Jon Gold

Author Archives: Jon Gold

Here’s what the big four U.S. mobile ISPs are doing with IoT

The Internet of Things is a business phenomenon at least as much as it is a technological one, which means that every company in the world with a possible angle on IoT is doing its best to claim a piece of the large and growing pie. In the case of the big four U.S. mobile data providers, the trick is selling more than just connectivity.To talk about the big four as a single entity, however, is slightly misleading. The bigger two – AT&T and Verizon – have a considerable lead in customer reach and technological maturity over T-Mobile and Sprint, with both of the former companies on track to deliver about $1 billion in IoT-related revenue in 2018, according to 451 Research vice president Brian Partridge.To read this article in full, please click here

What the big four U.S. mobile ISPs are doing with IoT

The Internet of Things is a business phenomenon at least as much as it is a technological one, which means that every company in the world with a possible angle on IoT is doing its best to claim a piece of the large and growing pie. In the case of the big four U.S. mobile data providers, the trick is selling more than just connectivity.To talk about the big four as a single entity, however, is slightly misleading. The bigger two – AT&T and Verizon – have a considerable lead in customer reach and technological maturity over T-Mobile and Sprint, with both of the former companies on track to deliver about $1 billion in IoT-related revenue in 2018, according to 451 Research vice president Brian Partridge.To read this article in full, please click here

Google could be getting serious about IoT with release of Android Things

Google I/O, the company's annual developer conference, grabs fewer headlines than it used to in ages past – the reveal of Google Glass was one for the record books, even the biggest Google detractor would have to admit. But Google's still planning to make some waves this year, particularly with what seems likely to be a full roll-out of Android Things 1.0, the variant Android OS designed for IoT.The idea behind Things is to provide a unified, one-size-fits-all software option for the developers of constrained devices like smart displays, kiosks and digital signage, among others. Device makers won’t be allowed to modify parts of Android Things’ code, specifically the parts that ensure Google can flash updates to all devices running the software at any time.To read this article in full, please click here

Google’s going to make some IoT news at I/O 2018

Google I/O, the company's annual developer conference, grabs fewer headlines than it used to in ages past – the reveal of Google Glass was one for the record books, even the biggest Google detractor would have to admit. But Google's still planning to make some waves this year, particularly with what seems likely to be a full roll-out of Android Things 1.0, the variant Android OS designed for IoT.The idea behind Things is to provide a unified, one-size-fits-all software option for the developers of constrained devices like smart displays, kiosks and digital signage, among others. Device makers won’t be allowed to modify parts of Android Things’ code, specifically the parts that ensure Google can flash updates to all devices running the software at any time.To read this article in full, please click here

OSISoft: old-school process-control company on IoT cutting edge

While the eyes of the tech world are on the usual suspects like Google and IBM, as well as high-profile operational tech firms like GE and Siemens, an almost 40-year-old company called OSISoft has quietly leveraged its expertise in process monitoring and management into an impressive list of prominent clients. These include Aramco, the national oil and gas company of Saudi Arabia, which is arguably the single most valuable and profitable company in the world, Chevron, Pacific Gas and Electric, Heineken, Tyson Foods, and Lawrence Livermore National Labs, among many others.OSISoft has a lot more in common with the GEs of the world than with some of the IT-based powerhouses that are making a lot of noise about IoT these days. It’s a company with a long history of experience in real-time data collection, making the transition into an IoT-enabled world a smooth one.To read this article in full, please click here

10 tips to minimize IoT security vulnerabilities

Here’s a handy list of tips that can help you avoid the most common mistakes that business IT pros make when bringing IoT devices onto enterprise networks.The Online Trust Alliance’s new list lays out 10 suggestions for using IoT tech in the enterprise without making the enterprise more vulnerable to security threats. The list centers on awareness and minimizing access to less-secure devices. Having a strong understanding of what devices are actually on the network, what they’re allowed to do, and how secure they are at the outset is key to a successful IoT security strategy.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]To read this article in full, please click here

Splunk debuts IIoT product for in-depth analytics

Splunk is introducing software that enables pulling in information from industrial IoT devices and analyzing it.Called Industrial Asset Intelligence, it is in essence a pre-packaged set of analytical tools used on top of the Splunk Enterprise platform, designed for use in a wide range of IIoT applications, said Seema Haji, the company’s director of product marketing for IoT.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]  “Industry 4.0’s kind of broad – it encompasses customers from transportation, oil and gas, energy and utilities companies,” she said. “These companies are using Splunk enterprise today … we see them using Splunk enterprise to gain insight into their industrial operations.”To read this article in full, please click here

Where will Microsoft spend $5B on IoT?

