Andy Patrizio

Author Archives: Andy Patrizio

How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers

The Internet as we have all known it mirrors the design of old mainframes with dumb terminals: The data path is almost entirely geared toward data coming down the network from a central location. It doesn’t matter if it’s your iPhone or a green text terminal, the fast pipe has always been down, with relatively little data sent up.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers

The Internet as we have all known it mirrors the design of old mainframes with dumb terminals: The data path is almost entirely geared toward data coming down the network from a central location. It doesn’t matter if it’s your iPhone or a green text terminal, the fast pipe has always been down, with relatively little data sent up.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

Amazon denies reports it is targeting the network switch market

Amazon Web Services has denied publicly and privately to Cisco that it is targeting Cisco’s bread-and-butter network switching market after a report emerged a few days ago claiming AWS was intending to do just that.A report in The Information last Friday said AWS was preparing to enter the network switching market, using off-brand “white box” products powered by open-source software. The news quickly made the rounds on Monday, when everyone started paying attention (including me), and the result was a big hit to Cisco’s stock.To read this article in full, please click here

Amazon denies reports it is targeting the network switch market

Amazon Web Services has denied publicly and privately to Cisco that it is targeting Cisco’s bread-and-butter network switching market after a report emerged a few days ago claiming AWS was intending to do just that.A report in The Information last Friday said AWS was preparing to enter the network switching market, using off-brand “white box” products powered by open-source software. The news quickly made the rounds on Monday, when everyone started paying attention (including me), and the result was a big hit to Cisco’s stock.To read this article in full, please click here

Amazon rumored to be entering the networking market

It’s hard to remember a time when people thought Amazon was nuts for going into the cloud computing business, since it was so far removed from the company’s core ecommerce business. No one is laughing now.It seems history could repeat itself. According to an article in The Information, Amazon is rumored to be targeting a new industry, albeit one dominated by a giant player and multiple healthy competitors — the network switching business. The move would put it in direct competition with Cisco, HPE, Juniper Networks, and Arista.To read this article in full, please click here

Amazon rumored to be entering the networking market

It’s hard to remember a time when people thought Amazon was nuts for going into the cloud computing business, since it was so far removed from the company’s core ecommerce business. No one is laughing now.It seems history could repeat itself. According to an article in The Information, Amazon is rumored to be targeting a new industry, albeit one dominated by a giant player and multiple healthy competitors — the network switching business. The move would put it in direct competition with Cisco, HPE, Juniper Networks, and Arista.To read this article in full, please click here

Amazon rumored to be entering the networking market

It’s hard to remember a time when people thought Amazon was nuts for going into the cloud computing business, since it was so far removed from the company’s core ecommerce business. No one is laughing now.It seems history could repeat itself. According to an article in The Information, Amazon is rumored to be targeting a new industry, albeit one dominated by a giant player and multiple healthy competitors — the network switching business. The move would put it in direct competition with Cisco, HPE, Juniper Networks, and Arista.To read this article in full, please click here

Two studies show the data center is thriving instead of dying

Once again research is showing that rumors of the demise of the data center are greatly exaggerated. One study shows across-the-board growth in IT spending, while a second predicts that the financial services sector is really set to explode.Market research firm IHS Markit surveyed IT managers at 151 North American organizations and found that most of them expect to at least double the amount of physical servers in their data centers by 2019.“We are seeing a continuation of the enterprise DC growth phase signaled by last year’s respondents and confirmed by respondents to this study. Enterprises are transforming their on-premises DC to a cloud architecture, making the enterprise DC a first-class citizen as enterprises build their multi-clouds,” wrote Clifford Grossner, senior research director in the cloud and data center research practice at IHS Markit.To read this article in full, please click here

