Jon Gold

Author Archives: Jon Gold

Experts: Enterprise IoT enters the mass-adoption phase

IoT in general has taken off quickly over the past few years, but experts at the recent IoT World highlighted that the enterprise part of the market has been particularly robust of late – it’s not just an explosion of connected home gadgets anymore.Donna Moore, chairwoman of the LoRa Alliance, an industry group that works to develop and scale low-power WAN technology for mass usage, said on a panel that she’s never seen growth this fast in the sector. “I’d say we’re now in the early mass adopters [stage],” she said. More on IoT:To read this article in full, please click here

Las Vegas targets transport, public safety with IoT deployments

The city of Las Vegas’ pilot program with NTT and Dell, designed to crack down on wrong-way driving on municipal roads, is just part of the big plans that Sin City has for leveraging IoT tech in the future, according to the city's director of technology Michael Sherwood., who sat down with Network World at the IoT World conference in Silicon Valley this week.The system uses smart cameras and does most of its processing at the edge, according to Sherwood. The only information that gets sent back to the city’s private cloud is metadata – aggregated information about overall patterns, for decision-making and targeting purposes, not data about individual traffic incidents and wrong-way drivers.To read this article in full, please click here

Top auto makers rely on cloud providers for IoT

For the companies looking to implement the biggest and most complex IoT setups in the world, the idea of pairing up with AWS, Google Cloud or Azure seems to be one whose time has come. Within the last two months, BMW and Volkswagen have both announced large-scale deals with Microsoft and Amazon, respectively, to help operate their extensive network of operational technology.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

Health care is still stitching together IoT systems

Government regulations, safety and technical integration are all serious issues facing the use of IoT in medicine, but professionals in the field say that medical IoT is movingforward despite the obstacles. A vendor, a doctor, and an IT pro all spoke to Network World about the work involved.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

IoT roundup: VMware, Nokia beef up their IoT

When attempting to understand the world of IoT, it’s easy to get sidetracked by all the fascinating use cases: Automated oil and gas platforms! Connected pet feeders! Internet-enabled toilets! (Is “the Internet of Toilets” a thing yet?) But the most important IoT trend to follow may be the way that major tech vendors are vying to make large portions of the market their own.VMware’s play for a significant chunk of the IoT market is called Pulse IoT Center, and the company released version 2.0 of it this week. It follows the pattern set by other big companies getting into IoT: Leveraging their existing technological strengths and applying them to the messier, more heterodox networking environment that IoT represents.To read this article in full, please click here

Nyansa’s Voyance expands to the IoT

Nyansa announced today that their flagship Voyance product can now apply its AI-based secret sauce to IoT devices, over and above the networking equipment and IT endpoints it could already manage.Voyance – a network management product that leverages AI to automate the discovery of devices on the network and identify unusual behavior – has been around for two years now, and Nyansa says that it’s being used to observe a total of 25 million client devices operating across roughly 200 customer networks. More on IoT:To read this article in full, please click here

Why blockchain (might be) coming to an IoT implementation near you

Companies have found that IoT partners well with a host of other popular enterprise computing technologies of late, and blockchain – the innovative system of distributed trust most famous for underpinning cryptocurrencies – is no exception. Yet while the two phenomena can be complementary in certain circumstances, those expecting an explosion of blockchain-enabled IoT technologies probably shouldn’t hold their breath.Blockchain technology can be counter-intuitive to understand at a basic level, but it’s probably best thought of as a sort of distributed ledger keeping track of various transactions. Every “block” on the chain contains transactional records or other data to be secured against tampering, and is linked to the previous one by a cryptographic hash, which means that any tampering with the block will invalidate that connection. The nodes – which can be largely anything with a CPU in it – communicate via a decentralized, peer-to-peer network to share data and ensure the validity of the data in the chain.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Keeping an eye on energy use and Volkswagen teams with AWS

Much of what’s exciting about IoT technology has to do with getting data from a huge variety of sources into one place so it can be mined for insight, but sensors used to gather that data  are frequently legacy devices from the early days of industrial automation or cheap, lightweight, SoC-based gadgets without a lot of sophistication of their own.Researchers at MIT have devised a system that can gather a certain slice of data from unsophisticated devices that are grouped on the same electrical circuit without adding sensors to each device.[ Check out our corporate guide to addressing IoT security. ] The technology’s called non-intrusive load monitoring, and sits directly on a given building's, vehicle's or other piece of infrastructure’s electrical circuits, identifies devices based on their power usage, and sends alerts when there are irregularities.To read this article in full, please click here

