Jon Gold

Author Archives: Jon Gold

IoT, social profit and security: Georgia Tech report outlines the future of smart cities

A new report released by a Georgia Tech-based working group said that the future of smart city technology will be contingent on  businesses and city governments understanding the finer points of IoT technology and the way it affects business models and the lives of citizens. The report analyzes, among other things, the risks and potential rewards of various types of public IoT, from an ethical, technological and practical perspective.One key point researchers made is that IoT deployed in public spaces – in collaboration between city governments, private enterprise and citizens themselves – has a diverse group of stakeholders to answer to. Citizens require transparency and rigorous security and privacy protections, in order to be assured that they can use the technology safely and have a clear understanding of the way their information can be used by the system.To read this article in full, please click here

Q&A: Bill Hoffman of the Industrial Internet Consortium talks AI, IoT and more

Bill Hoffman, president of the Industrial Internet Consortium, has worked with artificial intelligence (AI) for decades. He's been with the IIC since its inception, and he worked with IIC executive director Richard Soley at various AI firms for years before that. Hoffman recently sat down with Network World's Jon Gold for a chat about IoT and the role of automation and AI.NWW: Is this what you guys expected to be working on 20-30 years ago?BF: For us it’s fascinating to see, three decades later, that the term AI actually has a good connotation. It’s funny, but a lot of the systems that we were involved with, which were primarily renamed “decision support systems” – for liability reasons, they didn’t want to call them “expert” systems – a lot of those are still functioning today. So it never really went away, it just went somewhat underground, and people said “OK, that works.”To read this article in full, please click here

You’re probably doing your IIoT implementation wrong

The Industrial internet of things promises a quantum leap forward in automation, centralized management and a wealth of new data and insight that is often too tempting to pass up. But automating a factory floor or a fleet of vehicles is far from simple, and many would-be IIoT adopters are going about the process all wrong, according to experts.To make an IIoT transition a success, the process has to be led by the line-of-business side of the company – not IT. Successful IIoT adopters frame the entire operation as a matter of digital transformation, aimed at addressing specific business problems, rather than as a fun challenge for IT architects to solve.To read this article in full, please click here

6 years on, IPv4 still dominates IPv6

IPv6, the modern version of the Internet Protocol framework that underlies just about everything on the network, is seeing steady uptake among service providers, but still hasn’t pushed its predecessor, IPv4, into obsolescence, according to a report released today by the Internet Society.There are 24 countries in the world where IPv6 totals more than 15% of overall IP traffic, and 49 that have topped the 5% threshold. Yet the Internet Society – a non-profit that works to promulgate internet standards and lobby for open access to the internet – describes the technology as having moved from the “early adoption” development stage to the “early majority” phase.To read this article in full, please click here

Q&A: Cisco’s Theresa Bui on the company’s Kinetic IoT platform

It's been almost a year since Cisco announced Kinetic, a cloud-managed IoT platform aimed at capturing a large and profitable share of the rapidly growing business and industrial IoT market. The executive in charge of Kinetic, Theresa Bui, spoke to us about the platform and how it's architected, in the wake of a flagship customer announcement - the Port of Rotterdam - and a limited partnership with IBM.What’s a customer getting for their money when they buy Cisco Kinetic?As a whole, the platform enables three core, functional capabilities. It allows you to easily and automatically extract data, and how we do that is we ship a library of automated connectors that help you extract data from various data pipes, put it into a model – whether it’s CoAP or MQTT or whatever the flavor that works for you.To read this article in full, please click here

Here’s what the big four U.S. mobile ISPs are doing with IoT

The Internet of Things is a business phenomenon at least as much as it is a technological one, which means that every company in the world with a possible angle on IoT is doing its best to claim a piece of the large and growing pie. In the case of the big four U.S. mobile data providers, the trick is selling more than just connectivity.To talk about the big four as a single entity, however, is slightly misleading. The bigger two – AT&T and Verizon – have a considerable lead in customer reach and technological maturity over T-Mobile and Sprint, with both of the former companies on track to deliver about $1 billion in IoT-related revenue in 2018, according to 451 Research vice president Brian Partridge.To read this article in full, please click here

