BrandPost: 6 Reasons Why 802.11ax (Wi-Fi 6) Access Points are the Preferred IoT Platform

Walking into Amazon Go store is stepping into the future. You scan your Amazon Go app and the gates open before you. You can pick up a healthy salad for lunch, a quick snack, or dinner. You just drop the items in your bag and walk out. Seconds later, you get a receipt for your purchase. It’s truly frictionless retail. Beyond the magic, there is technology: a foundation of digital signage, cameras, smart shelves, wayfinding, point-of-sale, CRM, connectivity, and much more.Amazon Go is not alone: Numerous companies are trying to stay competitive by bringing these new experiences to their clients.Why Use 802.11ax as an IoT PlatformAt Aruba, we’ve been providing high-performance secure Wi-Fi connectivity to mobile devices for many years. With the addition of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) radios into our access points, we opened up new opportunities that include wayfinding, geofencing, and asset tracking.To read this article in full, please click here

Triton and the new wave of IIoT security threats

As IIoT grows in prominence, so too does its status as a target for malicious hackers – particularly given its increased impact on the physical world; the latest and potentially most dangerous is called Triton.Triton first reared its ugly head near the end of 2017, according to security company Fireeye. It targets an industrial safety system made by Schneider Electric that monitors and secures valves, turbines and the like and shuts them down if it determines they are about to fail and cause explosions or other consequences that could damage the facility or cause harm to people. (It’s named Triton because it targets the widely used Schneider Electric Triconex industrial safety system.)To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

Internet Resilience Discussions at IETF 104

Let’s look at what’s happening in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and the upcoming IETF 104 meeting in the area of Internet infrastructure resilience. As usual, my focus here is primarily on the routing and forwarding planes, and specifically routing security and unwanted traffic of Distributed Denial of Service Attacks (DDoS) attacks. There’s interesting and important work underway at the IETF that can help addressing problems in both areas.

This time there are a lot of new ideas, especially of an operational nature, that people bring to the IETF in the form of Internet Drafts that aim to improve the security and resilience of the Internet infrastructure. So I’d like to introduce some of them to you, but keep in mind that an Internet Draft (I-D) does not necessarily indicate IETF endorsement. It also does not constitute a standard and may even not result in any work at the IETF.

So let’s look at what’s happening in BGP land.

Can BGP Communities be harmful? 

In the recent paper “BGP Communities: Even more Worms in the Routing Can“, the authors demonstrated that Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) communities can be exploited by remote parties to influence routing in Continue reading

Slim: OS kernel support for a low-overhead container overlay network

Slim: OS kernel support for a low-overhead container overlay network Zhuo et al., NSDI’19

Container overlay networks rely on packet transformations, with each packet traversing the networking stack twice on its way from the sending container to the receiving container.

There are CPU, throughput, and latency overheads associated with those traversals.

In this paper, we ask whether we can design and implement a container overlay network, where packets go through the OS kernel’s network stack only once. This requires us to remove packet transformation from the overlay network’s data-plane. Instead, we implement network virtualization by manipulating connection-level metadata at connection setup time, saving CPU cycles and reducing packet latency.

Slim comes with some caveats: it requires a kernel module for secure deployment, has longer connection establishment times, doesn’t fit with packet-based network policies, and only handles TCP traffic. For UDP, ICMP, and for its own service discovery, it also relies on an existing container overlay network (Weave Net). But for longer lasting connections managed using connection-based network policies it delivers some impressive results:

  • memcached throughput up by 71%, with latency reduced by 42%, and CPU utilisation reduced by 56%.
  • Nginx CPU utilisation reduced by 22-24%
  • PostgreSQL Continue reading

The Serverlist Newsletter: Serverless Benchmarks, Workers.dev, security implications of serverless cloud computing, and more

Check out our third edition of The Serverlist below. Get the latest scoop on the serverless space, get your hands dirty with new developer tutorials, engage in conversations with other serverless developers, and find upcoming meetups and conferences to attend.

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Migration Strategy: Moving From MPLS/LDP to Segment Routing

MPLS core networks that use Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) are common in SP core networks and have served us well. So, the thought of pulling the guts out of the core is pretty daunting and invites the question why you would want to perform open-heart surgery on such critical infrastructure.   This article attempts to explain the benefits that would accrue from such a move and gives a high-level view of a migration strategy.

Why Do I Need Segment Routing?

  • Simplicity:   LDP was invented as a label distribution protocol for MPLS because nobody wanted to go back to the standards bodies to re-invent OSPF or IS-IS so that they could carry labels.  A pragmatic decision, but one that results in networks having to run two protocols.  Two protocols means twice the complexity.  
    Segment Routing simplifies things by allowing you to turn off LDP.  Instead it carries label (or Segment ID) information in extensions to the IGP.  This then leaves you with only IS-IS or OSPF to troubleshoot.  As Da Vinci reportedly said, ‘simplicity is the ultimate sophistication’. 

  • Scale:  LDP scales, but for fast convergence RSVP-TE is often used to tunnel LDP across a core. RSVP requires core routers to Continue reading

Cisco directs high priority patches for IP phone security exposures

Cisco this week advised customers using its 7800 and 8800 series IP phones they should patch a variety of high-priority vulnerabilities that could lead to denial of service and other security problems.The company issued five security advisories, four for the 8800 and one for both the 8800 and 7800 series of IP phones. The 8800 is a high-end business desktop device that features high-definition video and mobile device integration. The 7800 is more of a general business IP phone.  Learn about 5g networks: How enterprises can prep for 5G networks 5G vs 4G: How speed, latency and apps support differ Private 5G networks are coming 5G and 6G wireless have security issues How millimeter-wave wireless could help support 5G and IoT The security advisories include:To read this article in full, please click here

Cisco directs high priority patches for IP phone security exposures

Cisco this week advised customers using its 7800 and 8800 series IP phones they should patch a variety of high-priority vulnerabilities that could lead to denial of service and other security problems.The company issued five security advisories, four for the 8800 and one for both the 8800 and 7800 series of IP phones. The 8800 is a high-end business desktop device that features high-definition video and mobile device integration. The 7800 is more of a general business IP phone.  Learn about 5g networks: How enterprises can prep for 5G networks 5G vs 4G: How speed, latency and apps support differ Private 5G networks are coming 5G and 6G wireless have security issues How millimeter-wave wireless could help support 5G and IoT The security advisories include:To read this article in full, please click here

Writing an API at the Edge with Workers and Cloud Firestore

We’re super stoked about bringing you Workers.dev, and we’re even more stoked at every opportunity we have to dogfood Workers. Using what we create keeps us tuned in to the developer experience, which takes a good deal of guesswork out of drawing our roadmaps.

Our goal with Workers.dev is to provide a way to deploy JavaScript code to our network of 165 data centers without requiring developers to register a domain with Cloudflare first. While we gear up for general availability, we wanted to provide users an opportunity to reserve their favorite subdomain in a fair and consistent way, so we built a system to allow visitors to reserve a subdomain where their Workers will live once Workers.dev is released. This is the story of how we wrote the system backing that submission process.

Requirements

Of course, we always want to use the best tool for the job, so designing the Workers that would back Workers.dev started with an inventory of constraints and user experience expectations:

Constraints

  1. We want to limit reservations to one per email address. It’s no fun if someone writes a bot to claim every good Workers subdomain in ten seconds; they Continue reading