Jon Gold

Author Archives: Jon Gold

5G in 2020: Still just a private party

To hear the major mobile carriers talk about it, 5G is here. They’ve deployed it, it works, and it’s ready to start changing the world just about right away, with ultra-fast connectivity, low latency and a dramatically improved ability to handle huge numbers of different connections at once.Eventually, that will all be true – but, according to experts in the field, it isn’t yet, and most of it won’t take place within the coming calendar year. The 3GPP standards that will underpin all new-radio 5G technology are still not yet finalized, although that is expected to happen in early 2020, which means the much-touted 5G deployments in the U.S. are based partially on pre-standard technology.To read this article in full, please click here

Verizon, Amazon team to offer 5G edge cloud computing via AWS Wavelength

Amazon and Verizon will offer the ability to run AWS-based applications with ultra-low latency via the former’s new Wavelength edge service, the companies announced this week at AWS re:Invent, letting organizations realize the benefits of edge computing without having to roll their own edge devices.The idea is a pretty simple one: Place small data centers running AWS’ software next to Verizon’s 5G points of presence. What this means is that applications running in that 5G coverage area can send their data to those remote edge data centers for rapid processing, as opposed to traveling across Verizon’s network, to the Internet at large, to AWS, and all the way back down the chain.To read this article in full, please click here

Amazon joins the quantum computing crowd with Braket testbed

Amazon’s initial foray into the heavily hyped world of quantum computing is a virtual sandbox in which companies can test potential quantum-enabled applications and generally get to grips with the new technology, the company announced Monday.The product is named Braket, after a system of notation used in quantum physics. The idea, according to Amazon, is to democratize access to quantum computing in a small way. Most organizations aren’t going to own their own quantum computers for the foreseeable future; they’re impractically expensive and require a huge amount of infrastructure even for the limited proof-of-concept models at the current cutting-edge.To read this article in full, please click here

Amazon joins the quantum computing crowd with Braket testbed

Amazon’s initial foray into the heavily hyped world of quantum computing is a virtual sandbox in which companies can test potential quantum-enabled applications and generally get to grips with the new technology, the company announced Monday.The product is named Braket, after a system of notation used in quantum physics. The idea, according to Amazon, is to democratize access to quantum computing in a small way. Most organizations aren’t going to own their own quantum computers for the foreseeable future; they’re impractically expensive and require a huge amount of infrastructure even for the limited proof-of-concept models at the current cutting-edge.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT in 2020: The awkward teenage years

Much of the hyperbole around the Internet of Things isn’t really hyperbole anymore – the instrumentation of everything from cars to combine harvesters to factories is just a fact of life these days. IoT’s here to stay.Yet despite the explosive growth – one widely cited prediction from Gartner says that the number of enterprise and automotive IoT endpoints will reach 5.8 billion in 2020 – the IoT market’s ability to address its known flaws and complications has progressed at a far more pedestrian pace. That means ongoing security woes and a lack of complete solutions are most of what can be safely predicted for the coming year.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT in 2020: The awkward teenage years

Much of the hyperbole around the Internet of Things isn’t really hyperbole anymore – the instrumentation of everything from cars to combine harvesters to factories is just a fact of life these days. IoT’s here to stay.Yet despite the explosive growth – one widely cited prediction from Gartner says that the number of enterprise and automotive IoT endpoints will reach 5.8 billion in 2020 – the IoT market’s ability to address its known flaws and complications has progressed at a far more pedestrian pace. That means ongoing security woes and a lack of complete solutions are most of what can be safely predicted for the coming year.To read this article in full, please click here

Forrester: Edge computing is about to bloom

The next calendar year will be the one that propels edge computing into the enterprise technology limelight for good, according to a set of predictions from Forrester Research.While edge computing is primarily an IoT-related phenomenon, Forrester said that addressing the need for on-demand compute and real-time app engagements will also play a role in driving the growth of edge computing in 2020.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] What it all boils down to, in some ways, is that form factors will shift sharply away from traditional rack, blade or tower servers in the coming year, depending on where the edge technology is deployed. An autonomous car, for example, won’t be able to run a traditionally constructed server.To read this article in full, please click here

Big Four carriers want to rule IoT by simplifying it

The Internet of Things promises a transformative impact on a wide range of industries, but along with that promise comes an enormous new level of complexity for the network and those in charge of maintaining it. For the major mobile data carriers in the U.S., that fact suggests an opportunity.The core of the carriers’ appeal for IoT users is simplicity. Opting for Verizon or AT&T instead of in-house connectivity removes a huge amount of the work involved in pulling an IoT implementation together.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.] Operationally, it’s the same story. The carrier is handling the network management and security functionality, and everything involved in the connectivity piece is available through a centralized management console.To read this article in full, please click here

