computer to get readings on the condition of his equipment.While all of the woodworking was done by hand when Leo Fender founded Fender Musical Instruments Corp. 75 years ago, today the guitar necks and bodies are produced with computer-controller woodworking routers, then handed off to the craftsmen who build the final product. Holmes says he is always looking for the latest technological advances to solve problems (he uses robotics to help paint the guitars), and there's no problem more vexing than equipment breakdowns.To read this article in full, please click here

Highflying Nvidia widens its reach into enterprise data centers

Nvidia's plan to buy British chip powerhouse Arm Ltd. for a cool $40 billion is just the latest move in the company's evolution from a gaming chip maker to a game changer in enterprise data centers.Nvidia's goal is to take its high-powered processor technology and, through innovation, high-profile acquisitions (Mellanox, Cumulus and Arm) and strategic alliances (VMware, Check Point and Red Hat), provide a full-stack, hardware/software offering that brings the power of AI to companies that are modernizing their data centers. READ MORE: The 10 most powerful companies in enterprise networking To read this article in full, please click here

Highflying Nvidia widens its reach into enterprise data centers

Nvidia's plan to buy British chip powerhouse Arm Ltd. for a cool $40 billion is just the latest move in the company's evolution from a gaming chip maker to a game changer in enterprise data centers.Nvidia's goal is to take its high-powered processor technology and, through innovation, high-profile acquisitions (Mellanox, Cumulus and Arm) and strategic alliances (VMware, Check Point and Red Hat), provide a full-stack, hardware/software offering that brings the power of AI to companies that are modernizing their data centers. READ MORE: The 10 most powerful companies in enterprise networking To read this article in full, please click here

How to consolidate network management tools

Network executives are making strides in their ongoing efforts to reduce network management tool sprawl, but there's still plenty of room for improvement on the road to a consolidated, platform-based toolset.Nearly two-thirds of enterprises (64%) in EMA's Network Management Megatrends 2020 report indicated they use between four and 10 tools, and another 17% use more than 10 tools. And that's just the tools that companies will admit to.To read this article in full, please click here

How AI can create self-driving data centers

Most of the buzz around artificial intelligence (AI) centers on autonomous vehicles, chatbots, digital-twin technology, robotics, and the use of AI-based 'smart' systems to extract business insight out of large data sets. But AI and machine learning (ML) will one day play an important role down among the server racks in the guts of the enterprise data center. AI's potential to boost data-center efficiency – and by extension improve the business – falls into four main categories:To read this article in full, please click here

How AI can create self-driving data centers

Most of the buzz around artificial intelligence (AI) centers on autonomous vehicles, chatbots, digital-twin technology, robotics, and the use of AI-based 'smart' systems to extract business insight out of large data sets. But AI and machine learning (ML) will one day play an important role down among the server racks in the guts of the enterprise data center. AI's potential to boost data-center efficiency – and by extension improve the business – falls into four main categories:To read this article in full, please click here

The 10 most powerful companies in enterprise networking 2020

Between the pandemic and the subsequent economic upheaval, these are challenging times for everyone. But the networking industry has some elements in its favor. Technologies such as Wi-Fi, VPNs, SD-WAN, videoconferencing and collaboration are playing an essential role in maintaining business operations and will play an even greater role in the reopening and recovery phase.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

IBM goes all-in on hybrid cloud

With the 2019 acquisition of open-source powerhouse Red Hat under its belt and a new cloud-savvy CEO at the helm, IBM is looking to reverse a decade of declining revenue and sagging stock prices with a bold strategy focused on hybrid cloud.CEO Arvind Krishna, who formerly led IBM's cloud and cognitive computing division and engineered the $34 billion Red Hat acquisition, made IBM's intentions clear in a LinkedIn post to employees in his first day on the job: "Hybrid cloud and AI are the two dominant forces driving change for our clients and must have the maniacal focus of the entire company. IBM has already built enduring platforms in mainframe, services, and middleware. I believe now is the time to build a fourth platform in hybrid cloud."To read this article in full, please click here

IBM’s big hybrid-cloud gamble

With the 2019 acquisition of open-source powerhouse Red Hat under its belt and a new cloud-savvy CEO at the helm, IBM is looking to reverse a decade of declining revenue and sagging stock prices with a bold strategy focused on hybrid cloud.CEO Arvind Krishna, who formerly led IBM's cloud and cognitive computing division and engineered the $34 billion Red Hat acquisition, made IBM's intentions clear in a LinkedIn post to employees in his first day on the job: "Hybrid cloud and AI are the two dominant forces driving change for our clients and must have the maniacal focus of the entire company. IBM has already built enduring platforms in mainframe, services, and middleware. I believe now is the time to build a fourth platform in hybrid cloud."To read this article in full, please click here

Top 10 underused SD-WAN features

Early SD-WAN products provided enterprises with a way to decommission expensive, inflexible MPLS links, connect branch offices directly to the cloud and optimize WAN traffic. But many of the initial SD-WAN offerings lacked features such as integrated firewalls, application-aware routing, and advanced data analytics.Over time, SD-WAN vendors have beefed up their products to encompass a robust set of additional features. However, many enterprises are not taking advantage of the full capabilities of the latest SD-WAN products and managed service options. READ MORE: 5 reasons to choose a managed SD-WAN and 5 reasons to think twiceTo read this article in full, please click here

The VPN is dying, long live zero trust

The venerable VPN, which has for decades provided remote workers with a secure tunnel into the enterprise network, is facing extinction as enterprises migrate to a more agile, granular security framework called zero trust, which is better adapted to today’s world of digital business.VPNs are part of a security strategy based on the notion of a network perimeter; trusted employees are on the inside and untrusted employees are on the outside. But that model no longer works in a modern business environment where mobile employees access the network from a variety of inside or outside locations, and where corporate assets reside not behind the walls of an enterprise data center, but in multi-cloud environments.To read this article in full, please click here

The VPN is dying, long live zero trust

The venerable VPN, which has for decades provided remote workers with a secure tunnel into the enterprise network, is facing extinction as enterprises migrate to a more agile, granular security framework called zero trust, which is better adapted to today’s world of digital business.VPNs are part of a security strategy based on the notion of a network perimeter; trusted employees are on the inside and untrusted employees are on the outside. But that model no longer works in a modern business environment where mobile employees access the network from a variety of inside or outside locations, and where corporate assets reside not behind the walls of an enterprise data center, but in multi-cloud environments.To read this article in full, please click here

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