What the big four U.S. mobile ISPs are doing with IoT

The Internet of Things is a business phenomenon at least as much as it is a technological one, which means that every company in the world with a possible angle on IoT is doing its best to claim a piece of the large and growing pie. In the case of the big four U.S. mobile data providers, the trick is selling more than just connectivity.To talk about the big four as a single entity, however, is slightly misleading. The bigger two – AT&T and Verizon – have a considerable lead in customer reach and technological maturity over T-Mobile and Sprint, with both of the former companies on track to deliver about $1 billion in IoT-related revenue in 2018, according to 451 Research vice president Brian Partridge.To read this article in full, please click here

Google could be getting serious about IoT with release of Android Things

Google I/O, the company's annual developer conference, grabs fewer headlines than it used to in ages past – the reveal of Google Glass was one for the record books, even the biggest Google detractor would have to admit. But Google's still planning to make some waves this year, particularly with what seems likely to be a full roll-out of Android Things 1.0, the variant Android OS designed for IoT.The idea behind Things is to provide a unified, one-size-fits-all software option for the developers of constrained devices like smart displays, kiosks and digital signage, among others. Device makers won’t be allowed to modify parts of Android Things’ code, specifically the parts that ensure Google can flash updates to all devices running the software at any time.To read this article in full, please click here

Google’s going to make some IoT news at I/O 2018

Google I/O, the company's annual developer conference, grabs fewer headlines than it used to in ages past – the reveal of Google Glass was one for the record books, even the biggest Google detractor would have to admit. But Google's still planning to make some waves this year, particularly with what seems likely to be a full roll-out of Android Things 1.0, the variant Android OS designed for IoT.The idea behind Things is to provide a unified, one-size-fits-all software option for the developers of constrained devices like smart displays, kiosks and digital signage, among others. Device makers won’t be allowed to modify parts of Android Things’ code, specifically the parts that ensure Google can flash updates to all devices running the software at any time.To read this article in full, please click here

OSISoft: old-school process-control company on IoT cutting edge

While the eyes of the tech world are on the usual suspects like Google and IBM, as well as high-profile operational tech firms like GE and Siemens, an almost 40-year-old company called OSISoft has quietly leveraged its expertise in process monitoring and management into an impressive list of prominent clients. These include Aramco, the national oil and gas company of Saudi Arabia, which is arguably the single most valuable and profitable company in the world, Chevron, Pacific Gas and Electric, Heineken, Tyson Foods, and Lawrence Livermore National Labs, among many others.OSISoft has a lot more in common with the GEs of the world than with some of the IT-based powerhouses that are making a lot of noise about IoT these days. It’s a company with a long history of experience in real-time data collection, making the transition into an IoT-enabled world a smooth one.To read this article in full, please click here

10 tips to minimize IoT security vulnerabilities

Here’s a handy list of tips that can help you avoid the most common mistakes that business IT pros make when bringing IoT devices onto enterprise networks.The Online Trust Alliance’s new list lays out 10 suggestions for using IoT tech in the enterprise without making the enterprise more vulnerable to security threats. The list centers on awareness and minimizing access to less-secure devices. Having a strong understanding of what devices are actually on the network, what they’re allowed to do, and how secure they are at the outset is key to a successful IoT security strategy.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Splunk debuts IIoT product for in-depth analytics

Splunk is introducing software that enables pulling in information from industrial IoT devices and analyzing it.Called Industrial Asset Intelligence, it is in essence a pre-packaged set of analytical tools used on top of the Splunk Enterprise platform, designed for use in a wide range of IIoT applications, said Seema Haji, the company’s director of product marketing for IoT.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]  “Industry 4.0’s kind of broad – it encompasses customers from transportation, oil and gas, energy and utilities companies,” she said. “These companies are using Splunk enterprise today … we see them using Splunk enterprise to gain insight into their industrial operations.”To read this article in full, please click here

Where will Microsoft spend $5B on IoT?

