Jon Gold

Author Archives: Jon Gold

Edge gateways: Flexible, rugged IoT enablers

Edge gateways have emerged as architectural components that improve the performance of IoT networks, and vendors have stepped up with off-the-shelf devices flexible enough to meet the varying demands of individual deployments.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

IoT devices proliferate, from smart bulbs to industrial vibration sensors

While the IoT is already a well-known phenomenon in the tech world, the specifics of IoT implementations are sometimes less than obvious. Here’s a quick-and-dirty overview of the wildly diverse and still evolving landscape of the IoT devices themselves, divided for your reading pleasure into the consumer and enterprise realms.Consumer IoT devices The consumer side of the IoT is mostly about inserting Internet connectivity into objects that a person born before 1990 wouldn’t really have thought needed it – from the toaster and refrigerator in your kitchen, to the locks on your doors, to your car and your wristwatch.[ Read also: 20 hot jobs ambitious IT pros should shoot for ] Smart home IoT devices are, arguably, the biggest deal on the consumer side of things – some people really like the idea of being able to control their lights, door locks and so on from their smartphones. Smart lightbulbs, locks and their ilk are big business, according to Statista, which estimated the total revenue from their sales at nearly $12 billion in 2018. The devices themselves have a wide range of sophistication – a smartlock could be as simple as a device with a servo to move Continue reading

GE rolls out its industrial IoT platform Predix out into separate company

GE has spun off its industrial internet of things platform into a separate company while making other changes including selling off its interest in field-service software  ServiceMax.These moves shake up of the company’s GE Digital division and also include parting ways with the group’s CEO, Bill Ruh.Predix is GE's ingestion and processing platform for industrial operations data, developed with the idea of providing a standardized way for companies to utilize the information coming from their sensor-equipped industrial gear. One business might use the software, which is delivered in a PaaS format, as a way to automate reliability and maintenance for production line equipment, another might use it to track whether a generator is in danger of breaking down.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Retrofitting vehicle tracking, plus a new IoT standard

The Internet of Things has reached that fun phase in which everyone has started to figure out a wider array of meaningful use cases for the technology, but few of those uses are fully mature. From the industrial IoT and predictive maintenance to nebulous smart city tech the IoT’s hitting a new growth spurt, and one of the newest applications is headed to a highway near you.Or, actually, it’s coming to a really big parking lot somewhere near you. Fleet management is one of the long-promised applications of IoT tech that’s starting to take off lately, with announcements this month from companies like Silicon Labs and Cognosos, who rolled out a vehicle-tracking system for lot operators.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Retrofitting vehicle tracking, plus a new IoT stadard

The Internet of Things has reached that fun phase in which everyone has started to figure out a wider array of meaningful use cases for the technology, but few of those uses are fully mature. From the industrial IoT and predictive maintenance to nebulous smart city tech the IoT’s hitting a new growth spurt, and one of the newest applications is headed to a highway near you.Or, actually, it’s coming to a really big parking lot somewhere near you. Fleet management is one of the long-promised applications of IoT tech that’s starting to take off lately, with announcements this month from companies like Silicon Labs and Cognosos, who rolled out a vehicle-tracking system for lot operators.To read this article in full, please click here

How to tell which IoT predictions to pay attention to

It happens every year around this time – every IoT company on the planet, whether it’s a giant platform company, an old-school manufacturing player, or a teeny startup making Internet-enabled baby monitors issues its predictions about the market in the years to come, in the hope that IoT reporters looking for a quick story will write something with a headline like “Internet-enabled baby monitor market to reach $250 billion by 2040, according to cool company.” More on IoT: What is the IoT? How the internet of things works What is edge computing and how it’s changing the network Most powerful Internet of Things companies 10 Hot IoT startups to watch The 6 ways to make money in IoT What is digital twin technology? [and why it matters] Blockchain, service-centric networking key to IoT success Getting grounded in IoT networking and security Building IoT-ready networks must become a priority What is the Industrial IoT? [And why the stakes are so high] Yet those predictions are, to put it kindly, all over the map. A McKinsey & Company estimate suggests that the economic impact of the IoT will reach $11 trillion by 2025. IDC estimates that total spending on IoT will Continue reading

