Jon Gold

Author Archives: Jon Gold

Georgia Tech research: smart-building and IoT technology are highly fragmented

Greater cooperation among standards bodies, corporations, city governments and other stakeholders is needed so IoT and existing smart-building technology can work together to deliver the full potential of smart cities, according to a Georgia Tech study.The problem is that standards are lacking for current in-building systems, let alone having standards so they can share with newer IoT devices.[ Check out our corporate guide to addressing IoT security. ] One vendor of automation software for, say, elevators might use a much different data format than the manufacturer of a given building’s HVAC systems, making it difficult to integrate these two critical systems into the same framework.To read this article in full, please click here

Georgia Tech research: Smart building and IoT technology are highly fragmented

Greater cooperation among standards bodies, corporations, city governments and other stakeholders is needed so IoT and existing smart-building technology can work together to deliver the full potential of smart cities, according to a Georgia Tech study.The problem is that standards are lacking for current in-building systems, let alone having standards so they can share with newer IoT devices.[ Check out our corporate guide to addressing IoT security. ] One vendor of automation software for, say, elevators might use a much different data format than the manufacturer of a given building’s HVAC systems, making it difficult to integrate these two critical systems into the same framework.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT gets smarter but still needs backend analytics

One way of looking at IoT deployments is this – a large array of not-particularly-sophisticated endpoints, mindlessly sending individual data points like temperature and pressure levels to either an edge device somewhere on a factory floor, or all the way out to a cloud back-end or data center.And that’s largely correct, in many cases, but it’s increasingly not the whole story – IoT endpoints are getting closer and closer to the ability to do their own analysis, leading to simpler architectures and more responsive systems. It’s not the right fit for every use case, but there are types of IoT implementation that are already putting the responsibility for the customizing their own metrics on the devices themselves, and more that could be a fit for such an architecture.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT vendors talk open buildings, black hats and a jam conspiracy

Welcome to what we’re hoping is the first in a long string of regular updates from the world of IoT; everything from security to platform news will be fair game, and the aim is to help you be better grounded in the rapidly expanding Internet of Things space.Schneider’s building open thingsSchneider Electric, the Andover, Mass.,-based building-infrastructure manufacturer, recently rolled out a new open framework for IoT implementations, dubbing the product EcoStruxure Building.[ Check out our corporate guide to addressing IoT security. ] It’s a software platform that makes it easy for sensors and controllers to talk to each other, even in complicated, large-scale building projects where there could be a lot of both types of devices.To read this article in full, please click here

Lab makes data sharing easier so medical IoT devices can be smarter

A Cambridge, Massachusetts, research lab is addressing some of modern medicine’s most overlooked issues with cutting-edge IoT technology and an open-source approach, weaving aging devices and deeply siloed data into an accessible web of medical information.The Medical Device Interoperability Program, or MD PnP, in affiliation with Massachusetts General Hospital and Partners Healthcare, is a hub for research into making medical devices dramatically smarter by making it simpler for them to share the data they gather.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] With more and more people being monitored by IoT devices in hospitals and monitoring themselves with Fitbits and Apple watches, there’s suddenly a lot more digital data than there was before in the world of healthcare.To read this article in full, please click here

Arm flexes flexibility with Pelion IoT announcement

The pervasiveness of Arm-based silicon – it’s everywhere from cars to signage to smartphones to supercomputers – makes the company a natural fit for an internet of things platform like the one it just announced.The Pelion IoT Platform's main selling point is its universality – the company boasts that it’s able to handle “any device, any data, any cloud” – in a marketplace overflowing with vertical-specific solutions. (GE and Siemens make industrial IoT products, other companies make platforms designed specifically to work well in healthcare, fleet management, or agricultural environments, and so on.)[ Check out our corporate guide to addressing IoT security. ] Pelion can sit on an edge device, in a data center, or even in an endpoint, integrating devices into a working ecosystem, although the focus is on the edge.To read this article in full, please click here

Google’s tiny chip represents a big bet on IoT

Google is taking two steps – one in hardware and one in software – to bring its analytics and machine learning capabilities to edge networks and even to individual internet-of-things devices to better deal with the data generated by a growing number of IoT devices, the company said at its Cloud Next technology conference.The first step is Google extending the features of its Cloud IoT software platform to edge networking. The second is a tiny chip that could be integrated in IoT devices themselves and process the data they collect before transmitting it.[ Check out our corporate guide to addressing IoT security. ] Edge computing – which describes an architecture where a specialized computer sits very near to the IoT endpoints themselves to perform analysis and data processing from those endpoints, as opposed to sending that information all the way back to the data center – is very much the up-and-coming model for IoT deployment, particularly in use cases that have strict requirements around latency.To read this article in full, please click here

