Jon Gold

Author Archives: Jon Gold

Triton and the new wave of IIoT security threats

As IIoT grows in prominence, so too does its status as a target for malicious hackers – particularly given its increased impact on the physical world; the latest and potentially most dangerous is called Triton.Triton first reared its ugly head near the end of 2017, according to security company Fireeye. It targets an industrial safety system made by Schneider Electric that monitors and secures valves, turbines and the like and shuts them down if it determines they are about to fail and cause explosions or other consequences that could damage the facility or cause harm to people. (It’s named Triton because it targets the widely used Schneider Electric Triconex industrial safety system.)To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

Quantum computing will break your encryption in a few years

Modern public-key encryption is currently good enough to meet enterprise requirements, according to experts. Most cyberattacks target different parts of the security stack these days – unwary users in particular. Yet this stalwart building block of present-day computing is about to be eroded by the advent of quantum computing within the next decade, according to experts.“About 99% of online encryption is vulnerable to quantum computers,” said Mark Jackson, scientific lead for Cambridge Quantum Computing, at the Inside Quantum Technology conference in Boston on Wednesday.[ Now read: What is quantum computing (and why enterprises should care) ] Quantum computers – those that use the principles of quantum entanglement and superposition to represent information, instead of electrical bits – are capable of performing certain types of calculation orders of magnitude more quickly than classical, electronic computers. They’re more or less fringe technology in 2019, but their development has accelerated in recent years, and experts at the IQT conference say that a spike in deployment could occur as soon as 2024.To read this article in full, please click here

Quantum computing will break your encryption in a few years

Modern public-key encryption is currently good enough to meet enterprise requirements, according to experts. Most cyberattacks target different parts of the security stack these days – unwary users in particular. Yet this stalwart building block of present-day computing is about to be eroded by the advent of quantum computing within the next decade, according to experts.“About 99% of online encryption is vulnerable to quantum computers,” said Mark Jackson, scientific lead for Cambridge Quantum Computing, at the Inside Quantum Technology conference in Boston on Wednesday.[ Now read: What is quantum computing (and why enterprises should care) ] Quantum computers – those that use the principles of quantum entanglement and superposition to represent information, instead of electrical bits – are capable of performing certain types of calculation orders of magnitude more quickly than classical, electronic computers. They’re more or less fringe technology in 2019, but their development has accelerated in recent years, and experts at the IQT conference say that a spike in deployment could occur as soon as 2024.To read this article in full, please click here

Mobile World Congress: The time of 5G is (almost) here

If there was one common theme to the blizzard of announcements, demonstrations and general public happenings going on at MWC 2019 in Barcelona this year, it was that everyone from smartphone makers to mobile carriers to hardware manufacturers is wildly excited about the advent of 5G technology.Wireless equipment vendors, like Nokia and Ericsson, both announced slates of 5G customers and rolled out new capabilities aimed at helping 5G reach the critical inflection point. Smartphone manufacturers touted the pending availability of 5G-capable handsets, and silicon vendors trumpeted their 5G-ready chipsets and SIM cards.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Outer space, the building is getting smart, and trucking

The classical view of an IoT deployment is relatively centralized – a company wires sensors to important equipment, the sensors send data back to edge gateways, and the gateways do some limited processing of that data and then send it back to the cloud or to the data center. It’s not simple, but it’s easy enough to understand the principles.Some, however, recognize that vastly different architectures for the IoT are possible, including Fleet Space Technologies, a startup that earlier this month announced that it had reached a million device signups for its ambitious satellite-based IoT edge system, which it’s calling Project Galaxy.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Outer space, the building is getting smart, and trucking

The classical view of an IoT deployment is relatively centralized – a company wires sensors to important equipment, the sensors send data back to edge gateways, and the gateways do some limited processing of that data and then send it back to the cloud or to the data center. It’s not simple, but it’s easy enough to understand the principles.Some, however, recognize that vastly different architectures for the IoT are possible, including Fleet Space Technologies, a startup that earlier this month announced that it had reached a million device signups for its ambitious satellite-based IoT edge system, which it’s calling Project Galaxy.To read this article in full, please click here

Edge security: There’s lots of attack surfaces to worry about

The problem of edge security isn’t unique – many of the issues being dealt with are the same ones that have been facing the general IT sector for decades.But the edge adds its own wrinkles to those problems, making them, in many cases, more difficult to address. Yet, by applying basic information security precautions, most edge deployments can be substantially safer. More about edge networking How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers Edge computing best practices How edge computing can help secure the IoT The most common IoT vulnerability occurs because many sensors and edge computing devices are running some kind of built-in web server to allow for remote access and management. This is an issue because many end-users don’t – or, in some cases, can’t – change default login and password information, nor are they able to seal them off from the Internet at large. There are dedicated gray-market search sites out there to help bad actors find these unsecured web servers, and they can even be found with a little creative Googling, although Joan Pepin, CISO at security and authentication vendor Auth0, said that the search giant has taken steps recently to make that process Continue reading

Edge security: There’s lots of attack surfaces to worry about

The problem of edge security isn’t unique – many of the issues being dealt with are the same ones that have been facing the general IT sector for decades.But the edge adds its own wrinkles to those problems, making them, in many cases, more difficult to address. Yet, by applying basic information security precautions, most edge deployments can be substantially safer. More about edge networking How edge networking and IoT will reshape data centers Edge computing best practices How edge computing can help secure the IoT The most common IoT vulnerability occurs because many sensors and edge computing devices are running some kind of built-in web server to allow for remote access and management. This is an issue because many end-users don’t – or, in some cases, can’t – change default login and password information, nor are they able to seal them off from the Internet at large. There are dedicated gray-market search sites out there to help bad actors find these unsecured web servers, and they can even be found with a little creative Googling, although Joan Pepin, CISO at security and authentication vendor Auth0, said that the search giant has taken steps recently to make that process Continue reading

Is jumping ahead to Wi-Fi 6 the right move?