Retail IoT is still coming into its own in 2019

Retailers see some tantalizing possibilities for using IoT technology in their businesses, but 2019 seems likely to feature more pilot programs and small-scale testing than widespread upheaval.Bridging the gap between online and in-person shopping, increased automation, and new ways to engage with customers (mostly by showing them ads) are all concepts with major upside for retailers, but the technology has only recently started to take hold.[ Related: What is the IoT? How the internet of things works. ] Some of IoT’s presence in the retail world isn’t retail-specific. Companies use asset-management systems, integrated HVAC and other smart-building tech just like many other industries, according to analysts, but physical retailers have been having a tough time across the board lately, and investments in new technology can quickly fall down priority lists.To read this article in full, please click here

Sigfox president on building a one-stop-shop for IoT cloud communications

Sigfox, the France-based wireless networking company that is trying to push IoT communications technology into the mainstream with its low-power WAN service, provided through partnerships with mobile carriers who weave its technology into their base stations, just celebrated its third year of doing business in North America.In an interview with Network World, Sigfox USA president Christian Olivier was eager to characterize his company as  an operator or a carrier for the IoT, not an infrastructure provider.To read this article in full, please click here

Sigfox president on building a one-stop shop for IoT cloud communications

Sigfox, the France-based wireless networking company that is trying to push IoT communications technology into the mainstream with its low-power WAN service, provided through partnerships with mobile carriers who weave its technology into their base stations, just celebrated its third year of doing business in North America.In an interview with Network World, Sigfox USA President Christian Olivier was eager to characterize his company as an operator or a carrier for the Internet of Things (IoT), not an infrastructure provider.To read this article in full, please click here

What to expect from Wi-Fi 6 in 2019

Wi-Fi 6 – aka 802.11ax – will begin to make its way into new installations in 2019, bringing with it a host of technological upgrades aimed at simplifying wireless-network problems.The first and most notable feature of the standard is that it’s designed to operate in today’s increasingly congested radio environments. It supports multi-user, multiple-input, multiple-output (MU-MIMO) technology, meaning that a given access point can handle traffic from up to eight users at the same time and at the same speed. Previous-generation APs still divide their attention and bandwidth among simultaneous users.[ Also see Wi-Fi 6 is coming to a router near you. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] Better still is orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA), a technology borrowed from the licensed, carrier-driven half of the wireless world. What this does is subdivide each of the available independent channels available on a given AP by a further factor of four, meaning even less slowdown for APs servicing up to a couple dozen clients at the same time.To read this article in full, please click here

What’s the IoT doing to your data center?

Much of the hype around the Internet of Things is centered on a decentralized model of deployment – edge computing, where specialized devices sit close to the endpoints they’re managing or monitoring, is very much the flavor of the month.Yet the cloud and the data center are still critical parts of the infrastructure, and the huge growth in IoT deployments is having an effect on them, as well. Even deployments that lean heavily on edge compute can stream data back to a central hub for more detailed analysis. So it’s tough to argue that rise of IoT hasn’t changed requirements and expectations in the data center.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Content delivery networks make a play for IoT business

It’s a measure of how big and meaningful a particular technology trend is when big companies that weren’t necessarily in on the ground floor start making a major push for relevance in the market. A couple years ago, every tech company in the world couldn’t wait to tell you about how into the cloud they were, and the same thing is happening to IoT. The pivots, they are a-comin’.This month, some of the heavy hitters moving to make themselves more appealing to the burgeoning IoT market are content delivery networks (CDN) like Akamai and Limelight, both of which were eager to trumpet their edge credentials. More on IoT:To read this article in full, please click here

Tapping the brakes on 802.11ac wave 2

802.11ac wave 2 is the splashy new kid in the wireless technology pool, but some experts caution that you might not want to let it play without lifeguards present just yet.Wave 2 access points are now available from major wireless vendors, and have started to make inroads into the enterprise. The technology has been gaining ground in sales statistics recently, to the point where it’s starting to undercut sales of first-gen 802.11ac gear.+ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: Study shows 802.11ac wave 2 APs gaining sales ground + US lawmakers question police use of facial recognition techTo read this article in full, please click here