Two studies show the data center is thriving instead of dying

Once again research is showing that rumors of the demise of the data center are greatly exaggerated. One study shows across-the-board growth in IT spending, while a second predicts that the financial services sector is really set to explode.Market research firm IHS Markit surveyed IT managers at 151 North American organizations and found that most of them expect to at least double the amount of physical servers in their data centers by 2019.“We are seeing a continuation of the enterprise DC growth phase signaled by last year’s respondents and confirmed by respondents to this study. Enterprises are transforming their on-premises DC to a cloud architecture, making the enterprise DC a first-class citizen as enterprises build their multi-clouds,” wrote Clifford Grossner, senior research director in the cloud and data center research practice at IHS Markit.To read this article in full, please click here

Baidu takes a major leap as an AI player with new chip, Intel alliance

China’s Baidu made two big moves that are going to make it a major player in the artificial intelligence (AI) space: an extremely powerful new chip designed to compete with Google’s Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) and a wide-spanning alliance with Intel.First, the company introduced the Kunlun, a cloud-to-edge range of AI chips built to accommodate high-performance requirements of a wide variety of AI scenarios. The announcement was made at Baidu Create, a developer show that is starting to look an awful lot like Google I/O in terms of content and sessions.Kunlun leverages Baidu’s AI ecosystem, which includes AI scenarios such as search ranking and deep learning frameworks, including its open source deep learning framework called PaddlePaddle. Kunlun can be used in everything from autonomous vehicles to data centers.To read this article in full, please click here

Baidu takes a major leap as an AI player with new chip, Intel alliance

China’s Baidu made two big moves that are going to make it a major player in the artificial intelligence (AI) space: an extremely powerful new chip designed to compete with Google’s Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) and a wide-spanning alliance with Intel.First, the company introduced the Kunlun, a cloud-to-edge range of AI chips built to accommodate high-performance requirements of a wide variety of AI scenarios. The announcement was made at Baidu Create, a developer show that is starting to look an awful lot like Google I/O in terms of content and sessions.Kunlun leverages Baidu’s AI ecosystem, which includes AI scenarios such as search ranking and deep learning frameworks, including its open source deep learning framework called PaddlePaddle. Kunlun can be used in everything from autonomous vehicles to data centers.To read this article in full, please click here

Softening chip market hit harder by trade wars

Seasonal softness and a looming tariff dispute between China and the U.S. put a dampener on the chip market, and it only looks to be getting worse with China interfering in the business of a U.S. company.Last week, Micron Technology, the number four chip vendor, according to IHS Markit, said China is blocking sales of some of its memory products. While based in Boise, Idaho, and having a large fabrication plant there, Micron also makes a lot of products in China for the Chinese market. And Micron is currently in a legal battle with Taiwanese chip maker United Microelectronics over alleged patent violations in China.Last week, a Chinese court granted a preliminary injunction banning Micron subsidiaries in China from manufacturing or selling DRAM modules and NAND flash chips used in solid-state drives. The good news, according to Micron, is that the injunction covers only 1 percent of its revenue.To read this article in full, please click here

Softening chip market hit harder by trade wars

Seasonal softness and a looming tariff dispute between China and the U.S. put a dampener on the chip market, and it only looks to be getting worse with China interfering in the business of a U.S. company.Last week, Micron Technology, the number four chip vendor, according to IHS Markit, said China is blocking sales of some of its memory products. While based in Boise, Idaho, and having a large fabrication plant there, Micron also makes a lot of products in China for the Chinese market. And Micron is currently in a legal battle with Taiwanese chip maker United Microelectronics over alleged patent violations in China.Last week, a Chinese court granted a preliminary injunction banning Micron subsidiaries in China from manufacturing or selling DRAM modules and NAND flash chips used in solid-state drives. The good news, according to Micron, is that the injunction covers only 1 percent of its revenue.To read this article in full, please click here

While no one was looking, California passed its own GDPR

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is widely viewed as a massively expensive and burdensome privacy regulation that can be a major headache and pitfall for American firms doing business in Europe. Many firms, including Facebook, have sought ways around the law to avoid having to deal with the burden of compliance.Well, there is no weaseling out now. Last week, with no fanfare, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law AB375, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, the California equivalent of GDPR that mirrors the EU law in many ways.To read this article in full, please click here

