ESXi 5 on Cisco UCS – No Local Disks Showing Up

I am installing ESXi 5 on a Cisco UCS B440 M1 blade, and ran into some local disk issues. I used both the stock ESXi 5 image from VMware, as well as the recently released image from Cisco that contains the latest UCS drivers. Same issue on both. The issue was that when I got to the disk selection screen on the ESXi installation, I did not see any disks:

ESXi 5 on Cisco UCS – No Local Disks Showing Up

I am installing ESXi 5 on a Cisco UCS B440 M1 blade, and ran into some local disk issues. I used both the stock ESXi 5 image from VMware, as well as the recently released image from Cisco that contains the latest UCS drivers. Same issue on both. The issue was that when I got to the disk selection screen on the ESXi installation, I did not see any disks:

ESXi 5 on Cisco UCS – No Local Disks Showing Up

I am installing ESXi 5 on a Cisco UCS B440 M1 blade, and ran into some local disk issues. I used both the stock ESXi 5 image from VMware, as well as the recently released image from Cisco that contains the latest UCS drivers. Same issue on both. The issue was that when I got to the disk selection screen on the ESXi installation, I did not see any disks:

My CCIE Journey Begins

I am happy to say that I have officially started putting things together for my CCIE R/S studies. I have been and will continue to be pulled in many different directions, but since my CCNP was completed a few months ago, and I recently passed my VCP exam, I decided that the time was now to begin the long journey ahead. I have a few other certifications in mind, and I will have to carefully weigh how they impact (or preferably do not impact) my CCIE studies, but this journey is important to me personally and professionally, so I’m pulling the trigger.

My CCIE Journey Begins

I am happy to say that I have officially started putting things together for my CCIE R/S studies. I have been and will continue to be pulled in many different directions, but since my CCNP was completed a few months ago, and I recently passed my VCP exam, I decided that the time was now to begin the long journey ahead. I have a few other certifications in mind, and I will have to carefully weigh how they impact (or preferably do not impact) my CCIE studies, but this journey is important to me personally and professionally, so I’m pulling the trigger.

IPv6 and flows (using nfsen)

This will be about already having nfsen/nfdump configured, and are looking to just make a flow profile to graph IPv6 traffic from your routers. If you are looking to get nfsen iniitially configured, definitely follow their instructions on their site.

Say you have an sFlow capable router like…picking one totally not at random…..a Brocade XMR or MLX(e), and you want some basic flow data, especially IPv6. Depending on how many routers you are going to collect flow data from, will determine how beefy of a machine you will need. I know that at $lastjob, it was a hefty CPU (and definitely more than 1), tons of RAM, and hardware RAID. Right now, I’m using dual quad-core Xeon, tons of RAM and a small hardware RAID, but this machine serves many purposes. Right now I’m also only polling 4 MLX routers.

Go ahead and access your nfsen website, and on the Profiles pulldown, select “New Profile …”. In the creation dialog, give the profile whatever title you like; I went with the generic title of “IPv6″. If you want to add it to a group or make one for it, do as you please. I left that alone so I’d Continue reading

Thoughts on vXLAN and Cisco 1000v

I know vXLAN has been around for a year now, but because of the reviews it got from the community immediately upon announcement, I decided to let it mature as an idea before I got involved. Here are some of my thoughts after attending a vXLAN session by Cisco at VMworld 2012. vXLAN really just solves one problem. Most virtual infrastructures depend on L2 connectivity. vMotion is a good example of this.

Thoughts on vXLAN and Cisco 1000v

I know vXLAN has been around for a year now, but because of the reviews it got from the community immediately upon announcement, I decided to let it mature as an idea before I got involved. Here are some of my thoughts after attending a vXLAN session by Cisco at VMworld 2012. vXLAN really just solves one problem. Most virtual infrastructures depend on L2 connectivity. vMotion is a good example of this.

What’s New in vSphere 5.1 Networking

I attended the VMworld 2012 session that covered the new features in vSphere 5.1 with regards to networking. Many features were rolled out to both VDS and the standard switch, and other features just had improved functionality. First off, apparently it’s now VDS, not vDS. This announcement came hours after the announcement that VXLAN was being changed to vXLAN. Um…okay, I guess? Anyways - The speaker pointed out at the beginning that a big change was that many of these features were being rolled out to both the standard and distributed switches.