Microsoft’s announcement of $5 billion in new IoT investment is a public demonstration of the company’s commitment to the internet of things, but it's not immediatly clear what it will spend all that money on.In a statement announcing the new spending – to be spread out over the next four years – Microsoft cited research from A.T. Kearney that said IoT will bring a nearly $2 trillion productivity increase to the global economy and a $177 billion reduction in business costs by the end of the decade.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] There are a lot of use cases for IoT in the enterprise, and Microsoft listed several customer wins in its announcement, including Johnson Controls, Kohler and  the Alaska Department of Transportation. Gartner research vice president for AI and IoT Mark Hung said that it’s possible to divide those cases into internal and external uses.To read this article in full, please click here

Aruba CTO says IoT is great fun to work on

Not everybody in business IT seems like they’re having a great time at their job, but Aruba CTO Partha Narasimhan is an exception. He sat down with Network World at the company’s 2018 Atmosphere conference in Las Vegas to talk IoT, onboarding and more.Like company president Keerti Melkote, Narasimhan noted that Aruba’s experience in onboarding devices during the era of BYOD being an issue has stood it in good stead for IoT, but he said that the technical challenge is far greater.+ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: Getting grounded in intent-based networking + Aruba co-founder: We want to live on the edgeTo read this article in full, please click here

Malicious IoT hackers have a new enemy

IoT security is about the farthest thing from a laughing matter in the world of technology today, threatening global trade, privacy and the basic infrastructure of modern society. So you could be forgiven for being taken aback that the newest defender of vulnerable systems against bad actors looks a little like Johnny 5 from the movie Short Circuit.Researchers at Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering rolled out the HoneyBot robot late last week. In essence, it’s a canary in the digital coal mine, offering an early warning that someone is trying to compromise an organization’s systems.To read this article in full, please click here

Malicious IoT hackers have a new enemy

IoT security is about the farthest thing from a laughing matter in the world of technology today, threatening global trade, privacy and the basic infrastructure of modern society. So you could be forgiven for being taken aback that the newest defender of vulnerable systems against bad actors looks a little like Johnny 5 from the movie Short Circuit.Researchers at Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering rolled out the HoneyBot robot late last week. In essence, it’s a canary in the digital coal mine, offering an early warning that someone is trying to compromise an organization’s systems.To read this article in full, please click here

Aruba co-founder: We want to live on the edge

Tech companies of every stripe are staking their claim to the internet of things, and networking vendors like Aruba are no exception. But to hear co-founder and president Keerti Melkote tell it, his company’s pitch might have a little more heat on it than others.Aruba’s IoT credentials are based on a relatively simple premise – by definition, IoT devices have to be on the network, and they’re one of the bigger fish in that particular pool.[ Find out how 5G wireless could change networking as we know it and how to deal with networking IoT. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] The company has a lot of experience in onboarding devices – hard-won during the era of BYOD, covering provisioning, credentials, privilege levels and monitoring – which translates well to the world of IoT, particularly given the urgent need to secure those devices.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT could help seniors with dementia

The internet of things is also, in part, the internet of people, particularly in the plans of an Ontario-based chain of retirement homes and long-term care facilities called Schlegel Villages.The company, which is based in Kitchener, Ontario, designs its facilities to be less institutional-looking and more friendly, preferring to call them “villages.” But it’s got a problem to deal with, one all too common to the elderly – dementia.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] According to Schlegel’s IT director, Chris Carde, it’s a serious issue.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT could help at-risk seniors