Triton and the new wave of IIoT security threats

As IIoT grows in prominence, so too does its status as a target for malicious hackers – particularly given its increased impact on the physical world; the latest and potentially most dangerous is called Triton.Triton first reared its ugly head near the end of 2017, according to security company Fireeye. It targets an industrial safety system made by Schneider Electric that monitors and secures valves, turbines and the like and shuts them down if it determines they are about to fail and cause explosions or other consequences that could damage the facility or cause harm to people. (It’s named Triton because it targets the widely used Schneider Electric Triconex industrial safety system.)To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

Quantum computing will break your encryption in a few years

Modern public-key encryption is currently good enough to meet enterprise requirements, according to experts. Most cyberattacks target different parts of the security stack these days – unwary users in particular. Yet this stalwart building block of present-day computing is about to be eroded by the advent of quantum computing within the next decade, according to experts.“About 99% of online encryption is vulnerable to quantum computers,” said Mark Jackson, scientific lead for Cambridge Quantum Computing, at the Inside Quantum Technology conference in Boston on Wednesday.[ Now read: What is quantum computing (and why enterprises should care) ] Quantum computers – those that use the principles of quantum entanglement and superposition to represent information, instead of electrical bits – are capable of performing certain types of calculation orders of magnitude more quickly than classical, electronic computers. They’re more or less fringe technology in 2019, but their development has accelerated in recent years, and experts at the IQT conference say that a spike in deployment could occur as soon as 2024.To read this article in full, please click here

Quantum computing will break your encryption in a few years

Modern public-key encryption is currently good enough to meet enterprise requirements, according to experts. Most cyberattacks target different parts of the security stack these days – unwary users in particular. Yet this stalwart building block of present-day computing is about to be eroded by the advent of quantum computing within the next decade, according to experts.“About 99% of online encryption is vulnerable to quantum computers,” said Mark Jackson, scientific lead for Cambridge Quantum Computing, at the Inside Quantum Technology conference in Boston on Wednesday.[ Now read: What is quantum computing (and why enterprises should care) ] Quantum computers – those that use the principles of quantum entanglement and superposition to represent information, instead of electrical bits – are capable of performing certain types of calculation orders of magnitude more quickly than classical, electronic computers. They’re more or less fringe technology in 2019, but their development has accelerated in recent years, and experts at the IQT conference say that a spike in deployment could occur as soon as 2024.To read this article in full, please click here

Mobile World Congress: The time of 5G is (almost) here

If there was one common theme to the blizzard of announcements, demonstrations and general public happenings going on at MWC 2019 in Barcelona this year, it was that everyone from smartphone makers to mobile carriers to hardware manufacturers is wildly excited about the advent of 5G technology.Wireless equipment vendors, like Nokia and Ericsson, both announced slates of 5G customers and rolled out new capabilities aimed at helping 5G reach the critical inflection point. Smartphone manufacturers touted the pending availability of 5G-capable handsets, and silicon vendors trumpeted their 5G-ready chipsets and SIM cards.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Outer space, the building is getting smart, and trucking

The classical view of an IoT deployment is relatively centralized – a company wires sensors to important equipment, the sensors send data back to edge gateways, and the gateways do some limited processing of that data and then send it back to the cloud or to the data center. It’s not simple, but it’s easy enough to understand the principles.Some, however, recognize that vastly different architectures for the IoT are possible, including Fleet Space Technologies, a startup that earlier this month announced that it had reached a million device signups for its ambitious satellite-based IoT edge system, which it’s calling Project Galaxy.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Outer space, the building is getting smart, and trucking

The classical view of an IoT deployment is relatively centralized – a company wires sensors to important equipment, the sensors send data back to edge gateways, and the gateways do some limited processing of that data and then send it back to the cloud or to the data center. It’s not simple, but it’s easy enough to understand the principles.Some, however, recognize that vastly different architectures for the IoT are possible, including Fleet Space Technologies, a startup that earlier this month announced that it had reached a million device signups for its ambitious satellite-based IoT edge system, which it’s calling Project Galaxy.To read this article in full, please click here

Edge security: There’s lots of attack surfaces to worry about

The problem of edge security isn’t unique – many of the issues being dealt with are the same ones that have been facing the general IT sector for decades.But the edge adds its own wrinkles to those problems, making them, in many cases, more difficult to address. Yet, by applying basic information security precautions, most edge deployments can be substantially safer. More about edge networking How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers Edge computing best practices How edge computing can help secure the IoT The most common IoT vulnerability occurs because many sensors and edge computing devices are running some kind of built-in web server to allow for remote access and management. This is an issue because many end-users don’t – or, in some cases, can’t – change default login and password information, nor are they able to seal them off from the Internet at large. There are dedicated gray-market search sites out there to help bad actors find these unsecured web servers, and they can even be found with a little creative Googling, although Joan Pepin, CISO at security and authentication vendor Auth0, said that the search giant has taken steps recently to make that process Continue reading

1 2 3 20