Q&A: Jeff Wilbur of the Online Trust Alliance on why enterprise IoT security is a lot like BYOD

As consumer Internet of Things (IoT) devices inevitably find their way into the workplace, IT pros need to isolate them from the rest of the enterprise network, perhaps on a network of their own, so they don’t become backdoors exploitable by attackers, according to the head of the Online Trust Alliance.Jeff Wilbur, the director of the alliance, which is an initiative within the larger Internet Society, says that it is better to embrace employees’ IoT devices and allow them to be used safely than to ban them and risk their unauthorized, unprotected use that could undermine network security.To read this article in full, please click here

Q&A: Jeff Wilbur of the Online Trust Alliance on why enterprise IoT security is a lot like BYOD

As consumer IoT devices inevitably find their way into the workplace, IT pros need to isolate them from the rest of the enterprise network, perhaps on a network of their own, so they don’t become backdoors exploitable by attackers, according to the head of the Online Trust Alliance.Jeff Wilbur, the director of the alliance, which is an initiative within the larger Internet Society, says that it is better to embrace employees’ internet-of-things devices and allow them to be used safely than to ban them and risk their unauthorized, unprotected use that could undermine network security.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT, social profit and security: Georgia Tech report outlines the future of smart cities

A new report released by a Georgia Tech-based working group said that the future of smart city technology will be contingent on  businesses and city governments understanding the finer points of IoT technology and the way it affects business models and the lives of citizens. The report analyzes, among other things, the risks and potential rewards of various types of public IoT, from an ethical, technological and practical perspective.One key point researchers made is that IoT deployed in public spaces – in collaboration between city governments, private enterprise and citizens themselves – has a diverse group of stakeholders to answer to. Citizens require transparency and rigorous security and privacy protections, in order to be assured that they can use the technology safely and have a clear understanding of the way their information can be used by the system.To read this article in full, please click here

Q&A: Bill Hoffman of the Industrial Internet Consortium talks AI, IoT and more

Bill Hoffman, president of the Industrial Internet Consortium, has worked with artificial intelligence (AI) for decades. He's been with the IIC since its inception, and he worked with IIC executive director Richard Soley at various AI firms for years before that. Hoffman recently sat down with Network World's Jon Gold for a chat about IoT and the role of automation and AI.NWW: Is this what you guys expected to be working on 20-30 years ago?BF: For us it’s fascinating to see, three decades later, that the term AI actually has a good connotation. It’s funny, but a lot of the systems that we were involved with, which were primarily renamed “decision support systems” – for liability reasons, they didn’t want to call them “expert” systems – a lot of those are still functioning today. So it never really went away, it just went somewhat underground, and people said “OK, that works.”To read this article in full, please click here

6 years on, IPv4 still dominates IPv6

IPv6, the modern version of the Internet Protocol framework that underlies just about everything on the network, is seeing steady uptake among service providers, but still hasn’t pushed its predecessor, IPv4, into obsolescence, according to a report released today by the Internet Society.There are 24 countries in the world where IPv6 totals more than 15% of overall IP traffic, and 49 that have topped the 5% threshold. Yet the Internet Society – a non-profit that works to promulgate internet standards and lobby for open access to the internet – describes the technology as having moved from the “early adoption” development stage to the “early majority” phase.To read this article in full, please click here

You’re probably doing your IIoT implementation wrong

The Industrial internet of things promises a quantum leap forward in automation, centralized management and a wealth of new data and insight that is often too tempting to pass up. But automating a factory floor or a fleet of vehicles is far from simple, and many would-be IIoT adopters are going about the process all wrong, according to experts.To make an IIoT transition a success, the process has to be led by the line-of-business side of the company – not IT. Successful IIoT adopters frame the entire operation as a matter of digital transformation, aimed at addressing specific business problems, rather than as a fun challenge for IT architects to solve.To read this article in full, please click here