Microsoft’s announcement of $5 billion in new IoT investment is a public demonstration of the company’s commitment to the internet of things, but it's not immediatly clear what it will spend all that money on.In a statement announcing the new spending – to be spread out over the next four years – Microsoft cited research from A.T. Kearney that said IoT will bring a nearly $2 trillion productivity increase to the global economy and a $177 billion reduction in business costs by the end of the decade.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] There are a lot of use cases for IoT in the enterprise, and Microsoft listed several customer wins in its announcement, including Johnson Controls, Kohler and  the Alaska Department of Transportation. Gartner research vice president for AI and IoT Mark Hung said that it’s possible to divide those cases into internal and external uses.To read this article in full, please click here

Aruba CTO says IoT is great fun to work on

Not everybody in business IT seems like they’re having a great time at their job, but Aruba CTO Partha Narasimhan is an exception. He sat down with Network World at the company’s 2018 Atmosphere conference in Las Vegas to talk IoT, onboarding and more.Like company president Keerti Melkote, Narasimhan noted that Aruba’s experience in onboarding devices during the era of BYOD being an issue has stood it in good stead for IoT, but he said that the technical challenge is far greater.+ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: Getting grounded in intent-based networking + Aruba co-founder: We want to live on the edgeTo read this article in full, please click here

Malicious IoT hackers have a new enemy

IoT security is about the farthest thing from a laughing matter in the world of technology today, threatening global trade, privacy and the basic infrastructure of modern society. So you could be forgiven for being taken aback that the newest defender of vulnerable systems against bad actors looks a little like Johnny 5 from the movie Short Circuit.Researchers at Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering rolled out the HoneyBot robot late last week. In essence, it’s a canary in the digital coal mine, offering an early warning that someone is trying to compromise an organization’s systems.To read this article in full, please click here

Malicious IoT hackers have a new enemy

IoT security is about the farthest thing from a laughing matter in the world of technology today, threatening global trade, privacy and the basic infrastructure of modern society. So you could be forgiven for being taken aback that the newest defender of vulnerable systems against bad actors looks a little like Johnny 5 from the movie Short Circuit.Researchers at Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering rolled out the HoneyBot robot late last week. In essence, it’s a canary in the digital coal mine, offering an early warning that someone is trying to compromise an organization’s systems.To read this article in full, please click here

Aruba co-founder: We want to live on the edge

Tech companies of every stripe are staking their claim to the internet of things, and networking vendors like Aruba are no exception. But to hear co-founder and president Keerti Melkote tell it, his company’s pitch might have a little more heat on it than others.Aruba’s IoT credentials are based on a relatively simple premise – by definition, IoT devices have to be on the network, and they’re one of the bigger fish in that particular pool.[ Find out how 5G wireless could change networking as we know it and how to deal with networking IoT. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The company has a lot of experience in onboarding devices – hard-won during the era of BYOD, covering provisioning, credentials, privilege levels and monitoring – which translates well to the world of IoT, particularly given the urgent need to secure those devices.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT could help at-risk seniors

The internet of things is also, in part, the internet of people, particularly in the plans of an Ontario-based chain of retirement homes and long-term care facilities called Schlegel Villages.The company, which is based in Kitchener, Ontario, designs its facilities to be less institutional-looking and more friendly, preferring to call them “villages.” But it’s got a problem to deal with, as at-risk seniors can sometimes become confused and attempt to leave.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] According to Schlegel’s IT director, Chris Carde, it’s a serious issue.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT could help seniors with dementia

The internet of things is also, in part, the internet of people, particularly in the plans of an Ontario-based chain of retirement homes and long-term care facilities called Schlegel Villages.The company, which is based in Kitchener, Ontario, designs its facilities to be less institutional-looking and more friendly, preferring to call them “villages.” But it’s got a problem to deal with, one all too common to the elderly – dementia.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] According to Schlegel’s IT director, Chris Carde, it’s a serious issue.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT security spending to spike above $1.5 billion next year

The market for IoT security products is set to grow sharply, as the general IoT market becomes ever more ubiquitous, according to a report released this month by Gartner Research. While there are numerous drivers behind the increased demand for IoT security, a growing sense that regulatory compliance will shortly become an issue is one of the most pressing.The report lists security as the top barrier to success for IoT initiatives, according to a survey on IoT adoption conducted by Gartner. A big part of the problem, the report said, is that businesses often don’t have full control over which devices and software are being used at each level of a given IoT project.To read this article in full, please click here

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