Wi-Fi 6 is coming to a router near you

Just when we were all getting used to the IEEE 802.11 Wi-Fi nomenclature that differentiates between generations of the technology, the industry’s Wi-Fi Alliance has gone and made it simpler and more digestible for the user on the street.As a result, starting this month what we know as 802.11ax is officially called Wi-Fi 6.[ Find out how 5G wireless could change networking as we know it and how to deal with networking IoT. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The new, vastly simplified system also means that 802.11ac is now Wi-Fi 5, and 802.11n is Wi-Fi 4. The idea, according to the Wi-Fi Alliance, is to make matching endpoint and router capabilities a simpler matter for the rank-and-file user of Wi-Fi technology.To read this article in full, please click here

A rough guide to your next (or first) fog computing deployment

Like any kind of large-scale computing system deployment ever, the short answer to the question “what should my fog compute deployment look like” is going to be “it varies.” But since that’s not a particularly useful piece of information, Cisco principal engineer and systems architect Chuck Byers gave an overview on Wednesday at the 2018 Fog World Congress of the many variables, both technical and organizational, that go into the design, care and feeding of a fog computing setup.Byers offered both general tips about the architecture of fog computing systems, as well as slightly deeper dives into the specific areas that all fog computing deployments will have to address, including different types of hardware, networking protocols, and security.To read this article in full, please click here

Woz takes a broad but hopeful view on AI, IoT

In a wide-ranging, free-form chat on Tuesday night in San Francisco at the 2018 Fog World Congress, legendary computing figure Steve Wozniak discussed the future of technology and its role in making the world a better place.Taking the stage alongside the senior director of Cisco’s corporate strategic innovation group, Helder Antunes, Wozniak took the audience through his personal history with technology, from phone hacking in the late 1970s, through his up-and-down relationship with Steve Jobs and Apple, to his current role as a sort of ambassador for the good that technology can do for the world.To read this article in full, please click here

How updating an outdated industrial control system can work with fog computing

It’s the classic Industrial IoT problem – a 40-plant network of old-school manufacturing and production lines, run digitally by 9,000 outdated programmable logic controllers running on legacy Windows industrial PCs, was having difficulty in minimizing downtime.According to fog computing and automation startup Nebbiolo Technologies – which declined to name the client directly, saying only that it’s a “global” company – the failure of one of those Windows IPCs could result in up to 6 hours of downtime for said client. They wanted that time cut down to minutes. More on IoT: What is the IoT? How the internet of things works What edge computing is and how it’s changing the network 10 hot IoT startups to watch The 6 ways to make money in IoT What is digital twin technology and why does it matter? Getting grounded in IoT networking and security Building IoT-ready networks must become a priority What is the Industrial IoT? Why are the stakes so high? It’s a tricky issue. If those 9,000 machines were all in a data center, you could simply virtualize the whole thing and call it a day, according to Nebbiolo’s vice president of product management, Hugo Vliegen. But it's a Continue reading

Augmented reality, fog, and vision: Duke professor outlines importance of smart architectures

An academic researcher’s talk on Monday at the Fog World Congress in San Francisco demonstrated both the limits of distributed computing structures and their critical importance to future IoT and augmented reality (AR) implementations.Dr. Maria Gorlatova’s recent work has centered on the study of fog and edge architecture – specifically, the way in which particular methods of architecting those systems can affect latency and response time. She's studying the differences in systems which are on- and off-campus, that have different points of execution, which seems like the academic way of saying “where the computational work is done.”To read this article in full, please click here

IoT roundup: Startups, big carriers flex their IoT muscles and California legislation

We’re back! Here’s the latest monthly roundup of big and not-so-big news in the world of IoT, ranging from carrier doings to a neat little startup. Buckle up.California legislates IoT security California’s state legislature this month sent a bill to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk that would mandate the use of “reasonable” security features in any connected devices, which are defined as any device that “is equipped with a means for authentication outside a local area network.” So, essentially, anything that can be accessed via the Internet would be subject to SB 327.To read this article in full, please click here

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