Q&A: Cisco’s Theresa Bui on the company’s Kinetic IoT platform

It's been almost a year since Cisco announced Kinetic, a cloud-managed IoT platform aimed at capturing a large and profitable share of the rapidly growing business and industrial IoT market. The executive in charge of Kinetic, Theresa Bui, spoke to us about the platform and how it's architected, in the wake of a flagship customer announcement - the Port of Rotterdam - and a limited partnership with IBM.What’s a customer getting for their money when they buy Cisco Kinetic?As a whole, the platform enables three core, functional capabilities. It allows you to easily and automatically extract data, and how we do that is we ship a library of automated connectors that help you extract data from various data pipes, put it into a model – whether it’s CoAP or MQTT or whatever the flavor that works for you.To read this article in full, please click here

What the big four U.S. mobile ISPs are doing with IoT

The Internet of Things is a business phenomenon at least as much as it is a technological one, which means that every company in the world with a possible angle on IoT is doing its best to claim a piece of the large and growing pie. In the case of the big four U.S. mobile data providers, the trick is selling more than just connectivity.To talk about the big four as a single entity, however, is slightly misleading. The bigger two – AT&T and Verizon – have a considerable lead in customer reach and technological maturity over T-Mobile and Sprint, with both of the former companies on track to deliver about $1 billion in IoT-related revenue in 2018, according to 451 Research vice president Brian Partridge.To read this article in full, please click here

Here’s what the big four U.S. mobile ISPs are doing with IoT

The Internet of Things is a business phenomenon at least as much as it is a technological one, which means that every company in the world with a possible angle on IoT is doing its best to claim a piece of the large and growing pie. In the case of the big four U.S. mobile data providers, the trick is selling more than just connectivity.To talk about the big four as a single entity, however, is slightly misleading. The bigger two – AT&T and Verizon – have a considerable lead in customer reach and technological maturity over T-Mobile and Sprint, with both of the former companies on track to deliver about $1 billion in IoT-related revenue in 2018, according to 451 Research vice president Brian Partridge.To read this article in full, please click here

Google’s going to make some IoT news at I/O 2018

Google I/O, the company's annual developer conference, grabs fewer headlines than it used to in ages past – the reveal of Google Glass was one for the record books, even the biggest Google detractor would have to admit. But Google's still planning to make some waves this year, particularly with what seems likely to be a full roll-out of Android Things 1.0, the variant Android OS designed for IoT.The idea behind Things is to provide a unified, one-size-fits-all software option for the developers of constrained devices like smart displays, kiosks and digital signage, among others. Device makers won’t be allowed to modify parts of Android Things’ code, specifically the parts that ensure Google can flash updates to all devices running the software at any time.To read this article in full, please click here

Google could be getting serious about IoT with release of Android Things

Google I/O, the company's annual developer conference, grabs fewer headlines than it used to in ages past – the reveal of Google Glass was one for the record books, even the biggest Google detractor would have to admit. But Google's still planning to make some waves this year, particularly with what seems likely to be a full roll-out of Android Things 1.0, the variant Android OS designed for IoT.The idea behind Things is to provide a unified, one-size-fits-all software option for the developers of constrained devices like smart displays, kiosks and digital signage, among others. Device makers won’t be allowed to modify parts of Android Things’ code, specifically the parts that ensure Google can flash updates to all devices running the software at any time.To read this article in full, please click here

OSISoft: old-school process-control company on IoT cutting edge

While the eyes of the tech world are on the usual suspects like Google and IBM, as well as high-profile operational tech firms like GE and Siemens, an almost 40-year-old company called OSISoft has quietly leveraged its expertise in process monitoring and management into an impressive list of prominent clients. These include Aramco, the national oil and gas company of Saudi Arabia, which is arguably the single most valuable and profitable company in the world, Chevron, Pacific Gas and Electric, Heineken, Tyson Foods, and Lawrence Livermore National Labs, among many others.OSISoft has a lot more in common with the GEs of the world than with some of the IT-based powerhouses that are making a lot of noise about IoT these days. It’s a company with a long history of experience in real-time data collection, making the transition into an IoT-enabled world a smooth one.To read this article in full, please click here

10 tips to minimize IoT security vulnerabilities

Here’s a handy list of tips that can help you avoid the most common mistakes that business IT pros make when bringing IoT devices onto enterprise networks.The Online Trust Alliance’s new list lays out 10 suggestions for using IoT tech in the enterprise without making the enterprise more vulnerable to security threats. The list centers on awareness and minimizing access to less-secure devices. Having a strong understanding of what devices are actually on the network, what they’re allowed to do, and how secure they are at the outset is key to a successful IoT security strategy.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

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