Watson IoT chief: AI can broaden IoT services

IBM thrives on the complicated, asset-intensive part of the enterprise IoT market, according to Kareem Yusuf, GM of the company’s Watson IoT business unit. From helping seaports manage shipping traffic to keeping technical knowledge flowing within an organization, Yusuf said that the idea is to teach artificial intelligence to provide insights from the reams of data generated by such complex systems.Predictive maintenance is probably the headliner in terms of use cases around asset-intensive IoT, and Yusuf said that it’s a much more complicated task than many people might think. It isn’t simply a matter of monitoring, say, pressure levels in a pipe somewhere and throwing an alert when they move outside of norms. It’s about aggregate information on failure rates and asset planning, that a company can have replacements and contingency plans ready for potential failures.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: VMware, Nokia beef up their IoT

The major U.S. mobile carriers are eager participants in the rise of IoT, and it’s tough to argue that they don’t have a major role to play – the ability to connect largely anywhere, coupled with the ability to handle high-throughput applications, means that cellular data can be an attractive option for the connectivity piece of an IoT deployment.AT&T announced a deal with Vodafone last week to interconnect their respective narrow-band IoT networks across the Atlantic, mating AT&T’s U.S. coverage with Vodafone’s in western Europe. That means that businesses with NB-IoT deployments in those areas can use that single network to connect their entire implementation. Not to be outdone, Sprint announced that it, too, is rolling out NB-IoT on its Curiosity IoT platform. Sprint shared its plans during a panel discussion at Mobile World Congress in Los Angeles last week.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Carriers expand NB-IoT footprints, Congress eyes security bill, and ‘IT asbestos’ looms

The major U.S. mobile carriers are eager participants in the rise of IoT, and it’s tough to argue that they don’t have a major role to play – the ability to connect largely anywhere, coupled with the ability to handle high-throughput applications, means that cellular data can be an attractive option for the connectivity piece of an IoT deployment.AT&T announced a deal with Vodafone last week to interconnect their respective narrow-band IoT networks across the Atlantic, mating AT&T’s U.S. coverage with Vodafone’s in western Europe. That means that businesses with NB-IoT deployments in those areas can use that single network to connect their entire implementation. Not to be outdone, Sprint announced that it, too, is rolling out NB-IoT on its Curiosity IoT platform. Sprint shared its plans during a panel discussion at Mobile World Congress in Los Angeles last week.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Carriers expand NB-IoT footprints, Congress eyes security bill, and ‘IT asbestos’ looms

The major U.S. mobile carriers are eager participants in the rise of IoT, and it’s tough to argue that they don’t have a major role to play – the ability to connect largely anywhere, coupled with the ability to handle high-throughput applications, means that cellular data can be an attractive option for the connectivity piece of an IoT deployment.AT&T announced a deal with Vodafone last week to interconnect their respective narrow-band IoT networks across the Atlantic, mating AT&T’s U.S. coverage with Vodafone’s in western Europe. That means that businesses with NB-IoT deployments in those areas can use that single network to connect their entire implementation. Not to be outdone, Sprint announced that it, too, is rolling out NB-IoT on its Curiosity IoT platform. Sprint shared its plans during a panel discussion at Mobile World Congress in Los Angeles last week.To read this article in full, please click here

Google claims quantum supremacy over supercomputers

The results of an experiment performed on Google’s Sycamore quantum computer demonstrate that theoretical quantum computing designs can work as expected, the company announced today in a paper published in the journal Nature.Formulating the problem was the first hurdle. The company’s research team eventually settled on comparing the Sycamore computer’s output to that of a modern, classical supercomputer in the task of reading the state of a pseudo-random quantum circuit. This results in a computational challenge that should be comparatively simple for Sycamore, but enormously difficult for a supercomputer equipped with traditional silicon.To read this article in full, please click here

Google claims quantum supremacy over supercomputers

The results of an experiment performed on Google’s Sycamore quantum computer demonstrate that theoretical quantum computing designs can work as expected, the company announced today in a paper published in the journal Nature.Formulating the problem was the first hurdle. The company’s research team eventually settled on comparing the Sycamore computer’s output to that of a modern, classical supercomputer in the task of reading the state of a pseudo-random quantum circuit. This results in a computational challenge that should be comparatively simple for Sycamore, but enormously difficult for a supercomputer equipped with traditional silicon.To read this article in full, please click here

How the oil and gas industry exploits IoT

Like many traditional industries that have long-standing, tried-and-true methods of operation, the oil-and-gas sector hasn’t been the quickest to embrace IoT technology – despite having had instrumentation on drilling rigs, pipelines and refining facilities for decades, the extraction industry has only recently begun to work with modern IoT.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

1 2 3 22