IoT providers need to take responsibility for performance

Last year saw the continued growth of enterprises adopting internet of things solutions, with companies harnessing the power of wireless data collection, analytics and connectivity to enhance productivity and efficiency in ways we could previously not imagine.Analysts expect corporate spending on IoT in the U.S. to approach $200B in 2019, with global spending exceeding $800B. As adoption has grown, privacy and security advocates have called for regulating IoT to enhance personal privacy and to strengthen the security of IoT devices and services.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)

IBM marries on-premises, private- and public-cloud data

IBM has taken the wraps off of a new multi-cloud integration platform it hopes will help customers manage, secure and integrate data no matter where it resides – in on-premise, private-cloud or public-cloud applications.Enterprise customers are faced with the daunting task of bridging legacy applications with latest cloud service, and many can’t just lift and shift, said Juan Carlos Soto, IBM vice president of Hybrid Cloud Integration. On top of that many businesses are already trying to manage five or more cloud environments, often from multiple vendors, and they can’t keep up, he said.To read this article in full, please click here

Video: Automating Simple Reports

Network automation is scary when you start using it in a brownfield environment. After all, it’s pretty easy to propagate an error to all devices in your network. However, there’s one thing you can do that’s usually pretty harmless: collect data from network devices and create summary reports or graphs.

I collected several interesting solutions created by attendees of our Building Network Automation Solutions online course and described them in a short video.

Want to create something similar? No time to procrastinate – the registration for the Spring 2019 course ends tomorrow.

Check Point GAiA as Personal Firewall on Linux – Part2

This is the second part of the tutorial that aims to deploy Check Point Gaia as a personal firewall under Linux. Let' assume that we have created underlying network infrastructure with the scripts create_taps.sh and bridge_interfaces.sh in Part1. This part goes further and explains Gaia installation on QEMU virtual machine (VM).  We will use the same network topology depicted on the Picture 1.1 of the part 1. Let's start with the point 2.

Picture 1.1 Network Topology

2. Checkpoint Gaia Installation

First, we need to create an empty qcow VM disk with qemu-img utility as we want to install Gaia into this image.

$ /usr/local/bin/qemu-img create -f qcow2 checkpoint.img 100G

As we downloaded Gaia ISO image in the part1 of the tutorial, we can start Checkpoint Gaia VM machine with the ISO attached  to Qemu cdrom.

$ sudo /usr/local/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 -m 4096M -enable-kvm -smp 2 \
-boot d -cdrom Check_Point_R80.10_T462_Gaia.iso checkpoint.img  \
-netdev tap,id=net0,ifname=tap0,script=no,downscript=no \
-device e1000,netdev=net0,mac=00:11:22:33:44:00 \
-netdev tap,id=net1,ifname=tap1,script=no,downscript=no \
-device e1000,netdev=net1,mac=00:11:22:33:44:01 \
-netdev tap,id=net2,ifname=tap2,script=no,downscript=no \
-device e1000,netdev=net2,mac=00:11:22:33:44:02

Below are the configuration options.

Select:
- Install Gaia on this system
- Proceed with the installation
- Keyboard - US
- Partition Continue reading

The Curious Case of the Garden State Imposter

The Curious Case of the Garden State Imposter
The Curious Case of the Garden State Imposter

Dealing with abuse complaints isn’t easy, for any Internet company. The variety of subject matters at issue, the various legal and regulatory requirements, and the uncertain intentions of complaining parties combine to create a ridiculously complex situation.  We often suggest to those who propose easy answers to this challenge that they spend a few hours tracking the terminal of a member of our Trust & Safety team to get a feel for how difficult it can be. Yet even we were a bit surprised by an unusual abuse report we’ve been dealing with recently.

Last week, we received what looked like a notable law enforcement request: a complaint from an entity that identified itself as the “New Jersey Office of the Attorney General” and claimed to be a notice Cloudflare was “serving files consisting of 3D printable firearms in violation of NJ Stat. Ann. § 2C:39-9 3(I)(2).”  The complaint further asked us to “delete all files described within 24 hours” and threatened “to press charges in order to preserve the safety of the citizens of New Jersey.”

Because we are generally not the host of information, and are unable to remove content from the Internet that we don’t Continue reading

That VPN may not be as secure as you think

If you’re a VPN subscriber and have ever wondered just how secure the supposedly encrypted pipe that you’re using through the internet is — and whether the anonymity promise made by the VPN provider is indeed protecting your privacy— well, your hunches may be correct. It turns out several of these connections are not secure.Academics say they’ve discovered a whopping 13 programming errors in 61 separate VPN systems tested recently. The configuration bungles “allowed Internet traffic to travel outside the encrypted connection,” the researchers say.The independent research group, made up of computer scientists from UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Spain’s Madrid Institute of Advanced Studies (IMDEA) with International Computer Science Institute, write in the Conversation this month, some of which is redistributed by Homeland Security Newswire, that six of 200 VPN services also scandalously monitored user traffic. That’s more serious than unintended leaks, the team explains — users trust providers not to snoop. The point of a VPN is to be private and not get monitored. VPN use ranges from companies protecting commercial secrets on public Wi-Fi to dissidents.To read this article in full, please click here

That VPN may not be as secure as you think

If you’re a VPN subscriber and have ever wondered just how secure the supposedly encrypted pipe that you’re using through the internet is — and whether the anonymity promise made by the VPN provider is indeed protecting your privacy— well, your hunches may be correct. It turns out several of these connections are not secure.Academics say they’ve discovered a whopping 13 programming errors in 61 separate VPN systems tested recently. The configuration bungles “allowed Internet traffic to travel outside the encrypted connection,” the researchers say.The independent research group, made up of computer scientists from UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Spain’s Madrid Institute of Advanced Studies (IMDEA) with International Computer Science Institute, write in the Conversation this month, some of which is redistributed by Homeland Security Newswire, that six of 200 VPN services also scandalously monitored user traffic. That’s more serious than unintended leaks, the team explains — users trust providers not to snoop. The point of a VPN is to be private and not get monitored. VPN use ranges from companies protecting commercial secrets on public Wi-Fi to dissidents.To read this article in full, please click here

That VPN may not be as secure as you think

If you’re a VPN subscriber and have ever wondered just how secure the supposedly encrypted pipe that you’re using through the internet is — and whether the anonymity promise made by the VPN provider is indeed protecting your privacy— well, your hunches may be correct. It turns out several of these connections are not secure.Academics say they’ve discovered a whopping 13 programming errors in 61 separate VPN systems tested recently. The configuration bungles “allowed Internet traffic to travel outside the encrypted connection,” the researchers say.The independent research group, made up of computer scientists from UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Spain’s Madrid Institute of Advanced Studies (IMDEA) with International Computer Science Institute, write in the Conversation this month, some of which is redistributed by Homeland Security Newswire, that six of 200 VPN services also scandalously monitored user traffic. That’s more serious than unintended leaks, the team explains — users trust providers not to snoop. The point of a VPN is to be private and not get monitored. VPN use ranges from companies protecting commercial secrets on public Wi-Fi to dissidents.To read this article in full, please click here