The internet of things is also, in part, the internet of people, particularly in the plans of an Ontario-based chain of retirement homes and long-term care facilities called Schlegel Villages.The company, which is based in Kitchener, Ontario, designs its facilities to be less institutional-looking and more friendly, preferring to call them “villages.” But it’s got a problem to deal with, as at-risk seniors can sometimes become confused and attempt to leave.[ For more on IoT see tips for securing IoT on your network, our list of the most powerful internet of things companies and learn about the industrial internet of things. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ] According to Schlegel’s IT director, Chris Carde, it’s a serious issue.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT security spending to spike above $1.5 billion in the next year

The market for IoT security products is set to grow sharply, as the general IoT market becomes ever more ubiquitous, according to a report released this month by Gartner Research. While there are numerous drivers behind the increased demand for IoT security, a growing sense that regulatory compliance will shortly become an issue is one of the most pressing.The report lists security as the top barrier to success for IoT initiatives, according to a survey on IoT adoption conducted by Gartner. A big part of the problem, the report said, is that businesses often don’t have full control over which devices and software are being used at each level of a given IoT project.To read this article in full, please click here

IoT security spending to spike above $1.5 billion next year

The market for IoT security products is set to grow sharply, as the general IoT market becomes ever more ubiquitous, according to a report released this month by Gartner Research. While there are numerous drivers behind the increased demand for IoT security, a growing sense that regulatory compliance will shortly become an issue is one of the most pressing.The report lists security as the top barrier to success for IoT initiatives, according to a survey on IoT adoption conducted by Gartner. A big part of the problem, the report said, is that businesses often don’t have full control over which devices and software are being used at each level of a given IoT project.To read this article in full, please click here

What would a regulated-IoT world look like?

The wildfire growth of IoT is arguably the most important trend happening in technology today, but the ease with which bad actors can exploit its manifold security vulnerabilities has been demonstrated many times in just the past couple of years.Despite the generally laissez-faire stance the U.S. takes toward regulating technology companies, the severity of the threat – IoT security issues affect healthcare, infrastructure, transportation and many other crucial parts of society – has some calling for regulation of the IoT.The hands-off approachGiven the speed at which technology, particularly around IoT, develops these days, from drawing board to prototype to production, plenty of people would argue that it’s impossible for a regulatory regime to keep pace.To read this article in full, please click here

Predictive maintenance: One of the industrial IoT’s big draws

One subset of the internet of things – the industrial IoT – adds new capabilities to operational technology including remote management and operational analytics, but the number-one value-add so far has been predictive maintenance.Combining machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) with the deep pool of data generated by the flood of newly connected devices offers the opportunity to more deeply understand the way complex systems work and interact with each other.RELATED: Tips for security IoT on your network Most powerful IoT companies The internet of useful things - in pictures And that can promote predictive maintenance - with the ability to pinoint when components of industrial equipment are likely to fail so they can be replaced or repaired before they do, thereby avoiding more costly damage and downtime.To read this article in full, please click here

Most powerful Internet of Things companies

Billions of devices, lots of opportunityImage by ThinkstockThe predictions are getting a bit lurid – the Internet of Things will expand to around 20 billion connected devices by 2020, according to Gartner. (Other estimates range as high as ten times that figure.) MarketsandMarkets says that the market will expand from $170 billion last year to over half a trillion dollars by 2022. So who will be the biggest players in this huge and growing market? Find out here. (Note: Companies are listed in alphabetical order.) To read this article in full, please click here

What is the Industrial IoT? And why the stakes are so high

Everyone’s heard of the IoT – smart thermostats, Internet-connected refrigerators, connected lightbulbs – but there’s a subset called industrial IoT that has a much more significant day-to-day impact on businesses, safety and even lives.The term IIoT refers to the Industrial Internet of Things. In broad strokes, it’s the application of instrumentation and connected sensors and other devices to machinery and vehicles in the transport, energy and industrial sectors.What that means in practice varies widely. One IIoT system could be as simple as a connected rat trap that texts home to say that it’s been activated, while another might be as complicated as a fully automated mass production line that tracks maintenance, productivity and even ordering and shipping information across a huge, multi-layered network.To read this article in full, please click here

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