While no one was looking, California passed its own GDPR

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is widely viewed as a massively expensive and burdensome privacy regulation that can be a major headache and pitfall for American firms doing business in Europe. Many firms, including Facebook, have sought ways around the law to avoid having to deal with the burden of compliance.Well, there is no weaseling out now. Last week, with no fanfare, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law AB375, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, the California equivalent of GDPR that mirrors the EU law in many ways.To read this article in full, please click here

While no one was looking, California passed its own GDPR

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is widely viewed as a massively expensive and burdensome privacy regulation that can be a major headache and pitfall for American firms doing business in Europe. Many firms, including Facebook, have sought ways around the law to avoid having to deal with the burden of compliance.Well, there is no weaseling out now. Last week, with no fanfare, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law AB375, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, the California equivalent of GDPR that mirrors the EU law in many ways.To read this article in full, please click here

The Lustre HPC file system has another new home — and it’s the right one

After years of bouncing from one company to another, the Lustre file system that is so popular in high-performance computing (HPC) has been sold yet again. This time it went to an enterprise storage vendor. Finally, it’s in the hands of a company that makes sense.DataDirect Networks (DDN) announced it purchased the Lustre File System from Intel this week as Intel looks to pare down non-essential products. DDN got all assets and the Lustre development team, who are undoubtedly relieved. The announcement was made at the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) in Frankfurt, Germany.[ Check out AI boosts data-center availability, efficiency. Also learn what hyperconvergence is and whether you’re ready for hyperconverged storage. | For regularly scheduled insights, sign up for Network World newsletters. ] Lustre's history Lustre (which is a portmanteau of Linux and cluster) is a parallel distributed file system that supports multiple computer clusters with thousands of nodes. It started out as an academic research project and was later acquired by Sun Microsystems, which was in turn acquired by Oracle.To read this article in full, please click here

Rackspace, HPE expand on-premises cloud with pay-as-you-go Kubernetes

HPE and Rackspace are building on their alliance from last November, when they first introduced an OpenStack-based pay-per-use system designed to compete with public cloud providers.The two now offer pay as you go to Rackspace’s VMware and Kubernetes private cloud services. Rackspace launched its Kubernetes private cloud managed service just last month. The initial pay-as-you-go system was for standard server-side apps. This new feature adds Kubernetes container management as an option.Rackspace has deployed HPE’s new GreenLake Flex Capacity service to provide the pay-as-you-go pricing model. GreenLake is one of many programs by enterprise hardware vendors to provide on-demand pricing to companies looking to rein in data center costs.To read this article in full, please click here

Rackspace, HPE expand on-premises cloud with pay-as-you-go Kubernetes

HPE and Rackspace are building on their alliance from last November, when they first introduced an OpenStack-based pay-per-use system designed to compete with public cloud providers.The two now offer pay as you go to Rackspace’s VMware and Kubernetes private cloud services. Rackspace launched its Kubernetes private cloud managed service just last month. The initial pay-as-you-go system was for standard server-side apps. This new feature adds Kubernetes container management as an option.Rackspace has deployed HPE’s new GreenLake Flex Capacity service to provide the pay-as-you-go pricing model. GreenLake is one of many programs by enterprise hardware vendors to provide on-demand pricing to companies looking to rein in data center costs.To read this article in full, please click here

The silver lining in the Intel CEO drama

I assume that by now you’ve heard the news that Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has stepped down for reportedly violating the company's strict policy against having relationships with employees. As CFO Bob Swan takes the reigns, the question of who will replace Krzanich is front and center.Several analysts I’ve spoken to even before this happened said they think Intel needs to look to the outside for its next CEO. In its 50-year history, the company has had only six CEOs, all of them insiders. Intel has a reputation as a tough place to work; nobody treads water at Intel. In the volatile Silicon Valley, I found Intel was a place where people either came and went fast or hung around forever. If you are cut out for its culture, expect to be promoted up the food chain rather quickly.To read this article in full, please click here