In five years, all you’re going to find is Wi-Fi 6, or what most wireless experts are still calling 802.11ax. But five years is a long time. If you’re considering an early move toward the most cutting-edge Wi-Fi technology on the market, there are some hurdles that you’ll have to overcome.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

Linux Foundation backs a group to boost edge networking

The Linux Foundation announced the foundation of a new umbrella group called LF Edge designed to help unify a fragmented edge-computing marketplace and offer a common framework for future edge projects.The initial announcement lists five open source projects that will serve as the nucleus of the LF Edge framework. Those projects are: EdgeX Foundry – Originated at Dell/EMC, EdgeX Foundry is a platform-agnostic software framework that allows for plug-and-play integration of microservices and is designed to run on any industrial edge gateway, creating a bridge layer between sensors and the cloud. Home Edge Project – Contributed by Samsung, the Home Edge Project looks like an attempt to do for consumer IoT what EdgeX Foundry is doing for industrial IoT – a run-anywhere services layer for home-based IoT devices. Akraino Edge Stack – Taking up the cloud end of the stack is Akraino Edge Stack, which is designed to automate provisioning and offer flexibility and scalability at the back end to businesses trying to run edge services with a cloud back end. The original code was contributed by AT&T. Project EVE – A contribution of IoT software maker Zededa, Project EVE is so named because it’s an edge-virtualization engine. The Continue reading

IoT roundup: Security problems galore and a way to track urinary infections

The two things everybody knows about IoT are that A, its use is growing at a pretty spectacular rate, encompassing use cases from the most frivolous of consumer gadgetry to the most heavy-duty of industrial machinery, and B, it is, as a consequence, a gloriously tempting target for malicious hackers.News related to point B has been making headlines lately, including the results of a study from Gemalto, which found that roughly half of all companies using IoT didn’t even have the basic ability to detect outside interference or hacking on their devices. That is, in a word, bad.To read this article in full, please click here

Edge gateways: Flexible, rugged IoT enablers

Edge gateways have emerged as architectural components that improve the performance of IoT networks, and vendors have stepped up with off-the-shelf devices flexible enough to meet the varying demands of individual deployments.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

IoT devices proliferate, from smart bulbs to industrial vibration sensors

While the IoT is already a well-known phenomenon in the tech world, the specifics of IoT implementations are sometimes less than obvious. Here’s a quick-and-dirty overview of the wildly diverse and still evolving landscape of the IoT devices themselves, divided for your reading pleasure into the consumer and enterprise realms.Consumer IoT devices The consumer side of the IoT is mostly about inserting Internet connectivity into objects that a person born before 1990 wouldn’t really have thought needed it – from the toaster and refrigerator in your kitchen, to the locks on your doors, to your car and your wristwatch.[ Read also: 20 hot jobs ambitious IT pros should shoot for ] Smart home IoT devices are, arguably, the biggest deal on the consumer side of things – some people really like the idea of being able to control their lights, door locks and so on from their smartphones. Smart lightbulbs, locks and their ilk are big business, according to Statista, which estimated the total revenue from their sales at nearly $12 billion in 2018. The devices themselves have a wide range of sophistication – a smartlock could be as simple as a device with a servo to move Continue reading

GE rolls out its industrial IoT platform Predix out into separate company

GE has spun off its industrial internet of things platform into a separate company while making other changes including selling off its interest in field-service software  ServiceMax.These moves shake up of the company’s GE Digital division and also include parting ways with the group’s CEO, Bill Ruh.Predix is GE's ingestion and processing platform for industrial operations data, developed with the idea of providing a standardized way for companies to utilize the information coming from their sensor-equipped industrial gear. One business might use the software, which is delivered in a PaaS format, as a way to automate reliability and maintenance for production line equipment, another might use it to track whether a generator is in danger of breaking down.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Retrofitting vehicle tracking, plus a new IoT standard

The Internet of Things has reached that fun phase in which everyone has started to figure out a wider array of meaningful use cases for the technology, but few of those uses are fully mature. From the industrial IoT and predictive maintenance to nebulous smart city tech the IoT’s hitting a new growth spurt, and one of the newest applications is headed to a highway near you.Or, actually, it’s coming to a really big parking lot somewhere near you. Fleet management is one of the long-promised applications of IoT tech that’s starting to take off lately, with announcements this month from companies like Silicon Labs and Cognosos, who rolled out a vehicle-tracking system for lot operators.To read this article in full, please click here

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