What’s New in vSphere 5.1 Networking

I attended the VMworld 2012 session that covered the new features in vSphere 5.1 with regards to networking. Many features were rolled out to both VDS and the standard switch, and other features just had improved functionality. First off, apparently it’s now VDS, not vDS. This announcement came hours after the announcement that VXLAN was being changed to vXLAN. Um…okay, I guess? Anyways - The speaker pointed out at the beginning that a big change was that many of these features were being rolled out to both the standard and distributed switches.

OSPF Area Range – Active vs Passive Advertisment

I was troubleshooting an OSPF area range summarization and came upon something I haven’t seen before called Passive Advertisement. There weren’t too many Cisco documents that explained it so I decided to post a really quick description explaining it in little detail and where you could see it . This could be useful for the CCIE troubleshooting section, when dealing with OSPF area summarization problems.

I will use R3 to demonstrate. This router is connected to area 0 and area 1 which makes it the only ABR connecting the two areas. R3 should be sending a summary route 4.4.0.0/16 for the two component routes 4.4.4.0/24 and 4.4.5.0/24. Looks pretty simple. To verify, I check the output of show ip ospf to make sure the area 0 range 4.4.0.0 255.255.0.0 command is configured:

R3#sh ip ospf
Routing Process "ospf 1" with ID 10.3.3.3
Start time: 00:00:23.404, Time elapsed: 00:01:06.080
Supports only single TOS(TOS0) routes
Supports opaque LSA
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Supports area transit capability
It is an area border and autonomous system boundary router
Redistributing External Routes from,
rip
Router is Continue reading

Important FCoE Considerations – Cisco Nexus and Netapp

I ran into an issue that presented itself two different ways, each at a different customer. I posted a while back about a customer that wanted to use only a single Nexus 5000, since that was all that was available. I wanted to bundle all four CNA ports on the Netapp storage array to the Netapp SAN. However, after I created this port channel and bound the virtual fibre channel (VFC) interface to it, the VFC interface would not come up.

Important FCoE Considerations – Cisco Nexus and Netapp

I ran into an issue that presented itself two different ways, each at a different customer. I posted a while back about a customer that wanted to use only a single Nexus 5000, since that was all that was available. I wanted to bundle all four CNA ports on the Netapp storage array to the Netapp SAN. However, after I created this port channel and bound the virtual fibre channel (VFC) interface to it, the VFC interface would not come up.

Important FCoE Considerations – Cisco Nexus and Netapp

I ran into an issue that presented itself two different ways, each at a different customer. I posted a while back about a customer that wanted to use only a single Nexus 5000, since that was all that was available. I wanted to bundle all four CNA ports on the Netapp storage array to the Netapp SAN. However, after I created this port channel and bound the virtual fibre channel (VFC) interface to it, the VFC interface would not come up.

Can’t remember the IPv6 6to4 conversion?

What is IPv6 6to4 tunnel address? 2022::/16 or 2002::/16? How do you convert the IPv4 address into IPv6 6to4 tunnel address? Well there is the long way, which you should understand and then there is the easy way in case you need to configure it really quickly. I found this nice method where you can use the IPv6 General Prefix feature to automatically calculate the conversion. Originally this feature was used to create a variable for IPv6 network, the “general-prefix”, to easily change all IPv6 addresses in case reassignment of IP subnets.

 

Configuration is pretty simple. First make sure to have the 6to4 Tunnel’s source interface configured, in my example that’s Loopback0 150.1.1.1.

Rack1R1#sh ip int brief loop0
Interface                  IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol
Loopback0                  150.1.1.1       YES manual up                    up

Then configure the IPv6 general-prefix for 6to4 type using loop0.

Rack1R1(config)#ipv6 general-prefix MY-GEN-PRE 6to4 loopback0

Rack1R1#sh ipv6 general-prefix
IPv6 Prefix MY-GEN-PRE, acquired via 6to4
2002:9601:101::/48 Valid lifetime infinite, preferred lifetime infinite

The way you apply it on the tunnel is using regular ipv6 address command:

R1(config)#int tun1
R1(config-if)#ipv6 address ?
  WORD                General prefix name
  X:X:X:X::X          IPv6 link-local address
  X:X:X:X::X/  IPv6 prefix
  autoconfig          Obtain address  Continue reading